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Jesse Jackson To Take On Silicon Valley's Lack of Diversity 397

Posted by Soulskill
from the equality-in-industry dept.
New submitter wyattstorch516 writes "San Jose Mecury News reports that Jesse Jackson will lead a delegation to HP's next board meeting to discuss the hiring of technology companies in regard to African-Americans and Latinos. 'About one in 14 tech workers is black or Latino both in the Silicon Valley and nationally. Blacks and Hispanics make up 13.1 and 16.9 percent of the U.S. population, respectively, according to the most recent Census data.' Jackson sent a letter to HP, Apple, Google, Twitter, Facebook, and others about meeting to discuss diversity issues."
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Jesse Jackson To Take On Silicon Valley's Lack of Diversity

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  • Fuck that guy. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by jcr (53032) <[jcr] [at] [mac.com]> on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @05:36PM (#46528027) Journal

    Seriously, I was sick of his guilt-peddling bullshit decades ago.

    -jcr

    • Unjust (Score:5, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @05:42PM (#46528083)

      When you think of all the good people that suffered long, painful deaths from cancer this year, it is simply a travesty of justice that Jackson was not one of them.

    • Re:Fuck that guy. (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @05:42PM (#46528089)

      there is probably a more nuanced discussion to be had about affirmative action

      but having been in the hiring seat, I can tell you that almost every single
      applicant is white and male, and very few of those are actually qualified

      so unless Jackson thinks HP should hire unqualified people just because
      they are black or latino, he should probably focus his efforts earlier
      in the pipeline

      • Re:Fuck that guy. (Score:5, Insightful)

        by jcr (53032) <[jcr] [at] [mac.com]> on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @05:44PM (#46528121) Journal

        "affirmative action"? That's nothing but a euphemism for racial discrimination. Here in California, it amounted to a modern-day Chinese Exclusion Act to fuck over Asian kids applying to the cal state universities.

        -jcr

        • Re:Fuck that guy. (Score:5, Interesting)

          by AlphaWolf_HK (692722) on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @05:55PM (#46528261)

          Pretty much. I've had arguments with a lot of people over affirmative action, and 95% of the time they think it helps Asians get a job and education. Basically they think it helps everybody but whites, and they themselves are huge advocates of white guilt. They quickly shut up once I show them facts about how affirmative action actually fucks over Asians pretty bad, in fact it screws them much worse than white people, mainly because they have an even higher interest in higher education and the high tech career fields than whites do while being an even smaller portion of the population than blacks.

          The problem with affirmative action is it assumes that a given percent of every race is interested in x career or y school, but that just doesn't reflect reality one bit. Take music for example; by far more black people are into rap, but there's nothing inherent about rap that makes them like it more or white people like it less. The underlying cause of this schism is a simple cultural difference. The same thing is likely to cause them to be less interested in IT careers, so they don't even apply for those jobs.

          • Re:Fuck that guy. (Score:5, Interesting)

            by gandhi123 (1173413) on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @06:25PM (#46528539)

            "The problem with affirmative action is it assumes that a given percent of every race is interested in x career or y school, but that just doesn't reflect reality one bit. "

            It's not just this. Even when black students are interested in STEM careers, affirmative action puts them in a position where their white and Asian classmates are much better prepared and capable to handle difficult STEM classes. As a result they get poor grades, feel demoralized, and transfer to easier majors. This is called the "mismatch problem."

            http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03... [nytimes.com]

            Recently, economists from Duke studied the effects of Prop 209, comparing undergraduate graduation rates for blacks, Hispanics and American Indians before and after the ban. In a paper being considered for publication by The Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Duke economists conclude that mismatch effects are strongest for students in so-called STEM majors — science, technology, engineering and math. These subjects proceed in a more regimented way than the humanities, with each topic and class building on what came before. If you don’t properly learn one concept, it’s easier to get knocked off track.

            The Duke economists say that lower-ranked schools in the University of California system are better at graduating minority students in STEM majors. For example, they conclude that had the bottom third of minority students at Berkeley who hoped to graduate with a STEM major gone to Santa Cruz instead, they would have been almost twice as likely to earn such a degree.

            and

            http://blogs.sciencemag.org/sc... [sciencemag.org]

            More Evidence that Admissions Preferences Discourage Minority Students from Majoring in STEM

            Recently Science Careers commented on Mismatch, a provocative and persuasive new book that examines the effects of giving large admissions preferences to minority college students. One of the unintended consequences of such measures, write authors Richard Sander and Stuart Taylor, Jr., is to steer minority students away from majoring in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. This happens, they argue, because large preferences encourage students to attend colleges where their academic credentials place them toward the bottom of their college classes. Science majors, however, overwhelmingly come from the upper end of their college classes, regardless of where they go to college. Students admitted with large preferences--as many African American and Hispanic students are--are therefore deprived of the realistic opportunity to earn STEM degrees.

        • Cheer up. When you begin losing jobs and college entrances to those less qualified, your people have finally made it. Wear as a badge of competence that things need not be set aside for you.

          And Jessie? If I were an American of African descent, I wouldn't vote for, er, ... never mind.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by ackthpt (218170)

        there is probably a more nuanced discussion to be had about affirmative action

        but having been in the hiring seat, I can tell you that almost every single
        applicant is white and male, and very few of those are actually qualified

        so unless Jackson thinks HP should hire unqualified people just because
        they are black or latino, he should probably focus his efforts earlier
        in the pipeline

        What Jesse seems unaware of is there's a very small pool of qualified "diverse candidates" and they are generally snapped up pronto by employers who want to be able to compete for contracts where a stipulation favors an employer with diverse employees.

        Mr. Jackson seems rooted in an age that has long since gone by. What he needs to do is tell the people he claims to represent, "pull up your damn pants, don't get ugly tattoos all over your body, learn to address people in respectful language and study your a

        • Re:Fuck that guy. (Score:4, Insightful)

          by NemosomeN (670035) on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @07:04PM (#46528917) Journal

          "It's not because of racism, it's because black people sag their pants, get tattoos*, are disrespectful, and lazy."

          Oh, okay.

          *Side note, I work in a non-technical white collar job, and a surprising number of my colleagues have tattoos.

          • by ackthpt (218170)

            "It's not because of racism, it's because black people sag their pants, get tattoos*, are disrespectful, and lazy."

            Oh, okay.

            *Side note, I work in a non-technical white collar job, and a surprising number of my colleagues have tattoos.

            Tats aside, how many pull their pants up and speak clear and proper English when it comes to interviews? I don't think we'd feel much compulsion to grand our time to interview someone who can't make the effort.

            If you must have tats, keep them clean or covered during work. Customers sometimes roam cubeville or the shop and may be offended - that's the word from the top.

            • Re:Fuck that guy. (Score:4, Insightful)

              by epyT-R (613989) on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @08:09PM (#46529473)

              Maybe it's time that interviewers stopped judging people on irrelevancies like clothing style.

              • Maybe it's time that interviewees realized that it's not just about them. Acting slovenly has a pretty good chance to offend other people, no matter how good it may or may not make you feel inside.
          • *Side note, I work in a non-technical white collar job, and a surprising number of my colleagues have tattoos.

            It might be a generational thing. I personally think (thought) tattoos were very unprofessional, but the younger generation seems to have them -- a lot. One of the kids in the group (he's probably pushing 30) has tats nearly everywhere visible. I'm extremely glad they didn't discriminate against him when it came to hiring. He's change my mind on people with tats.

            • Thing is, the tattoo trend is inevitably going to fade away, leaving all these dupes with their bodies covered in "art."

              "Like, every single tat has a deep significance to me man. Like this Monster drink logo. That represents my susceptibility to advertisement and that my identity is tied up in what brands are cool or best. It's deep, man, you just don't get it. I'm going to get a yin yang on my forearm because, it's like, deep and I have no idea what cliche or trite means. I'm an individual, man. All

        • A friend of mine who is Hispanic, as in emigrated from El Salvador, and both degreed and competent in IT almost can't not work.
          In fact he works for HP currently.

        • by slew (2918)

          The person that seems to have the most alignment with this message is Bill Cosby.

          Sadly, many of the young'ns don't know much about him... Maybe his new show [rollingstone.com] can provide a platform for his message.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Tailhook (98486)

        hire unqualified people just because they are black or latino

        If minority candidates aren't qualified then the problem is unfairly tough and racially biased requirements. Get your mind right.

        • by ackthpt (218170)

          hire unqualified people just because they are black or latino

          If minority candidates aren't qualified then the problem is unfairly tough and racially biased requirements. Get your mind right.

          More H1Bs on the way - to people who don't have any problem whatsoever with learning to make it in a country thousands of miles from home.

          It's a funny old world, isn't it?

        • by Baloroth (2370816)

          hire unqualified people just because they are black or latino

          If minority candidates aren't qualified then the problem is unfairly tough and racially biased requirements. Get your mind right.

          Or minorities aren't following the education or career paths to become qualified even under reasonable requirements. This could be because of cultural bias among the minority group or bias against the minority group in the education system.

          I'm not even sure what "unfairly tough and racially biased requirements" means (aside from the obvious "you must be white to apply", which seems... well, unlikely): if some people are qualified (no matter their race), than it doesn't seem to be unfairly tough... unless y

          • Re:Fuck that guy. (Score:5, Insightful)

            by Tailhook (98486) on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @07:48PM (#46529305)

            I'm not even sure what "unfairly tough and racially biased requirements" means

            Unfairly tough and racially biased requirements are whatever is required of or tested for among people that are employed by some segment of the workforce that exhibits an incorrect ratio of racial participation.

            For example, since New York fire department minority applicants tended to fail the entrance exam at a higher rate than white applicants the entrance examine is, by definition, racially biased [go.com]. When medical school requirements are found to impede racial quotas the solution is to create separate standards [aamc.org] by race that specify "adjusted" MCAT and GPA figures to correct for systemic bias. The fact that the scores required of black/latino students are significantly lower than those of white/asian students DOES NOT INDICATE A LOWERING OF STANDARDS. Oh no. Rather, the lower score reflect the degree of inherent racial bias in the education system.

            Got it?

            The IT industry has escaped the good graces of contemporary racial justice for too long, as illustrated by your naivety. We welcome the good Reverend Jackson to the den of racial iniquity that is Silicon Valley and we look forward to the application of racial fairness we know he'll provide, and we're certain you do as well.

      • Working as a dev in finance for +10 years, now, diversity is not a problem. Whites may make up a significant portion of development staff (and they also make up over 80% of the population in the US), but they're almost equaled in numbers by Indians. Oriental Asians (as opposed to subcontinent) also make up for significant chunk (I've worked with people from China, Japan, Korea, Cambodia & Vietnam - and those are just the nationalities I know/remember). I've worked with a few blacks, fewer African-Ameri

      • Re:Fuck that guy. (Score:5, Informative)

        by Salo2112 (628590) on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @08:52PM (#46529839)

        so unless Jackson thinks HP should hire unqualified people just because they are black or latino, he should probably focus his efforts earlier in the pipeline

        He does.

      • Jessie Jackson doesn't care about affirmative action. He's a crook and a con-man. If there's anything that's holding African Americans back in this country (I mean besides racism), it's their seeming indifference to Jessie Jacksons and even worse, Al Sharptons (who should be in prison) complete charlatanry. Both of those men are clearly con men and bad ones at that. I don't think Obama's a very good president but at least there's finally a decent black leader that's also a good roll model. My son is black a

      • Re:Fuck that guy. (Score:4, Informative)

        by CapOblivious2010 (1731402) on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @11:55PM (#46530951)

        so unless Jackson thinks HP should hire unqualified people just because they are black or latino, he should probably focus his efforts earlier in the pipeline

        I doubt that's what he thinks - he doesn't actually care about black or latino people. He just wants the publicity, and some sort of "fund for underprivileged nerds" to be set up, which he can then "administer" in a way that benefits him and his friends. Shakedown, plain and simple.

    • Re:Fuck that guy. (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @05:44PM (#46528123)

      I agree. If a person is qualified, ill hire him regardless of race. Just because you are black or latino you should not get any special treatment. If we do let unqualified people in, then it perpetuates the problem by highlighting their lack of skill.

      • Re:Fuck that guy. (Score:4, Insightful)

        by Frobnicator (565869) on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @06:22PM (#46528513) Journal

        I agree. If a person is qualified, ill hire him regardless of race. Just because you are black or latino you should not get any special treatment. If we do let unqualified people in, then it perpetuates the problem by highlighting their lack of skill.

        Great!

        When I graduated from my university, it was almost entirely a blend of american white and asian males in the program. We had 3 white women, 2 black males, and no latinos, in a graduating class of about 70 people. One of the graduation speakers made special point of it in the commencement address when discussing issues in diversity in our field.

        When I am in a position to interview people for our engineering jobs, over the past ten years I recall exactly one female applicant with the mandatory degrees and certifications. We see mostly white males, some Asian males (mostly from India and China) and a handful of others. That isn't because we are refusing to interview minorities, it is because those are the people who have the mandatory certifications. I cannot find any solid statistics on the racial distributions of people with engineering certifications, but I'd assume they are similarly skewed.

        If he wants to address diversity in our field, he needs to look at those entering the program. If he wants more people in the job, help give them the proper educational background and other certifications required to enter the field.

        • "If he wants to address diversity in our field, he needs to look at those entering the program. If he wants more people in the job, help give them the proper educational background and other certifications required to enter the field. "

          The affirmative action policies Jackson supports actually reduces the number of blacks who end up with engineering degrees.

          Even when black students are interested in STEM careers, affirmative action puts them in a position where their white and Asian classmates are much bette

        • When I am in a position to interview people for our engineering jobs, over the past ten years I recall exactly one female applicant with the mandatory degrees and certifications. We see mostly white males, some Asian males (mostly from India and China) and a handful of others. That isn't because we are refusing to interview minorities, it is because those are the people who have the mandatory certifications. I cannot find any solid statistics on the racial distributions of people with engineering certifications, but I'd assume they are similarly skewed.

          In 10 years of interviewing for development/testing positions, I have never once seen a resume for a female. Not once. I've seen pretty much every race under the sun (excepting those hiding out in the most inaccessible portions of the earth), and I've given them a fair shake. This is not my fault: I give broad technical requirements to the HR recruiters: knows languages x, y & z (z optional, but a bonus). bonus if they know database a.

          I want someone that can do the job. Can they do my job when I'm out

      • Re:Fuck that guy. (Score:5, Insightful)

        by ackthpt (218170) on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @06:23PM (#46528519) Homepage Journal

        I agree. If a person is qualified, ill hire him regardless of race. Just because you are black or latino you should not get any special treatment. If we do let unqualified people in, then it perpetuates the problem by highlighting their lack of skill.

        If you do bring in unqualified people, regardless of demographic, you'll find your qualified people frustrated with having to help them all the time and resenting they get paid the same as people who do half the work.

        damned if you do... damned if you don't

    • Unfortunately, the diversity of the population does not equal diversification in job skills.

      This is a repeat of Equal Oppertunity and job quota's from 2 decades ago. In the 70's I had a job with a TS clearance in a technical field and I noted the stark lack of some ethnic groups. I asked my employer about this ethnic bias toward White. He showed me the stack of applications. Minorities very rarely applied or even trained in the high tech trades.

      Due to affirmative action in the 80's by t US Goverment, a

    • Re:Fuck that guy. (Score:4, Insightful)

      by msauve (701917) on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @07:47PM (#46529297)
      Why doesn't he go after the NBA? They have way more than a proportionate 17% African-Americans. They must be racists.
    • Seriously, I was sick of his guilt-peddling bullshit decades ago.

      It isn't a question of guilt. It is a question of demographics.

      In the future the biggest demographic change in the U.S. is the rise of the majority-minority, an odd concept that shows that we still haven't gotten over the ides that white males are the norm and everyone else is a stranger.
      To thrive domestically as well as globally, being multicultural is essential.

      How Will Changing Demographics in the U.S, Influence Business In the Coming Decade? [wsj.com]

      The geek would probably agree that the Republican Party is slowly losing ground as a national force because it is too white, male, inbred and insular. He probably knows that the conflict between the poor and middle class of San Francisco runs deeper than gentrification,

      But he refuses to draw any larger conclusions from the evidence which surrounds him.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @05:37PM (#46528045)

    Black culture doesn't reward or encourage intelligence.

    • by nehumanuscrede (624750) on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @06:06PM (#46528367)
      "Black culture doesn't reward or encourage intelligence.
      "

      To be honest, AMERICAN culture doesn't either. Is why celebrities, athletes, and entertainers are paid dump truck loads of cash while the really intelligent folks ( scientists, reaearchers, you know folks who actually create the world as we know it today ) are compensated at a much lower level.

      Given that, if you're growing up in America are you going to strive to be a math whiz or a pro-athlete ? Which gives you the ideal " American " lifestyle ?

      Here in the good ol US of A, we glorify a lot of things: War, wealth, and power to name but a few. Intelligence is way, Way, WAY down the list.

      In fact, if you're TOO good at say, Math, in school, you become a target and an outcast because you don't fit in with the cool crowd folks now. Your life will become a living hell.
      • by schnell (163007) <me&schnell,net> on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @10:20PM (#46530475) Homepage

        Black culture doesn't reward or encourage intelligence.

        To be honest, AMERICAN culture doesn't either.

        The first statement is racist and the second is incorrect. The correct statement is that "poor and lower-to-middle class culture doesn't reward or encourage intelligence."

        I will bet you anything that the exact same premium on intelligence and achievement is shared among white, black and hispanic families in wealthy Orange County CA suburbs; while the same lack of interest is expressed among poor black families in Philadelphia, latino families in East LA and poor white families in Arkansas. I grew up solidly middle class but from my youngest years it was just understood that I *would* go to college, no excuses otherwise. I would like to think that I would have gone to college because of my intelligence and interests no matter what my upbringing ... but who knows?

        Sadly, this is a self-perpetuating theme that increases the economic divide in the US over time. I am certainly no fan of affirmative action but the situation does imply that a lack of an initial "hand up" to reach the economic and educational status that will value intelligence is a strong barrier to making that part of the culture. You generally have to get your head above water before you can see that there is land there, and the value of education and upward mobility is usually hidden from those who have never glimpsed it because it's just alien to their experience.

    • by aurizon (122550) <bill.jackson@gmail.AUDENcom minus poet> on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @06:26PM (#46528547)

      Actually, black culture penalizes anyone black who allows his/her intelligence to get them ahead. Any child who does so is beaten and bullied by the other black kids, so they learn to hide their abilities and blend in. Some emerge and excell, but sadly, too many are lost to the lifestyle.
      As a retired teacher, I have seen this and it is hard to eliminate, and if you try, it is risky.

      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Actually, black culture penalizes anyone black who allows his/her intelligence to get them ahead. Any child who does so is beaten and bullied by the other black kids, so they learn to hide their abilities and blend in. Some emerge and excell, but sadly, too many are lost to the lifestyle. As a retired teacher, I have seen this and it is hard to eliminate, and if you try, it is risky.

        AC to preserve mods. I really, really don't want to agree with this. It seems like a topic better suited for the 1950's than the 2010's. But, I have seen it happen firsthand at a goddammed university. In grad school, one of the most brilliant people I knew was a blerd, his dad was an engineer and his mom was a nurse, the guy was doing calculus since age 8. I saw him get treated like garbage by his undergrads (he was teaching at the time) because he was a huge black guy who refused to conform to what the

      • by CanHasDIY (1672858) on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @07:02PM (#46528905) Homepage Journal

        Actually, black culture penalizes anyone black who allows his/her intelligence to get them ahead. Any child who does so is beaten and bullied by the other black kids, so they learn to hide their abilities and blend in.

        As an outwardly Caucasian male* who grew up in the rural backwoods of Missouri and went to school with a 99.9% Caucasian student body, I can assure you that being bullied for showing intelligence is far from being a "black problem."

        * Being a solid 1/4 Blackfoot, I prefer to think of myself as a "mud race."

        • Hey, I went to Pleasant View, Hillcrest, and later Glendale. Yeah, it wasn't the best place in the world to be known as the smart kid. That made for some long, unpleasant bus rides home.
        • by aurizon (122550)

          So that .1% fellow blackfooted persecuted you? Or the white rednecks.

          I was referring the the sad fact of black males persecuting other black males who show any ability to study, read etc.
          In some areas there is enough teacher presence in halls, yards and stairwells to curtail this bullying in school. Many places have had wages taken so high that there is insufficient teacher presence in halls, yards and stairwells that bullying flourishes in these areas, and this bullying chills many black students into medi

          • by slew (2918)

            I think this is part of the problem in Africa, working hard, studying are seen as bad white traits.

            You literally have no idea about Africa if you make that kind of statement.

            It's a bit anecdotal, but I know several people (about 1/2 of them "white/mixed") who grew up in Kenya, South Africa, and Nigeria. According to them, most people in Africa don't even think about "whites". The biggest problems in Africa today are corruption and war. There are plenty of smart people in most countries there, but they have no access to good schools or jobs. Given the economic situation, many have to work very hard ju

            • by aurizon (122550)

              Yes, I agree. I was too general. The problems I spoke of are country specific, but there are several of them.
              A friend of mine was a prof in Zimbabwe, prior to the advent of black corrupt rule. He told me stories and why he eventually became an expat.
              That crooked ruler is one whereof I speak.
              The breakdown of society by men with guns who want kids to project their power is also a big problem. Those kids get ruined for any normal life, unlimited booze, hookers and drugs while young with a gun tends to do that

  • Show us. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @05:40PM (#46528065)

    Maybe Jesse should start his own company, hire strictly based on race, and compete.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @05:40PM (#46528071)

    Just not his minorities, queue the shakedown parade.

    • by Zordak (123132)

      Just not his minorities, queue the shakedown parade.

      Exactly. I went to a technical conference for one of my clients. There were a lot of very smart engineers and scientists there. Caucasian males were a decided minority. Most of them were Chinese or Indian, including many women. The Reverend Jesse Jackson needs to direct his white hate somewhere else.

  • by enterix (5252) on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @05:41PM (#46528081)

    He just wants Jessie Jr to find decent job after he's out of prison...

    • His father is already a great role model: Become a preacher, knock up an intern, rinse and repeat.

  • Education... (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Luthair (847766) on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @05:43PM (#46528099)

    Seems like this would be an education issue not a hiring issue. e.g. are there really a lot of underemployed / unemployed black or hispanics with CS degrees?

    I suspect the tech industry has a high percentage of minorities due to Indians and other Asians ethnicity.

  • Not Our Fault (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Gre7g (801284) <gre7g.luterman@gma[ ]com ['il.' in gap]> on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @05:43PM (#46528107) Homepage

    I've been in the tech industry (software, circuit board design, chip design, and then back to software) for 24 years. I've worked with engineers with heritage from India, China, Korea, various eastern European countries, and probably a couple other countries in Asia. I've never had a black or latino co-worker. In all those years, I've only ever seen us interview a single black candidate, and he so inadequate that he got sent home after speaking with a single interviewer.

    Hiring is not the problem. A lack of black and latino candidates worth hiring is.

    • I have had a few black coworkers. Perfectly competent individuals who were good to work with. Their jobs were also practically guaranteed as they survived multiple waves of layoffs because the department managers like the boost they provide to their diversity numbers.

      I would be really interested in seeing the number of unemployed black tech workers with BS degrees or better. I doubt there are many.

  • Good. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Karmashock (2415832) on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @05:50PM (#46528185)

    I think everyone should be subjected to this race baiting bullshit as consistently and aggressively as possible.

    This is the solution to people like this... they exploit white guilt. And in exploiting it, they use it up.

    Look at this very forum... look at all the people saying "f this guy"... exactly. Those are the people that are already tapped out of guilt.

    I'm amongst them of course. But not everyone has gotten there yet. Let Al run rampant... Everyone he comes into contact with will be inoculated against his tactics.

    • "Let the bigots speak their minds - they're a hell of a lot easier to avoid when you know who they are."

      -- This guy

      • Are you suggesting I am a bigot or that Al is one? Its not entirely clear and while you might think its self evident, I've had people answer both ways in this context.

        • by Amtrak (2430376)
          Not sure if it matters who he thinks the bigot is. If he thinks it you at least he will avoid you. :D
        • Al.

          Calling someone out on their bigotry is not bigotry within itself; stay the course, bruddah.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @05:51PM (#46528189)

    So do we know the diversity situation for Jesse's organization? Just curious, as I have no idea what the situation is.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Cracker-Jackin Jackson is at it again, let no company fail to donate to the cause lest they be labelled racist and boycotted. Rainbow Push must need more money to pay off another staffer he knocked up.

  • I dont have a problem with Jesse Jackson...

    I **do** have a problem with this reductive, tone-deaf initiative of his...this program won't improve anything.

    Just as with the lack of women in tech, the lack of racial diversity is a ***symptom of a greater problem*** and trying to hit some sort of abstract "number" is ridiculous.

    The problem goes all the way back to middle school & all the way up through funding for graduate research. We don't know how to **teach technology**...partially because of misperceptions of how the industry works. Steve Jobs as "technology genius" is a perfect example. Jobs was a 'genius' at marketing & dealmaking. He applied innovation to opening new markets & had the vision to see potentials. These are great traits, but have ***nothing to do with actual computing***

    The misperceptions influence organizaitonal decisions...which influences academia...which just reinforces the cycle of bad theory/practice.

    Diversity is an evolutionary advantage, but it's **two steps** beyond fixing right now...tech's problems are systemic and hitting some artificial quota will not help fix things!!!

    First step is to acknowledge we have a problem & start talking about refining + improving how we explain tech to non-techs and students...and integrating those improvements into our systems naturally.

    It's sort of a "healing algorythm" that has to go throughout the whole system to optimize.

  • should go after outsourcing and H-B1 they are the real killers of work.

  • My experience has been that IT is more color blind than many other departments in large companies I've worked at. The problem is lack of qualified job candidates. Hiring somebody or giving them preferential treatment in the hiring process based on their race or skin color is discrimination.

    Stop affirmative action.
  • by Dimwit (36756) on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @06:07PM (#46528377)

    I've worked in tech for 15-20 years now. Since about 2005, I've sat on interview panels.

    In all that time, I've interviewed maybe three black people (two of whom ended up getting hired). Same with women. It wasn't that we were intentionally ignoring resumes we thought were from black people or women, we just simply did not ever get them.

    I went to college at a school that had a large black student body (although it wouldn't be classified under the "Historically Black College" scheme). Looking at their website, the college is 52% white, 27% black, 10% hispanic white, 3% Asian. However, in my CS101 class (~50 students), it was all white and Asian guys and one white girl (who ended up changing majors).

    The high school I went to was roughly 50/50 black/white, but my AP Computer Science class in high school was 100% white. There was actually a pretty good split of girls and boys, though (it was the only "computer" class that offered honors credit, so there was an attraction to people who wanted high class-placement even if they weren't interested in CS).

    So yeah. While I don't doubt some corporations are biased in their hiring practices, there also just aren't a lot of black of female applicants, and not a lot of black and/or female CS graduates. I don't know how to address that end of the problem.

    • by AaronW (33736) on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @09:29PM (#46530109) Homepage

      It's the same here. I have interviewed a number of qualified women and work with several excellent female engineers but I have never interviewed an African American. I don't care what a person's background is, if they're qualified for the position then they'll be hired. The best candidate I ever interviewed was a transgendered Russian. Everyone who interviewed her recommended her and we made an offer. Sadly she didn't join.

      Sadly most candidates I interview are not qualified. When I ask basic questions that anyone with a decent CS or CE degree should be able to answer they fall flat on their face regardless of race and these are for more senior positions.

  • You're kidding me, right? If there is one industry that is by its very nature not racist it's IT. Xenophobia simply doesn't work out if half your coworkers are hailing from abroad. You have all sorts of people working together, the whole thing reeks of favoritism.

    Or, in other words, Mr. Jackson trying to play the race card in an attempt to guilt-trip.

  • by serbanp (139486) on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @06:10PM (#46528417)

    awesome MADTv sketch?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]

  • Here [cra.org] is data for C.S. and C.E. bachelors degree recipients in the U.S. See page 5. About 8.7% of degrees were awarded to blacks and Hispanics, which is about one out of 11. So Silicon Valley isn't far off what one would expect based purely on # of degrees awarded. A significant portion of bay area tech workers are likely immigrants to the United States and got their degrees elsewhere. This group likely contains very few blacks and Hispanics. So, if the discussion were limited to Silicon Valley workers
  • Exclusionary zoning (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Ichijo (607641)
    To this day, many cities continue to use exclusionary zoning [wikipedia.org] to keep minority groups out of certain neighborhoods. In Silicon Valley, is density tightly controlled? Are minimum parking requirements in place? If so, this could help explain Silicon Valley's lack of diversity.
    • by metlin (258108)

      What lack of diversity? Just because it's not diverse in the way he wants it (blacks and Latinos) doesn't mean it's not diverse. It's got plenty of racial diversity -- Indians, Chinese, Koreans, even South Americans and Eastern Europeans.

    • by xevioso (598654)

      That, or the fact that it is very expensive to live there.

      And there are black enclaves in Silicon Valley...East Palo Alto has roughly the same amount of black folks as white folks...

  • by Trailer Trash (60756) on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @06:18PM (#46528477) Homepage

    But, before hitting Silicon Valley, why not make a stop by the NBA?

    I mean, asians and whites are dramatically underrepresented there. I'm sure you see this as a big problem, too.

    Right, Jesse?

    Um, Jesse?

  • by organgtool (966989) on Wednesday March 19, 2014 @06:18PM (#46528483)
    Everyone in the article keeps saying that Jackson is "shining a spotlight" on the problem. Is he really? He pointed out the lack of blacks and latinos in the tech industry and did fuck-all to state what he believes to be the problem and what we can do to resolve it. If he had come out with figures that showed that there were tons of unemployed or underployed blacks and latinos in the tech industry and that the underlying problem is due to discrimination, then that would give us something to work with. But that doesn't seem to be the case at all. What does he expect these companies to do? Hire underqualified people just to get the numbers to match?

    This sounds like what my dad was telling me the other day. He used to work for the federal government and they had very detailed lists of minorities in each department. Every department was often under stress to get their numbers to match percentage of populations. But what population do you go by? National? Regional? Many of these departments were more focused on meeting these quotas than hiring the most qualified candidates, so overall these systems are counterproductive.

    And if we're so focused on quotas of fairness, should we put a quota that only 13.9% of NFL players should be black? The fact is that Mr. Jackson did a lot of good when qualified black people couldn't find work due directly to discrimination. And while discrimination may not be completely gone, it is a lot better than it used to be and not every case of underrepresentation today is due to discrimination. So keep fighting the good fight against discrimination, but if you're going to complain about underrepresentation and completely fail to show that it is a result of discrimination rather than a lack of interest or qualification, then you can kindly STFU.
  • PBS program last week about struggles of black people from 1960s through today. Near end of program it was mentioned about maybe reason why so many blacks are still living in poverty (inner cities) is because racism has been institutionalized. Also for many white people they don't see blacks except on TV where typically they are seen as sports stars, entertainers, or getting dragged off to jail. There is the President but lately his popularity is not that high. Couple months ago Charlie Bolden, NASA Adminis

    • I honestly don't think silicon valley is that racist. They hire tons of chinese and indian people.

      Black people tend to be poor. Poor people tend not to have good schools in their neighborhoods. Having a bad education makes you less qualified to do certain jobs. Rather than trying to get people to hire more black people, we should be trying to fix the massive gap in the quality of schools in rich and poor neighborhoods.

      Rather than trying to implement quotas, we should be trying to eliminate the need for q

  • Now that Jesse Jackson is on the case, we can all rest knowing that, as long as there is any discrimination, he will never give up trying to exploit it for personal gain.

    Are you being accused of being racist? Are you actually racist? It doesn't matter. All you need to do is give Jesse Jackson money, and he will promise not to make your problems worse than they already are.

  • The only thing stopping more diversity is the lack of candidates with the right skill set. My company has made offers to a wide range of people and we don't care what their background is as long as they have the skills needed. One of the best candidates I interviewed was transgendered and we made her an offer but sadly she didn't join. Everyone who interviewed her recommended her. I have never seen discrimination with any of the tech companies I have worked for. I just have never seen any Latino or Black ca

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