Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Internet Explorer Open Source Software Windows

Open Source Add-on Rewrites the User Interface of IE11 86

Posted by timothy
from the people-still-use-ie? dept.
An anonymous reader writes "This is how Internet Explorer would look if you move the tabs to the top like in other browsers. Developed as a design and UX study, the open source add-on replaces the default navigation bar and combines three traditionally separate toolbars into one. The UX project started in 2004 to demonstrate that it is feasible to combine the address, search, and find box into one. Additionally, Quero offers a variety of customization options for IE, including making the UI themeable or starting Microsoft's desktop browser always maximized."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Open Source Add-on Rewrites the User Interface of IE11

Comments Filter:
  • I find this a good case when I'm intrigued just to see a dev's talent showcased but can't imagine staying on ie beyond that though
  • Turns out... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by aardvarkjoe (156801) on Saturday December 21, 2013 @04:31AM (#45752409)

    This is how Internet Explorer would look if you move the tabs to the top like in other browsers.

    Turns out that it would look pretty much the same as the other browsers. Thanks timothy, I never could have figured that one out!

    • Re:Turns out... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Blakey Rat (99501) on Saturday December 21, 2013 @05:42AM (#45752507)

      It's *really* hard to give a shit about this "story". Hey, special news report, you can change IE's look, whoop-de-shit!

      • by dkleinsc (563838)

        I couldn't agree more: The story amounts to "Browser plugin does something that the author really wanted. Film at 11."

        I mean, why would it be news if some guy had written a Firefox plugin to do the opposite?

        • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

          Well, the technical achievement of finding a way to polish a turd has to count for something.

    • by Cenan (1892902)

      post to undo mod.

    • It's not that one anachronism either.

      The UX project started in 2004 to demonstrate that it is feasible to combine the address, search, and find box into one.

      Maybe in 2004 that would be interesting but seeing as that's default behavior for both IE and Chrome I don't really see the novelty. If anything this toolbar is regressive. "Hey check out these browser UI concepts that have already been tried and either discarded or adopted."

    • Makes me wonder where it put them before. Spiraling out from the lower right corner?

  • Why? (Score:4, Informative)

    by bankman (136859) on Saturday December 21, 2013 @04:41AM (#45752429) Homepage

    This is how Internet Explorer would look if you move the tabs to the top like in other browsers.

    I have yet to understand the reason for the UI change in the other browsers.

    • There are a couple of reasons.

      As a starter, I remember an interview from way back in the aughties when where they asked an IE designer for his thoughts on the Firefox browser, which was at that point really cutting into IE market share. I remember one comment along the lines of "really good browser: the only thing I would change is to put tabs on top. The address bar and everything else only affects the current tab, so you want tabs on top to give the impression that each tab is like its own, separate brows

  • Stupid Positioning (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 21, 2013 @05:00AM (#45752455)

    Put the tabs underneath the bookmarks toolbar (just above the webpage you're viewing) where they make sense, then we can talk about maybe using the browser again.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Badooleoo (3045733)

      I can not agree more with this. Tabs are for the page you are viewing not the menu, address bar, search bar, navigation buttons, bookmarks or anything else that is browser wide.

      Also having tabs at the top messes with hovering and accessing remote desktop bars and operating system docks like object dock if you have it at the top (which is the default).

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Navigation (back, forward, refresh, and home) and the address bar all control the state of the current page you are viewing, not the browser as a whole.

        • by phluid61 (2501032)
          +1 parent insightful, someone, please.
        • AC missed the point.

          Navigation is used across the whole browser

          Tabs are to choose pages/sessions. You don't change your navigation platform when you select another tab.

          At least in Firefox there is a workaround in about:config

    • I use FF and place the tabs in the sidebar. Works nice when I have more tabs open then screen width

  • by caspy7 (117545) on Saturday December 21, 2013 @05:14AM (#45752467)

    I feel like my response is supposed to be "Ohh! That's what it would look like if it were different!"
    But the reality is that I didn't have much of an idea of what it looks like now.

  • everything I never wanted in a browser UI

  • I'm still confused why everyone insists on dumping the menus and buttons on the TOP of the browser window. Web site design, for various reasons, tends to follow a fairly vertical layout: You scroll up and down to get at more content, with little to no side-to-side scrolling. Our screens, on the other hand, tend toward horizontal layouts, with aspect ratios getting increasingly wide.

    It makes no sense for us to put menu bars at the top when we could put them at the right hand side, and the content in a narrow

    • I'm still confused why everyone insists on dumping the menus and buttons on the TOP of the browser window. Web site design, for various reasons, tends to follow a fairly vertical layout: You scroll up and down to get at more content, with little to no side-to-side scrolling. Our screens, on the other hand, tend toward horizontal layouts, with aspect ratios getting increasingly wide.

      It makes no sense for us to put menu bars at the top when we could put them at the right hand side, and the content in a narrower, taller window. We'd see more relevant content on our web pages, it keeps the tabs closer to the scroll bar, and minimize/maximize/close buttons are close by as well. Vertical pixels are valuable. Horizontal ones are cheap. Make the buttons and tabs use cheap pixels, please.

      Unless your coding a browser where you want a consistent UI on a mobile device as well where horizontal pixels are far more precious...

    • Personally, I like the obsession with menu bars at the top and bottom. It ensures that applications aren't hungry for additional monitor width, which means I can actually run two of them side-by-side on the same monitor. If they start making use of that additional width then I'll no longer be able to do that.

      Menus on the left or right also take up far more pixels than menus on the top or bottom simply because text is written left to right. So applications that use menus on the left or right easily eat aw

  • they plan to re-engineer the Flu virus to come in pastel colors and to manufacture vitamin D.

    -

  • It never fails to amaze me that no one seems to get the negative security implications of an integrated url/search bar, especially given the underwear knots some smart people seem to get over truly esoteric 1 in a billion use case vulnerabilities.

    If the URL bar performs search, it is ripe for a mistyped URL to lead you to a fishing site (hell, bad guys don't even need to register every typo iteration in DNS anymore, they can just pollute search results; it's like DNS hijacking made simple.) I have seen my

  • Yeah, it looks different, but it still squeals, smells, and acts like a pig.

  • Maybe it's just the Windows theme, but I found the screenshots disorienting. I could not tell the difference between the tab itself and the location input box.

  • Can we have a similar FOSS to make Windows 8 look like Windows 7, or whatever else we want it to look like?
  • IE only necessary and useful for MS updates. Chrome useful for google applications, such as google drive. Firefox remains OS, OEM, and platform agnostic. So anyone trying to hack "IE" to be a better browser, and IE 11 at that, is drinking the Redmond's kool-aid.
  • I use Firefox and not IE, so this add-on doesn't even effect me, but the first thing that I do on a new Firefox install is set "browser.tabs.onTop" to false in about:config.

He's dead, Jim.

Working...