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Windows Microsoft Operating Systems Software Upgrades

Windows 8.1 Rolls Out Today 398

Posted by timothy
from the improvements-abound dept.
The newest iteration of Windows has begun rolling out, and is winning positive reviews. (Here's an in-depth review from Ars, and a more concise one from Wired — both give 8.1 a thumbs-up). Kelerei wrote with the above-linked TechDirt article on the release, noting that it is a staged rollout rather than global. Starting this morning, though, 8.1 is available to some customers. Kelerei writes: "The upgrade is optional (and free) for existing Windows 8 users, though if one looks at the changes, it's hard to imagine why those already on it wouldn't upgrade." Also at Slash BI.
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Windows 8.1 Rolls Out Today

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 17, 2013 @07:46AM (#45151637)

    I'll never upgrade, never!

  • Meh (Score:3, Interesting)

    by fermat1313 (927331) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @07:48AM (#45151659)
    Windows 8 was a huge disaster, and windows 8.1 only applies a different color of frosting to the same stale cupcake. As both a personal user and IT decision maker, there's no way I'd put Windows 8.x on anything around here.
    • Re:Meh (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Sponge Bath (413667) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @07:54AM (#45151707)
      The millions of consumers buying cupcake pans this fall will need to fill them with something. Toast and bagels won't fit.
      • Re:Meh (Score:4, Interesting)

        by Charliemopps (1157495) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:05AM (#45151817)

        Cupcake pans are quickly going out of style. Thanks in part to all the shitty Microsoft cupcakes getting baked recently.

      • Re:Meh (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Anrego (830717) * on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:28AM (#45152019)

        I've normally considered myself fairly pragmatic, and while I've run Linux happily for well over a decade, I totally get why it's not a practical solution for most. Interesting thing is, for the first time since.. forever, I actually feel like I can recommend Linux to my non-technical friends. The situation that's coming up a lot:

        "I run windows XP, I tried windows 8 and hated it, what the heck am I supposed to do when they stop supporting XP".

        Gaming is still the big sticking point (though even that's improving a lot), but for my "facebook and email" friends, throwing mint on there (or whatever the current user-friendly distro of choice is) is becoming a realistic thought. One in particular has a computer that's barely capable of running XP right now, so I might recommend it to her as a trial.

        The other big unresolved sticking point has been attachment to specific software. In the case above, she has used some ancient version of "print master gold" for a while and would very much like to continue doing so. It's this kind of thing that we tend to shrug off that keeps people from switching, but at this point it probably won't work on windows 8 anyway, so nothing to lose, and might be able to make it work through wine..

        • Re:Meh (Score:5, Insightful)

          by operagost (62405) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:59AM (#45152341) Homepage Journal

          "I run windows XP, I tried windows 8 and hated it, what the heck am I supposed to do when they stop supporting XP".

          Run Windows 7 until that leaves support in 2020?

          • by Anrego (830717) *

            That's probably what I would do if I had to run windows, but people are (not too surprisingly) hesitant to spend an additional $200 or so to get an older version of windows. Upgrading from XP to 7 probably makes sense for those running XP on machines that can support it.

          • Re:Meh (Score:5, Interesting)

            by JohnnyMindcrime (2487092) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @10:05AM (#45153057)

            Speaking as an IT person with 30+ years experience who is mainly a Linux guy but likes XP and Windows 7, I only ditched my last copy of XP (excluding virtualised ones) about 6 months ago and moved to Windows 7.

            Ultimately, I like Windows 7, it's as reliable as XP (mainly because I never found XP to be unreliable) and a lot slicker on newer hardware, but then XP was starting to get clunky with newer machines.

            But I hated Windows 7 when I first started with it, it seemed that stuff (especially in Control Panel) had been moved around for no readily apparent reason and a couple of months to comfortably find everything I wanted to as quickly as I could in XP.

            My point is that it took even an IT geek a couple of months to get used to a new OS, so why is this any different for "Joe Sixpack" ditching XP and moving to, say, Linux Mint with it's Cinnamon interface that is very similar to the XP layout.

            It's all just about familiarity and I am sure every Microsoft-focused person out there suffered some initial infuriation when they fired up Windows 7 for the first time and saw how different a lot of it is from XP. Yes, we all got used to it and like it now, but that time to familiarise was still there, even if you choose not to acknowledge it.

            • But I hated Windows 7 when I first started with it, it seemed that stuff (especially in Control Panel) had been moved around for no readily apparent reason and a couple of months to comfortably find everything I wanted to as quickly as I could in XP.

              About 4 years from now people will be complaining about Windows and saying this about Windows 8.1. People complained about Win2k, WinXP, Win7, and now Win8.1 - and eventually they discover the new is actually fine. I have been using Windows 8 on my dev VMs from within a few weeks after it was out; it's fine, even though stuff has been moved around for no readily apparent reason.

        • Re:Meh (Score:4, Insightful)

          by dragon-file (2241656) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @10:41AM (#45153447)

          The other big unresolved sticking point has been attachment to specific software. In the case above, she has used some ancient version of "print master gold" for a while and would very much like to continue doing so. It's this kind of thing that we tend to shrug off that keeps people from switching

          Couldn't agree more. I had a friend who brought me his laptop... The OS drive was shot and the XP CD key was gone. So I replaced the drive and installed mint. His first complaint was not having office so i recommended wine. He came back 3 months later saying it was running slow. His solution to the Office problem was to install a cracked copy of XP in Virtual Box.

          Moral of the story: Software makes the average user HATE change.

        • by JohnnyMindcrime (2487092) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @11:41AM (#45154105)

          I don't think gaming is anywhere near the big sticking point that it used to be when it comes to choosing Linux over Windows.

          Microsoft essentially killed big commercial PC gaming on Windows when they took the decision to split DirectX 9 and 10 across XP and Vista respectively. Making that decision when they did hurt the Windows games development community considerably because it fragmented game development when most people were still on XP, and was precisely the scenario DirectX was designed to avoid. It wouldn't surprise me if it was a deliberate tactic by Microsoft to drive people to X-Box for their gaming needs, but it undoubtedly had a huge negative impact on commercial PC gaming releases.

          In the longer term, it's actually an extremely good thing to have happened because it's killed the stranglehold big PC games companies had on Windows games and opened the floodgates for indie developers to start making games again - not to mention the impact of Kickstarter in getting games released that, under big corporate control, would never have seen the light of day.

          Steam is going to be an interesting turning point for gaming on Linux, but as some analysts are already saying, the actual turning point will likely only be if and when there's a killer game on Steam for Linux (or SteamBox or whatever it's name is) that gets people buying it in their droves.

          I would argue that big applications like MS Office and Photoshop are bigger obstacles to the adoption of Linux. In reality, most MS Office and Photoshop users (who are, let's face it, probably using pirated copies anyway) would find that LibreOffice and The GIMP do everything that they need to do anyway but are just too lazy and/or scared to try something new. Sure, there are a minority of "professional" users who need the specific features in MS Office, Photoshop and other big commercial Windows applications, but they really are a tiny proportion compared to the overall userbases of them.

    • Re:Meh (Score:4, Insightful)

      by SpoonStomper (1330973) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @07:55AM (#45151719)
      That's quite silly. Considering this brings back the missing features that everyone was missing like a start button and boot to desktop. This puts it on par and better in many ways than Windows 7.
      • Re:Meh (Score:5, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 17, 2013 @07:59AM (#45151759)

        The start button doesn't actually do anything. It just brings up the modern UI.

      • Re:Meh (Score:5, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:02AM (#45151783)

        Except the start button does the same thing as the Windows button in Windows 8.0 - show up the Metro UI. In effect, it's only taking up additional space on the task bar for those who ignore the Metro stuff.

      • Re:Meh (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:07AM (#45151835)

        Not really.

        Boot to desktop is nice.

        The missing Start button that they "gave back" however now takes you to a "Start Screen" that takes over your entire screen (what if I wanted to navigate based on a graphic that was previously on the screen or based on instructions that I wanted to keep up) and relies on hot-corners and swiping for navigation (which are a waste based on the simplicity of the previous interface.

        The "returned" start button is equivalent to someone buying a car and stating that they wanted a manual transmission. Then when the car was delivered it turned out that it had an automatic transmission. Then when this draws a complaint, the seller installs a stick and clutch pedal, but leaves the automatic transmission.

        What's scary is that 3rd party companies had no problem doing this almost on day one. This is more just MS not wanting to bend. Not surprisingly, nobody I've spoken to is happy with this.

      • Re:Meh (Score:5, Interesting)

        by zixxt (1547061) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:29AM (#45152033)

        That's quite silly. Considering this brings back the missing features that everyone was missing like a start button and boot to desktop. This puts it on par and better in many ways than Windows 7.

        The start button does not doing anything useful. And its still missing the Start Menu, and I very much prefer Aero over the ugly flatness of Windows 8 metro interface.

      • Re:Meh (Score:4, Informative)

        by citizenr (871508) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @12:08PM (#45154505) Homepage

        This is a METRO button, there is no start menu.

    • by MrDoh! (71235)
      I've found it great. To launch VirtualBox and XP machines on. Apart from that, it's still... just terrible. I hear screams of frustration from the main office far too often still.
    • Re:Meh (Score:4, Interesting)

      by slaker (53818) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:31AM (#45152053)

      Honestly, it's fine. I rolled out 8 (plus Classic Shell) to about 150 systems and they've been trouble free. My power users like to whine about having to go look for that's now split between Control Panel and the Settings modern app, but power users always whine about things and I don't care. For every person who moans about something that moved, I have at least one compliment about how fast their computer seems now. My less-experienced users actually do pretty well with the start screen that puts the three or four applications they're supposed to be using in a nice, huge tile right in front of their face.

      • Re:Meh (Score:4, Interesting)

        by jones_supa (887896) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:45AM (#45152183)

        My power users like to whine about having to go look for that's now split between Control Panel and the Settings modern app, but power users always whine about things and I don't care.

        It's still a rather unelegant split. If Microsoft wanted to go with the Modern UI, they could (and should) have implemented the classic Control Panel in its fullest, inside the Modern UI. Also some of the Windows Accessories are still missing a Modern UI counterpart, including Notepad! These things don't make sense. They didn't do the proper integration work and that's why the new UI still sometimes looks like a taped-on quick tech demo.

    • by Suki I (1546431)

      As long as it stays on the view I wanted without switching to something else whenever I touch the trackpad, I am in.

    • Re:Meh (Score:5, Interesting)

      by slashmydots (2189826) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @09:24AM (#45152601)
      I agree with that. I build A LOT of computer at my repair and custom builds shop and now that my ad campaign is basically "I still build new PCs with Windows 7" I've had even more. I refuse to sell it. The problem is, most of my virus removal and diagnostic tools don't work on 8 but I can't simply refuse to service it either. But besides that temporary annoyance, I'm doing fine refusing to sell it. I didn't build one single Vista computer the entire time it was out since XP licenses were still available and I kept getting decent used XP machines in to refurb and that's how I intend to handle 8 as well. I REALLY hope Windows 9 doesn't put me out of business though because 7 will stop being available past then.
      • by DarthVain (724186)

        Windows 7 support will be around a very long time.

        A) No corporate or government enterprise shops will be moving to 8 or even 8.1 as they all moved to 7 (or in the process of).
        B) It will be a huge install base that will likely pressure MS to extend whatever support deadline they decide to have.
        C) IT shops are not going to want to run multiple version of Windows, so new Windows 7 systems will still have to keep being deployed.

        I just built a personal Windows 7 system last month, and it was not a decision I wor

    • Re:Meh (Score:5, Insightful)

      by asmkm22 (1902712) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @10:21AM (#45153273)

      8.1 actually makes the experience pretty decent on a desktop. Just get used to right-clicking the start menu instead of left-clicking gives you quick access to most t hings you need. The real "start menu" is still there, but once you unpin the crap it starts with (weather apps and such) and pin your actual programs, it functions well enough. It's also nice, now that I'm used to it, to be able to just hit the windows key and start typing to get the program i want. The search is fast, and you really just type and hit enter.

      There are a few tweaks to make, though, but nothing real difficult. For example, I set the default picture viewer to the actual Windows Picture Viewer (or whatever it's called). By default it loads up an app, which makes you go through the weird transition away from the desktop with no real clear way on how to get back (mouse the top left for a list of open apps, including the desktop).

      For the record, I couldn't stand version 8. I only recently gave 8.1 a try, via Technet, and it's been pretty decent. Certainly not the horrific beast that win 8's reputation implies.

      Oh, and I work in IT.

    • by smash (1351)
      I'm in a similar position (hardware and software platform selection is mostly my call) and i see essentially zero reason to go to either 8 or 8.1 at this time. Though i suspect we'll end up getting forced that way sooner or later due to the desire for tablets and new hardware - win7 non-SP1 slipstreamed already runs into issues with the installer fucking up on 4k sector drives.
    • Re:Meh (Score:4, Funny)

      by ISoldat53 (977164) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @11:18AM (#45153815)
      I liked the comment in the ARS article asking "How do I remove the Start Button from windows 8.1."
  • by gestalt_n_pepper (991155) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @07:50AM (#45151681)

    Windows 8.x is back, and this time, it's personal.

    Or it feels that way. I've been working with the Windows 8.1 RTM. Many more things seem to break on the Windows 8.1 RTM that did on Windows 8. Mayhem ensued. Kiss your SQLE 2005 goodbye if you haven't already. Change your Setup.exe's to Vista compatibility if you don't want them to take an hour to install. Other than that, no worries.

    • If it's like most major software products, I'd expect it to take a month or two for them to patch the major headaches. I'm looking forward to 8.1 as an excuse to reinstall Windows 8. When I first got 8 about a year ago, it gave me a lot of stability issues and software incompatibility issues (especially with Chrome and Notepad++ for some reason) that were mostly patched within the first month. By the second month, it was running pretty smoothly. I only went back to 7 because of a few remaining driver issues

    • by jones_supa (887896) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:18AM (#45151937)

      I have also been running 8.1 RTM for a couple of weeks and my experience is similar. Little glitches here and there. Microsoft has released quite stable stuff lately so I didn't expect this level of bugginess.

      Some examples:
      - On various laptops, the screen brightness indicator displays wrong dynamic range after coming out from suspend or hibernation
      - When a device is connected to the computer, a "Device Setup" dialog appears and it can hang there forever
      - The automatic installer for .NET Framework 3.5 gets stuck and the manual DISM utility has to be used instead
      - Windows Explorer displays Korean characters correctly, but Japanese characters are displayed as squares
      - When I have two monitors connected (8.1 can show a taskbar on both screens) and set the taskbar setting to "Never combine" (a Vista-style look), the taskbar button labels are shown only on the primary display
      - When I turn Bluetooth off, the settings application freezes for a long time
      - The verification code to authorize my Windows Live account is often not successfully sent via e-mail

  • by xianzombie (123633) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @07:54AM (#45151711)

    Before everyone starts bashing on Win8 (even though it does, to some extent, deserve it), I feel obligated to state:

    The OS:
    1. Performs better than Win7 (for me)
    2. Has been perhaps the most stable iteration of windows (for me).

    The UI:

    Is horrible in terms of the default layout. Adding back in a 'normal' start menu (via Classic Shell, etc) and turning off the charm bars are key to making it a usable GUI, IMO.

    With the above 'tweaks' the biggest thing I miss comparing 7 to 8 is the loss of being able to search files directly from the search bar. Perhaps that' some option/tweak I missed somewhere along the lines.

    Will I try 8.1? If I can do it for free, yes. Will I give them money for it? NO!

    • by xianzombie (123633) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @07:56AM (#45151731)

      Well, in true Slashdot fashion, I didn't read the article or full summary thereby missing:

      "The upgrade is optional (and free) for existing Windows 8 users, though if one looks at the changes, it's hard to imagine why those already on it wouldn't upgrade."

    • by Sockatume (732728)

      Why treat "the UI" as seperate? The human-computer interface is as much a part of the OS as anything else. To be frank, if I can't talk to the computer efficiently, it doesn't matter how well the software and hardware can talk between each other.

      • Why? Android MIUI vs HTC Sense vs Others; XFCE vs KDE vs Gnome, etc.

        The default UI for Win8 basically sucks, but some tweaks make it a functional system again

    • by Twinbee (767046)
      For searching you should be using Locate32 [cogit.net] which is light years ahead of the search on Windows.
    • The OS:
      1. Performs better than Win7 (for me)
      2. Has been perhaps the most stable iteration of windows (for me).

      Classic Shell solved my problems with the UI.

      So far Win 8 does one thing better than Win 7 (or Vista). It handles printers well.

      1. I attached an older LJ 1020 to a new Win 8 laptop and installed the latest driver. PDF files would not print, so I rolled back to the latest *recommended* driver. Removing the printer and installing the new driver worked quickly and cleanly.

      2. I have two networked HP pri

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 17, 2013 @07:55AM (#45151721)

    What is the use case for me typing something in the windows search charm thing and me wanting to get results from my PC and web pages, music, and photos from the Internet? Searching for files or file content on my PC already got harder with vista. Now this? If I want to search the web I can use google or bing or whatever I want. When I search my PC it is because I need to find a file on my PC. Also I do not want my data on sky drive.

    • Cuz man...the Cloud....ain't ya heard! That's where all the important files are going.

      *blech*

    • I don't even need to search my PC. There's these things called directories. In those I put my stuff nicely where it belongs.

      I'm not sure if it serves anyone to have this colorful jumble of icons mixed with local files (with no idea of their location), application shortcuts and web results. At least me it only makes nauseous and disorganized.

  • by TWiTfan (2887093) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @07:56AM (#45151737)

    [crickets chirping]

  • I don't trust MS at all. Why, I reckon that MS Windows 8.1 will come with new and exciting backdoors for the NSA (and any other security agency or criminal gang (but I repeat myself)). OK, I might be exaggerating slightly, it won't come with deliberate backdoors as such, simply holes that haven't been fixed yet, guaranteed to be around for at least a few months.

    I'll stick with my Ubuntu thanks (until I try Debian again later this or next month, and see if it works). Now, you might say that Ubuntu has its flaws, and well, it does. But, if you don't use Unity or the Software Centre, you can get a perfectly good system with minimal issues, and no obvious privacy concerns. (I use 12.04 with Gnome 3.something. I have issues with this version of Gnome, but I still prefer it to KDE (which kept crashing on me) and Xfce (which doesn't have enough fancyness, I do have a fancy powerful laptop, I like a bit of eye candy).)

    Remember: if you are worried about security or privacy, don't use a closed source OS connected to the Internet.

  • by onyxruby (118189) <.onyxruby. .at. .comcast.net.> on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:06AM (#45151831)

    This is sort of what Windows 8 should have been to begin with. What this doesn't do is fix the issue with the missing Start MENU. The result is that every time you need to load an application through the menu you are forced back into the abomination that is the Metro interface. This is a deal breaker for the enterprise and shows Microsoft's continued contempt for their customers and what their customers need.

    A tablet interface has no business on a desktop and Microsoft should have made it completely optional. Fixing boot to desktop was a half hearted start to be able to say they were listening to feedback - sort of. However the stunt with the Start Button instead of the Start Menu was a slap in the face to the enterprise and large OEM's that have been begging Microsoft to restore the Start Menu.

    Sales will continue their worst downturn in history since the advent of the personal computer. OEM's will continue to lose money hand over fist. Enterprise customers held with contempt are evaluating third party vendors they never would have considered before. If you force people to use a new interface regardless, than it's an opportunity for your customers to pick what that interface is going to be. Sales of Mac's to the Enterprise have hit record highs, Linux is breaking through where it never did before. People are even toying with Chromebooks.

    • by Theophany (2519296) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:17AM (#45151927)

      Enterprise customers held with contempt are evaluating third party vendors they never would have considered before. If you force people to use a new interface regardless, than it's an opportunity for your customers to pick what that interface is going to be. Sales of Mac's to the Enterprise have hit record highs, Linux is breaking through where it never did before. People are even toying with Chromebooks.

      This seems a tad hysterical. Enterprise users will continue to use W7 for a while yet. It still works, is still supported and is less of a headache to maintain for the tech guys than upgrading everything to work with W8. Businesses aren't clamouring to upgrade all their machinery just because MS has a newer OS.

    • The result is that every time you need to load an application through the menu you are forced back into the abomination that is the Metro interface.
      .

      I installed Classic Shell and that was the last I saw of start tiles. I installed apps from Classic's Run and partied like is was 2002.

      • by onyxruby (118189)

        Which is great for a single user on their own personal computer. However the idea of doing that for the enterprise with tens of thousands or a 100,000+ systems is something that I should never have to do. Star Dock, Classic Shell and like kind programs shouldn't be needed to begin with and there are questions of scalability, stability, support and so on (all the more so since it would be a core app). It's simply too big of a kludge and not worth the risk unless you are financially invested in Microsoft stoc

  • by jkrise (535370) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:12AM (#45151875) Journal

    1. No improvement in user interface. Touch sucks on the desktop and Microsoft knows it. A Start button without a Start Menu is useless.

    2. Metro style apps are very painful to deploy in the Enterprise; even for those with Subscription (Dis)Advantage.

    3. Still not immune from viruses and worms - needs continuous stream of patches; customer remains at the mercy of Microsoft; like the forced ditching of XP which works perfectly fine.

    4. Many existing licensed software such as SQLE are not supported in 8 series; so all that money is wasted expenditure.

    5. Still no native support in the OS for cameras; SIM cards, etc. even Android is better in that respect despite being minuscule in size compared to 8.1.

    The list of drawbacks continue; nothing to write home about; despite these paid shill reviews.

    • by Joining Yet Again (2992179) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:46AM (#45152201)

      3. Still not immune from viruses and worms - needs continuous stream of patches;

      Yeah, that utopia really is proving hard to reach.

      customer remains at the mercy of Microsoft; like the forced ditching of XP which works perfectly fine.

      Yeah, fuck Microsoft with its 12 year support cycle. Versions of OS X and Linux from 2001 are still in mainstream support.

      5. Still no native support in the OS for cameras; SIM cards, etc. even Android is better in that respect despite being minuscule in size compared to 8.1.

      Eh, my webcam works fine in Windows 8 without extra support. I assume Android has SIM card drivers because of u no it's used for 'phones a lot.

    • 3. Still not immune from viruses and worms

      You say that like it should be easy to fix.

    • A Start button without a Start Menu is useless.

      I use Windows 7, and I haven't used the Start Menu in years. I find it much easier to simply type enough of what I want (after hitting the 'start' button) to bring it up, then arrow down to it. I am told, though cannot confirm from experience, that Win 8 works the same way, just type into Metro and there it is. For example, I can type {Windows button, "Add or r"} to get to Add/Remove Programs. {Windows, "Fire"} brings up Firefox, and so on. Honestly, I think the 'Start Menu' is hideous and clunky. So, op

    • Still not immune from viruses and worms - needs continuous stream of patches

      Actually these days MS has pretty good toolkit against malware: the standard NX protection, signed binaries, Windows Defender, Windows Resource Protection, and User Account Control. All of those are quite well implemented tools with minimal degradation to system performance. And it's really not a continuous stream of patches -- usually you are disturbed only once per month with a handful of patches.

  • by PeterHammer (612517) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:13AM (#45151897)

    ...another tree fell without a sound

  • no no no! (Score:3, Interesting)

    by slashmydots (2189826) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @08:14AM (#45151911)
    "and is winning positive reviews"
    This is the biggest lie I have ever heard. Now you search your computer for vacation photos and get bombarded by bullshit Bing links. The start menu still doesn't exist. I'm pretty sure it still takes a computer engineer to find the shut down button. It's absolute garbage.
  • ...holds it's breath!
  • by linebackn (131821) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @09:43AM (#45152815)

    The newest iteration of Windows has begun rolling out, and is buying positive reviews.

    There, fixed that for you.

    Does anybody besides the shills really think anybody not paid or threatened with leg breaking would give this a positive review?

  • by Provocateur (133110) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @09:45AM (#45152833) Homepage

    Here is the MAD Magazine fold-out version

    Windows 8 |-------| .1 ---(fold until the two bars meet)

    Result

    Windows 3.1

  • by MobyDisk (75490) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @10:26AM (#45153307) Homepage

    The reason people hate the Windows 8 start screen is because it displays politics. Seriously, take a look:

    http://www.bleepstatic.com/tutorials/windows-8/introduction-start-screen/windows-8-start-screen.jpg [bleepstatic.com]
    Peace envoy to visit Syria to broker ceasefire...

    People do not want to see politics appear in their start menu. This is the stupidest idea in computing. This distracts people, it intrinsically makes them angry.

  • by hackus (159037) on Thursday October 17, 2013 @01:01PM (#45155199) Homepage

    .1 reasons to upgrade.

    Seriously though, what a huge yawn. Within a year or two I won't even need a windows machine to play games, the primary purpose of windows in the world right now.

    The only people who will need to still use windows on a daily basis will be legacy corporations like Microsoft.

    I already have my Linux servers, desktops and web/android apps. BONUS: I have all the source code for the security infrastructure that powers them.

    Now, all we need is a Linux game machine for our Linux desktops. It is going to happen within a year or two now that the graphics plumbing is worked out and ATI GPU's are now fully documented, including the latest generation GPUs. (i.e. 3.12 kernel/X 1.15 and possibly Wayland far far far into the future.)

    -Hack

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