Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Google Advertising Privacy

Google Starts Tracking Retail Store Visits On Android and iOS 157

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the extra-penny-per-cpm dept.
recoiledsnake writes with news of Google tracking a bit more of your life. From the article: "Google is beta-testing a program that uses smartphone location data to determine when consumers visit stores, according to agency executives briefed on the program by Google employees. Google then connects these store visits to Google searches conducted on smartphones. If someone conducts a Google mobile search for 'screwdrivers,' for instance, a local hardware store could bid to have its store listing served to that user. By pairing that person's location data with its database of store listings, Google can see if the person who saw that ad subsequently visited the store.It is easiest for Google to conduct this passive location tracking on Android users, since Google has embedded location tracking into the software. Once Android users opt in to location services, Google starts collecting their location data as continuously as technologically possible."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Google Starts Tracking Retail Store Visits On Android and iOS

Comments Filter:
  • by noh8rz10 (2716597) on Saturday November 09, 2013 @05:14PM (#45378879)

    and the noose tightens a little bit more...

    • by srmalloy (263556) on Saturday November 09, 2013 @05:17PM (#45378893) Homepage

      Yet another reason not to opt-in to data collection...

      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by noh8rz10 (2716597)

        it's not that simple. it's tied to location services on a phone. like, you want phone navigation? that requires location services. you want it to show your location on a map? that requires location services. oh btdubs they also make records of your every location.

        for iOS this is pretty easy, just don't use the core google apps (maps, google search, gmail, chrome). for android, you're kinda screwed, because it's baked into the OS. Another reason to stick with iOS. I can't say anything about windows phone OS.

        • by Jane Q. Public (1010737) on Saturday November 09, 2013 @05:43PM (#45379035)

          "for android, you're kinda screwed, because it's baked into the OS."

          No, it isn't. I'm getting pretty sick of these falsities being repeated.

          It's baked into some APPS in the OS. You aren't obligated to use them. You can disable them and use 3rd-party tools like Waze or any of the many others.

          My location tracking is off most of the time. When it is on, I use 3rd-party software. Network analysis shows that my Android phone isn't "phoning home" to Google with my location.

          I sometimes use Google Maps to find things. But then I am not at the location I am trying to find.

          • by noh8rz10 (2716597)

            well it's hella convenient for location services to be on for core phone functions, like search and maps. you use these things in so many ways that it becomes very fluid. which is why i prefer to use a phone os from a company that doesn't sell my recorded locations to others.

            • by Holi (250190)

              > i prefer to use a phone os from a company that doesn't sell my recorded locations to others.

              And please, which company would that be?

              • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

                by noh8rz10 (2716597)

                > i prefer to use a phone os from a company that doesn't sell my recorded locations to others.

                And please, which company would that be?

                casting a wide net, there are four major mobile phone OS's. Here's a link to news about one OS capturing and selling location information:

                Google Starts Tracking Retail Store Visits On Android and iOS [slashdot.org]

                do you have any links for iOS, blackberry, or windows phone?

                • casting a wide net, there are four major mobile phone OS's. Here's a link to news about one OS capturing and selling location information:

                  Google Starts Tracking Retail Store Visits On Android and iOS

                  do you have any links for iOS, blackberry, or windows phone?

                  Microsoft is doing adverts now in the UK asking potential customers if they want an email service that doesn't read their emails. They don't mention Google by name yet.

            • by Jane Q. Public (1010737) on Saturday November 09, 2013 @06:35PM (#45379273)

              well it's hella convenient for location services to be on for core phone functions, like search and maps. you use these things in so many ways that it becomes very fluid. which is why i prefer to use a phone os from a company that doesn't sell my recorded locations to others.

              Apparently you completely missed my point.

              Location services on Android phones do NOT "call home" to Google. Google APPS do.

              Don't use the Google apps, and it's not an issue. And by the way, this is is true for BOTH Android and iOS. Google apps will report your location the same amount and the same way, whichever phone you are using.

              The only difference is that Google bundles their apps with Android. Apple doesn't bundle them with iOS.

              • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

                by BasilBrush (643681)

                Don't use the Google apps, and it's not an issue. And by the way, this is is true for BOTH Android and iOS. Google apps will report your location the same amount and the same way, whichever phone you are using.

                I'm afraid you're missing the fact that when Google, does apps for iOS, they need to stay within the app review guidelines, including on privacy issues. Which excludes lots of bad behaviour. On Android, Google are free to do whatever they want, within the law.

                You claim there is no difference, but that's a big one.

                • by Jane Q. Public (1010737) on Saturday November 09, 2013 @07:30PM (#45379565)

                  I'm afraid you're missing the fact that when Google, does apps for iOS, they need to stay within the app review guidelines,
                  ...
                  You claim there is no difference, but that's a big one.

                  I didn't miss anything, and no there isn't.

                  Apple guidelines do not require apps to NOT phone home... in fact there was a big flap about that just recently... iOS apps tracking people in ways that they did not approve.

                  Android app guidelines are actually stricter than Apple's. You have to explicitly consent to EVERY phone service that is accessed by an app: not just location but accelerometers, compass, notifications, wifi, phone data, etc.

                  IN BOTH CASES you have to explicitly approve of Google Maps using your location data in order to use Google Maps. There is no practical difference.

                  • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

                    by BasilBrush (643681)

                    Apple guidelines do not require apps to NOT phone home... in fact there was a big flap about that just recently... iOS apps tracking people in ways that they did not approve.

                    Wrong.

                    "4.1 Apps that do not notify and obtain user consent before collecting, transmitting, or using location data will be rejected"

                    Android app guidelines are actually stricter than Apple's. You have to explicitly consent to EVERY phone service that is accessed by an app: not just location but accelerometers, compass, notifications, wifi, phone data, etc.

                    a) It's a poorer system. It's pre-approval, on mass, which means the user doesn't know why an app needs access to resources before approving them. iOS seeks approval at the time of requiring the resource, enabling the user to know what the resource is needed for.

                    b) There is no such limitation on Google on Android, because Google don't have to do it from within an app, and ther

                    • No, I was NOT wrong.

                      "4.1 Apps that do not notify and obtain user consent before collecting, transmitting, or using location data will be rejected"

                      See, the difference there is the "user consent" bit. Repeat: Apple's guidelines do NOT require apps to not phone home. They DO require consent. Two different things.

                      My main point, however, is that apps DO phone home, without user consent, and a number of them passed through the app approval process. Hell, it was all over the internet.

                      a) It's a poorer system. It's pre-approval, on mass, which means the user doesn't know why an app needs access to resources before approving them.

                      Its the same system. Apple ALSO does not require them to not phone home. It just asks for your consent first. That's exactly what Android does.

                      iOS seeks approval at the time of requiring the resource, enabling the user to know what the resource is needed for.

                      Granted...

                    • by vlueboy (1799360)

                      a) It's a poorer system. It's pre-approval, on mass, which means the user doesn't know why an app needs access to resources before approving them. iOS seeks approval at the time of requiring the resource, enabling the user to know what the resource is needed for.

                      This.
                      I don't have IOS myself, but heard that its non-stock apps (rather, the OS API) require user approval before sending out tweets [arstechnica.com] such as an embarrassing #softwarepirateconfession resulting from your misunderstanding what the app really wanted to do. We all know how much dialogs do in the hands of Joe Bloggs, but to us here it is fair enough warning.

                      I would expect that OS protection from Android alone, and NOT Apple. The added burden [and power] placed on the user is uncharacteristic of Apple anyway. Y

              • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

                by noh8rz10 (2716597)

                ok, here's the deal. On android phones, the default browser and maps apps phone home all ur info. On iOS phones, the default browser and maps app do not phone home all ur info. This is the difference between android and iOS. agreed? now, which one sounds better to you?

                • Frankly, Android.

                  Because lots of Apple apps, guidelines or no, have been caught "phoning home" info that people certainly did not want known.

                  On Android, (A) you have to explicitly approve all such services that an app can access on your phone, in advance, and (B) unlike iOS, there are no "no competition" rules for Android apps. If you can find a better (or better for YOU) app than stock Android apps, just use it and stop using the stock Android app. Try that on Apple. You can't.

                  Granted, Apple asks
                  • Because lots of Apple apps, guidelines or no, have been caught "phoning home" info that people certainly did not want known.

                    On Android, (A) you have to explicitly approve all such services that an app can access on your phone, in advance, and (B) unlike iOS, there are no "no competition" rules for Android apps. If you can find a better (or better for YOU) app than stock Android apps, just use it and stop using the stock Android app. Try that on Apple. You can't.

                    You're confusoing two different things. App sandbox (on Android) with App Store Approvals (on iOS).

                    The problem is that iOS also has a sandbox, which you ignore. And you also ignore the fact that Android has no app approvals process.

                    Again the big picture is that third party developers can do a lot more than users don't want on Android then on iOS. And Google can do ANYTHING on Android, but they can't on iOS.

                    • You're confusoing two different things. App sandbox (on Android) with App Store Approvals (on iOS).

                      No, I'm not "confusing" or "ignoring" anything.

                      Listen up: recent scandals have demonstrated that Apple's "sandbox" DOESN'T WORK for things like this, as Chalie Miller [cnet.com] and a lot of others [informationweek.com] found out.

                      Ultimately, keeping withing Apple's "sandbox" is up to the developer, and if you have a malicious developer, it makes no difference.

                      That was part of my point. No, app developer CAN'T do a lot more on Android than they do on iOS. Lots of people keep saying that but the distinction is illusory. The ONLY dif

                    • by noh8rz10 (2716597)

                      i'm terminating this conversation, because you are being deliberately obtuse.

                    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

                      "Recent? You are linking to one that's 18 months ago, and one that's 2 years ago. Both dealt with permanently soon after discovery."

                      Of course they were. Any company worth its salt deals with malware right away. That's no guarantee that there isn't more of the same still out there. Odds are overwhelming that there is.

                      To assert that "there is no malware" in iOS is just ridiculous. There isn't a sane security researcher on the planet who would agree with that. Yet AGAIN, just recently, somebody got a trojan through the app approval process. Big deal, you say? Well, it is in a way because it is the same same basic technique used by one o

                    • My link to an example of what I was saying was modded down?

                      Fanboi modders, that's pretty low even for you.
                    • I don't have any illusions to the effect that Apple are valiantly defending my privacy... But one major difference, it seems to me, is that you get to disallow *parts* of the permissions an app requests. And you get to do it dynamically, yourself.

                      So for example I use Google maps because last time I checked Apple's still suck. But I only allow Google maps app access to my location when I actually am navigating, and otherwise I don't allow the app this access. There may be ways around that for the savvy dev,

                    • Listen up: recent scandals have demonstrated that Apple's "sandbox" DOESN'T WORK for things like this, as Chalie Miller [cnet.com] and a lot of others [informationweek.com] found out.

                      They "don't work" in the way that seat belts and airbags "don't work" by not preventing all traffic deaths. Charlie Miller was thrown out of the developer program, so apparently that bit worked anyway.

                      And developers who unlike marketers often sympathise with the customer, have remarked that Apple's store review has one gigantic advantage: When your marketing departments demands functionality that is hurting the customer, the developers can just point to Apple's review guidelines and tell the marketer tha

                    • Charlie Miller was thrown out of the developer program, so apparently that bit worked anyway.

                      No, Charlie Miller was tossed out because he was caught LATER. His app got through the vetting process AND the sandbox. As did the one by the recent researchers, which used a similar technique.

                  • by Uberbah (647458)

                    unlike iOS, there are no "no competition" rules for Android apps. If you can find a better (or better for YOU) app than stock Android apps, just use it and stop using the stock Android app. Try that on Apple. You can't.

                    Nonsense with no basis in reality. You can find no shortage of apps for browsing, music, videos, camera effects, etc for IOS devices that don't come from Apple.

                    • It is you who don't know what you're talking about.

                      Apple's rules for app store apps say that an app that is allowed in their store cannot "duplicate the functionality" of one of the major iOS components.

                      So if you make an app like iTunes, but is better than iTunes, Apple will reject it because it "duplicates functionality".

                      It's in the Developer Guidelines. Go read them. Oh, wait... you have to pay for a developer's license before they'll let you read it.
                    • It's you who's mistaken, not the other poster. The Apps Store Guidelines do not say that. You haven't read them. I have.

                      REALLY??? Well you sure haven't read them very well!

                      2.11 Apps that duplicate apps already in the App Store may be rejected, particularly if there are many of them.

                      Apple has been notorious for rejecting apps that "duplicate functionality", especially when it is their own apps that are being emulated. They have been quite selective in their enforcement. Ask any developer who ever got a rejection for violating rule 2.11.

                    • And by the way: that copy was from last year. But if they've updated it since, I sure as hell haven't heard about it. Others were complaining about it online this last August.
                  • by noh8rz10 (2716597)

                    you're being silly. stop being silly! all your args are for 3rd party apps, and we're talking about first party apps.

                    I think the "no competition" thing was an issue earlier but is no longer an issue. there are plenty of options for browser, maps, address book, camera, calendar, etc. I don't think there are options for the phone parts - phone and sms. so you need to chillax here, welcome to 2013.

                    • My whole point was about 3rd-party apps. Hell, Apple's stock apps "phone home" to Apple, too! The only difference there is that people trust Apple more than Google. Mistakenly, in my opinion.

                      Oh, don't misunderstand me. In a "societal good" contest, I'd take Apple over Google any day. But they aren't the Saints that many people seem to expect them to be.

                      But back to the point: to the best of my knowledge the Developer Guidelines still say an app can be rejected if it "duplicates the functionality" of on
                  • by ceoyoyo (59147)

                    So what you're saying is that on Android if I pop open the default maps app and ask it where I am, it pops up a dialog asking if it can use the GPS. I say yes, it tells me where I am, and then it tracks me.

                    Alternately, on iOS I open the default maps app and ask it where I am, it pops up a dialog asking if it can use the GPS (yes it does). I say yes, it tells me where I am, and then it doesn't track me.

                    For third party apps, if one DOES track me on Android no problem. If one tracks me on iOS and gets caugh

                • To put it a different way: Apple's "walled garden" isn't worth much if the "wall" is really just hot air.

                  I'm not an Apple-hater. I like OS X and I develop on Macs. I just don't like the tradeoff on iOS between "security" and freedom, because like nearly all such trades, it turns out the security is largely illusory.
                  • I just don't like the tradeoff on iOS between "security" and freedom, because like nearly all such trades, it turns out the security is largely illusory.

                    Any thoughts on why iOS malware is pretty rare in comparison to attacks on the Android platform? If the restrictions on iOS aren't somewhat related, then what is the cause of this difference? I can't see market share being the main distinguishing factor - iOS has significant market share and a solid share of online use. Given that most of the security is illusory, would you have some specific examples where freedom of use has been curtailed on the promise of increased security?

                • by lgw (121541)

                  OK, here's the deal: if you don't learn how to write, no one will take you seriously. Hey, mash whatever keys you want to, it's a formerly-free country, but if you seek credibility you should make a bit of an effort.

                  • by noh8rz10 (2716597)

                    what, no caps and a little bit of l33t-speak? chillax man. words are nothing but containers for ideas. don't judge a book by its cover.

                    • by lgw (121541)

                      Like I said, mash away to your heart's content; unless of course your intent is to persuade - then you're hostage to what each reader thinks of the cover of your book.

          • by 93 Escort Wagon (326346) on Saturday November 09, 2013 @06:04PM (#45379139)

            You can disable them and use 3rd-party tools like Waze or any of the many others.

            FYI Google bought Waze several months ago, and the two services are being integrated already. I'm seeing Google ads on Waze at times, and Waze alerts show up on Google Maps.

            • That would have been the update to Google Navigate a few months ago that showed traffic congestion, wouldn't it? It didn't used to do that... I've found it quite useful for the most part, on the occasion that I've actually needed to use navigate.

            • "FYI Google bought Waze several months ago, and the two services are being integrated already. I'm seeing Google ads on Waze at times, and Waze alerts show up on Google Maps."

              Google search has been added to Waze, and Waze alerts are now showing on Google Maps. That's it.

              If Waze ever starts "calling home" to Google, I'll stop using it. It's that simple.

          • by tlhIngan (30335)

            "for android, you're kinda screwed, because it's baked into the OS."

            No, it isn't. I'm getting pretty sick of these falsities being repeated.

            It's baked into some APPS in the OS. You aren't obligated to use them. You can disable them and use 3rd-party tools like Waze or any of the many others.

            My location tracking is off most of the time. When it is on, I use 3rd-party software. Network analysis shows that my Android phone isn't "phoning home" to Google with my location.

            I sometimes use Google Maps to find thin

        • by MacDork (560499) on Saturday November 09, 2013 @06:02PM (#45379131) Journal

          like, you want phone navigation? that requires location services.

          You can enable the GPS without using Google's location services. I used Google maps today. Location services off.

          • by noh8rz10 (2716597)

            then what is the ostensible legitimate purpose of location services?????

            • by Nerdfest (867930)

              Traffic tracking, Google now integration, etc. I get a Google now notification when my spouse (or other friends sharing their data) leave work. I get notifications if I have to leave early for something to make it on time because of traffic, etc. That sort of thing.

            • by thegarbz (1787294)

              Medium range location fixing when there's no access to GPS.

              Without location services your phone has two options, get a fix from the carrier based on the tower location (very crappy accuracy that's lucky to get you in the right suburb) or a GPS fix.

              With location services the phone will scrap all the WiFi points in the area and based on which it can see it looks up a Google database of location data to determine where you are without a GPS fix. In my house for some reason it assumes I'm 4 houses down the road

          • by Anonymous Coward

            ...there is more money to be made in tracking people than there is in selling phones to people who don't want to be tracked, so expect all industry players to continue moving in this direction.

          • by vthome (21702)

            like, you want phone navigation? that requires location services.

            You can enable the GPS without using Google's location services. I used Google maps today. Location services off.

            Don't know which version of Maps or Android you used, but the "latest" on 4.3 explicitly asks you to enable location services if you need your location or navigation. Which is, what you need Maps or Navigation for about 99% of the time.

            Side note: Looks like we all are a victim of "bait and switch". Back then when Google needed market share, they were throwing the juicy bits in, and now that they've got it, they're taking them out, one by one. The boiling frog syndrome.

            • by MacDork (560499)
              I'm using the version of maps that comes with a Nexus 5.
            • by exomondo (1725132)

              Side note: Looks like we all are a victim of "bait and switch". Back then when Google needed market share, they were throwing the juicy bits in, and now that they've got it, they're taking them out, one by one. The boiling frog syndrome.

              All the stock Android apps used to be free too and leverage AOSP features, now most of them have been abandoned and replaced with closed-source versions that use the proprietary Google Play Services features.

        • by TubeSteak (669689) on Saturday November 09, 2013 @06:20PM (#45379209) Journal

          I question Google's ability to accurately track your store habits.
          More often than not, Google Maps puts stores in the wrong place, if not the wrong side of the street.

          It's a problem that I find curious, since my Garmin GPS (which I use a lot more) gives me that problem much less often.

          • by noh8rz10 (2716597)

            but if a store's wifi ids re registered with google, then they'll know your location based on this beacon. obv works best in a home depot, not so much in a mall.

        • Just took a look at my wifes phone, and the only android setting which said it would phone home was settings -> location access -> wifi and mobile network location

          Which I have now turned off. The other services which are GPS location and access my location do not say anything about sending anything to google. The first option, wifi and mobile network detection, does.

          Probably this person article submitter does not realize that there is a setting. That its set by default is worrying however. But im sure

        • it's not that simple. it's tied to location services on a phone. like, you want phone navigation? that requires location services. you want it to show your location on a map? that requires location services. oh btdubs they also make records of your every location.

          for iOS this is pretty easy, just don't use the core google apps (maps, google search, gmail, chrome). for android, you're kinda screwed, because it's baked into the OS. Another reason to stick with iOS. I can't say anything about windows phone OS.

          It's very simple...

          When you turn on GPS, you are asked if you will allow this; not the subject in particular,
          just covered by the board meaning of the question: "will you allow tracking".

          It's an opt in, nobodies to blame but oneself if this is a problem to them.
          Many other added features coming with any phone/tablet may require an account and some even a monthly payment.

          The Android also has triangulation using wireless networks (location service) , this requires no opt-in.
          It's just not as precise, ball parks

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      and the noose tightens a little bit more...

      It should be mentioned that Google's admob transfers your location data using a constant encryption key. [ucsb.edu] According to the Snowden leaks, the NSA decided using cell tower data to track everyone's location was too inefficient and ultimately gave it up. Now I think I see why. I'm sure no one at the NSA has ever decompiled Google's code and snarfed their constant encryption keys.

      These invasive practices should be outlawed. The people working at Google should be ashamed of themselves. They are exactly what facil

    • by Anonymous Coward

      you must be new here... don't be surprised when this shows up tomorrow...

    • A duplicate? There is a way out. [slashdot.org]

    • Not only a dupe, but one of the first remark on the discussion was that, not CREDIT CARD COMPANIES already track your every purchase and visits to specific stores, and have done this for a long time.

      This is a forum of well-informed people. We would want to read about Google other things that what the PR firm hired by Microsoft spews out day in or day out.

      Either that or I am going to find another IT news forum. I want to read informed opinions, and while we still find interesting discussions here, it is beco

      • Not only a dupe, but one of the first remark on the discussion was that, not CREDIT CARD COMPANIES already track your every purchase and visits to specific stores, and have done this for a long time.

        But CREDIT CARD COMPANIES don't put adverts on my phone.

  • by clarkkent09 (1104833) on Saturday November 09, 2013 @05:15PM (#45378883)

    Since they said they "do no evil" we can all trust them completely. If it was another company I'd be worried.

    • Since they said they "do no evil" we can all trust them completely. If it was another company I'd be worried.

      This is marked funny, actually I could say the same thing and mean it.

      Have you ever searched the Internet? If any company I were to put my trust in,
      it would be Google (Pls Google, back me up on this one). Their business is the
      quest for information so you or another entity can search for and find what you/they
      want good or bad. Hell, Facebook I know them and want no part of that. I have
      0 (Zero, nada) trust in that area of the Internet. That's backed up by all the blocks
      I've setup to keep Facebook out of my co

    • Since they said they "do no evil" we can all trust them completely. If it was another company I'd be worried.

      I search for a torrent, I follow the link I know Google is aware. Now if I were to copy
      and paste that address it into a separate window Google wouldn't know.
      Woops, wrong, I have to laugh as 8.8.8.8 is my DNS Server due to it's speed.

      Google went down for a few seconds awhile ago and just over half the Internet fell silent,
      a lot of people have put their trust in Google in one way or the other.

      I guess the bottom line is read the EULA, ToS and privacy policy of who you sign on with
      or products you use and know w

  • and google obliges!!
  • It occurs to me that Google isn't mad on principle that the NSA spies on Americans using Google's data centers but instead that they're mad the NSA is riding on Google's spying coattails. Nobody likes competition I guess.
    • Nobody likes competition I guess.

      I think it's more like, "Gas, grass, or ass--nobody rides for free," myself.

    • by game kid (805301)

      It's Eric "maybe you shouldn't be doing it in the first place" Schmidt and Larry "shouting match [with Brin over more datamining]" Page we're talking about...they couldn't properly feign outrage about the NSA if the NSA found their personal sex tapes and demanded them at gunpoint.

    • by fermion (181285)
      As I said before, Google has the idea that they are the only ones who honest, professional, good enough at generating profits to so they should collect data. Collecting data just to prevent someone from blowing up downtown is just frivolous.
      • by Nerdfest (867930)

        They do seem to be one of the few that doesn't regularly leak user data. They've got a pretty decent record of keeping your private data private.

        • by ceoyoyo (59147)

          Of course. It's their most valuable asset. Their entire business is built on gathering data about you and selling products based on it. They're not going to let it get out.

          Credit card numbers? Pff. Only credit card companies have any interest in keeping those safe (and they're pretty good at not leaking them, aren't they?).

  • I'll stick with my Qualcomm QCP-1900 from 1998 - w/o a GPS chip - that just makes voice calls.

  • by bobstreo (1320787) on Saturday November 09, 2013 @05:40PM (#45379015)

    The do not track header?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Do_Not_Track [wikipedia.org]

    And Airplane mode is your friend in a store apparently.

    • by noh8rz10 (2716597)

      what if you want to make a call?

      • Re: (Score:1, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Why?

        Seriously, what did fucking people do before cell phones?

        Did the human race die out because they couldn't place phone calls any and/or everywhere?
        Fucking spoiled little babies and their phones...you deserve what you get for your weakness

        • We went to the MA-Bell/(insert local phone company here) pay phone that was on nearly every block and dropped a dime in the slot, made a call and wandered on about our business. If you were a drug dealer, or so self absorbed that you could not be out of touch you carried an ancient device known as a pager.

        • by thegarbz (1787294)

          Seriously, what did fucking people do before cell phones?

          Buy incorrect presents, get the date wrong on the card, miss things you could shop for that never made it on the grocery list, not confirm with a friend if the item you have in your hand is the same price?

          By the way what did you fucking do before you had a car? What did you do before you had electricity? What did you do before you evolved into human form?

          The old way is NOT the better way.

  • Does this depend on location data being turned on? Because I turned mine off the day I got my Android phone.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    This article is far too vague. It also conflates the anonimized location services with opt-in location sharing. Location sharing, as one would expect, is an opt-in feature to share location data with Google (as used by Google Now).

  • by smash (1351)
    *turns location services off unless using maps*. Oh look my battery life improved by about 2-3x as well.
  • Thanks Google, for sucking it dry on more things i DON'T want.

  • Right - so we're all agreed that neither android or ios fully respect our privacy?

    Great, so all we need to do is stop using their products and they'll change their ways!

    Right?

    btw my niece thinks this is totally cool

I bet the human brain is a kludge. -- Marvin Minsky

Working...