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The Internet Communications United Kingdom Technology

UK Completes 250km of Undersea Broadband Rollouts 70

DW100 writes The UK has completed a highly challenging rollout of broadband to remote islands in Scotland, covering 250km of seabed. The work has taken many months but will mean some 150,000 residents in the islands will be able to get broadband of up to 80Mbps. A cable laying ship, the Rene Descartes, carried out the work, with the longest cable stretching 50 miles between islands.
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UK Completes 250km of Undersea Broadband Rollouts

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  • GCHQ (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Brought t you by... GCHQ! It only takes a price mark-up of 100%, but hey, you've got a total backup of your data!

  • Now a very quick way to find out: What's the story at Balamory [tobermory.co.uk]?

    .. Wouldn't you like yo know?

  • by Roodvlees ( 2742853 ) on Thursday December 04, 2014 @11:33AM (#48522773)
    So now even remote scottish islanders have better internet than most of the US.
    When will the US realize they have to regulate their internet market?
    Will it be when Africa passes them in average internet connection?(every other populated continent has)
    Will it be when other nations start to apply diplomatic pressure because they are slowing down the world as a whole?
    Will it be when they end up as the nation in the world with the worst internet connection?
    • How is the US a country w/ the worst internet connection? At least the major cable guys offer unlimited data a month, and price you according to the speed that you wanna rent. Which sounds fair. One has to pay far more than that in other countries - not sure about Europe, but definitely it's far cheaper than Asia
      • by OzPeter ( 195038 ) on Thursday December 04, 2014 @12:30PM (#48523277)

        How is the US a country w/ the worst internet connection?

        NYC has a higher population density that Tokyo, but Tokyo has connection speeds that NY'ers only dream about.

        While you can argue that out in the boondocks high speed internet is harder to do, what is happening in markets like NYC makes the US look like a joke in comparison with other countries with cities of a similar density.

        • Ain't that a given - as there are more consumers, the connections speeds would reduce due to the bandwidth being distributed b/w more people
          • by don.g ( 6394 )

            I'm having trouble working out if you're being sarcastic or genuinely uninformed.

          • by Bengie ( 1121981 )
            A single $100/port fiber chassis has more bandwidth than all of the USA could use right now during peak hours, and that's divided among only 2500 users. Unless you're proposing 2500 home users need more than 4tb/s of bandwidth. For reference, Netflix is about 30% of peak USA traffic and is about 1tb/s.

            Bandwidth density is not an issue unless you're using archaic copper.
        • by xaxa ( 988988 )

          While you can argue that out in the boondocks high speed internet is harder to do, what is happening in markets like NYC makes the US look like a joke in comparison with other countries with cities of a similar density.

          The population density of the Outer Hebrides is 9/km^2, about the same as the Scottish Highlands. The Inner Hebrides have 4-5/km^2. I'm pretty sure that will be the least densely populated place in the whole UK.

          (However, I live in an out-of-the-way bit of London, and get about 2Mbit/s. That's very unusual though, so unusual that I didn't think to check before renting there.)

      • by Trepidity ( 597 )

        At least the major cable guys offer unlimited data a month...

        That's on its way out. Comcast recently started rolling out data caps [comcast.com] in several major markets, and plans to expand them nationwide over the next five years. Time Warner will probably match them soon.

        • In that case, it would be accurate to say that the US will become worse than others. That's assuming that others have the things people in the US take for granted - like a 15Mbps with unlimited data for just $50/month (which is what I have w/ TWC)
      • by dave420 ( 699308 )
        You can just look at the statistics. The US doesn't fare well in pretty much any class. Substandard service, exorbitant prices, poor coverage, and so on.
        • Something more than platitudes would be more appreciated. Like I get cable internet from TWC with a very good service, reasonably priced, and previously in CA, had the same experience w/ Comcast. If you think the prices are exorbitant, who are you comparing it with? Countries like Estonia & Finland, which have a far lower population density, or countries like China, Korea, Japan & India?
      • by Computershack ( 1143409 ) on Thursday December 04, 2014 @12:43PM (#48523427)

        At least the major cable guys offer unlimited data a month, and price you according to the speed that you wanna rent. Which sounds fair. One has to pay far more than that in other countries - not sure about Europe, but definitely it's far cheaper than Asia

        I pay the equivalent of $50 a month for 80mbps down, 20mbps up with no data caps or throttling here in the UK.

        • Me too. Although it's not all roses. Page loads do seem to have gotten quite a bit slower since the ISP filters went in. And I'm fairly sure they've started banning sites before they get court orders. Other traffic seems unaffected though.
    • When will the US realize they have to regulate their internet market?

      If the local government only allows one monopoly ISP in a given town, it's not really a "market," is it?

  • 250 km of seabed, with 50 miles between islands...i suppose consistency of units would be a lot to ask for...

    • 250 km of seabed, with 50 miles between islands...i suppose consistency of units would be a lot to ask for...

      The Brits are confused about units. They can't decide whether to use SI, Imperial, or Ancient Hebrew measurements. Just be thankful they didn't measure the distance in palms or spans.

      • 250 km of seabed, with 50 miles between islands...i suppose consistency of units would be a lot to ask for...

        The Brits are confused about units. They can't decide whether to use SI, Imperial, or Ancient Hebrew measurements. Just be thankful they didn't measure the distance in palms or spans.

        Agree, submitter is inconsistent with units, mixing them in the same sentence is pretty lax. As for confused, I'm not so sure. In everyday life we seem to be able to mix and match units fairly easily, weight is stones and pounds by default, height is in feet and inches, yet somehow I know my metric measures too. None of it really matters as long as we consistantly use metric for science and engineering.

    • by Xest ( 935314 )

      It's probably because it's a French company doing a rollout in British territory. The French sources will quote km, the British will quote miles.

  • I guess this undersea broadband deployment means that a certain sea sponge who lives in a pineapple under the sea can finally get broadband!

    I wonder if this means that the Krusty Krab will start offering free Wi-Fi?

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