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Nest Will Now Work With Your Door Locks, Light Bulbs and More 163

An anonymous reader writes with news about 15 new brand partnerships Nest announced today. "When Google purchased Nest Labs – the maker of Internet-connected thermostats and smoke detectors – the search engine giant saw the potential to create a software platform for controlling the myriad everyday devices and gadgets in consumers' homes, a central hub for the so-called "Internet of things." This vision took a major step towards becoming reality Monday morning, when Nest announced at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas that 15 new partners were joining its "Works with Nest" developer program. Soon, everything from washing machines to light bulbs will be connected with the Nest platform."
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Nest Will Now Work With Your Door Locks, Light Bulbs and More

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  • by gstoddart ( 321705 ) on Monday January 05, 2015 @02:40PM (#48738655) Homepage

    A bunch of people with money they need to part with. The rest of us will continue to not give a crap.

    I neither trust, nor do I want this ecosystem of interconnected crap which puts my house on the internet so that I can access it via my fscking cell phone.

    So, buy into this, suckers. Get your house hacked, or your personal habits sold, or whatever.

    I'm going to continue to assume that most of the vendors jumping on this are a) interested in the analytics data for advertising, and b) grossly incompetent/indifferent to security. I trust neither the intention nor the competence of these companies.

    Get off my damned lawn with your pointless gizmos. I have a key and a programmable thermostat which isn't connected to the interweb.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      >I neither trust, nor do I want this ecosystem of interconnected crap which puts my house on the internet so that I can access it via my fscking cell phone.

      If a hacker wants to pwn my thermostat, that's probably the least of my problems.
      However being able to set the thermostat with my phone is excellent.

      If there are other excellent internet connected gizmos for which control by smartphone is excellent, I'll be buying them. But I don't see the door lock being one of those things due to the more significan

      • by jklovanc ( 1603149 ) on Monday January 05, 2015 @03:02PM (#48738871)

        But I don't see the door lock being one of those things due to the more significant security issue.

        Letting a repair people in remotely could be very convenient. That way you don't have to be at home to let them in.

        • Right and you would trust the repair guy doesn't accede risky break your security cams while legitimatelyoving tools into the correct location? Letting a repair man in when no one is around is the fastest way to get robbed.

          Also anything online is hack able. Thermostat yawn no big deal. The worst that happens is either you spend to much I hear one month or you pipes burst in the cold. However door locks? That would be like the old school garage door opens where 50 codes existed and you could drive down the

        • But I don't see the door lock being one of those things due to the more significant security issue.

          Letting a repair people in remotely could be very convenient. That way you don't have to be at home to let them in.

          I can do that with my current (non internet) code entry door lock. You set up a secondary code. Tell someone. Change it later. Maybe useful, but the thermostat phone control is useful every day.

      • It's your phone and your house, you do as you please with them.

        I see neither a need for any of this stuff, nor do I see why I would trust the companies selling it.

        Me, I expect this is written by incompetent chimps who need to get a product to market and don't give a crap about security, and I see all of this juicy data being collated and sorted and sold. And hacked, and subpoena'd and misused.

        Every 6-12 months for the last 30 years there's always been "the next big thing". And except for a very small numb

        • I'm not sure anyone sees an internet connected thermostat as "the next big thing;" but that doesn't mean it's not a fantastic convenience device and that the learning features are saving people money.

          https://community.nest.com/thr... [nest.com]

          Other than a few people who have incompatible multistage heat pumps, and ignoring the sort of conformation bias by those who opted in early, there's still good savings to be had with a smart thermostat. Connecting it to the internet makes it even more aware. It can save me mor

          • by gstoddart ( 321705 ) on Monday January 05, 2015 @04:28PM (#48739715) Homepage

            Connecting it to the internet makes it even more

            Stupid.

            Sorry, but no. Having my house connected to the internet doesn't sound like it has any upsides to me.

            Having it providing all of that information to Google and who knows who else ... well, that's kind of my point. I don't want a thermostat and technology infrastructure in my house whose privacy policy can be rewritten any time they like.

            I'll give you a privacy policy: no internet connections to crap like thermostats and washing machines; No security problems, and no problems which originate from Google et al being bigger assholes than they admit to.

            I'm not prepared to provide my location information to Google so that it knows I'm not home. Fuck that.

            If I'm on the tinfoil hat end of the spectrum ... WTF would I add connectivity to my house for random appliances and enable more tracking for?

            I'm staunchly against that kind of crap. I have no interest in that kind of crap. I'm actively avoiding that kind of crap. Nest is precisely that kind of crap in my opinion, and therefore not trustworthy.

            Most of us recognize you're as get-off-my-lawn of a regular as Slashdot has

            LOL ... that's the nicest thing anybody has said to me so far this year. ;-)

          • Other than a few people who have incompatible multistage heat pumps, and ignoring the sort of

            Or **any** single stage heat pump. Setbacks with heat pumps cost you money. The most energy efficient means of heating and cooling in many regions is a heat pump... WTF NEST?!??

            conformation bias by those who opted in early, there's still good savings to be had with a smart thermostat.

            Connecting it to the internet makes it even more aware. It can save me more money if it knows I'm not coming home tonight, and not to bother heating up the house until I'm actually on my way.

            I would like to see anyone cite a study establishing measurable savings on the use of NEST vs standard programmable thermostats.

            Just a week ago a bigwig from NEST was interviewed on CNN saying NEST = 20% average savings...

            There has got to be a study supportive of NESTs claims accessible to the public? Or perhaps you think antido

          • by cusco ( 717999 )

            To me, "Works with NEST" means "trivially hackable". I have trouble believing that they've come up with a more secure control system than the security and access control companies, and those can be intercepted. Is Nest going to investigate when your house goes offline like a professional security provider will? No.

            • Presumably your "works with Nest" door lock simply announces who has opened the door, and the Nest responds by toggling the thermostat from "away" to "home", plus or minus a few degrees of comfort depending on the user's RFID/BT who opened the door.

              Nest doesn't talk to the door lock at all, it only listens.

              I trust my cars to keyless receivers. I know they're hackable, but much like the Nest, I prefer the security/usability tradeoff of simply walking to my car and having it unlock and having pushbutton star

          • I'd be more interested if they provided a server program to run on my own hardware and act as Nest's intelligent backend+database, without an internet connection. It's bad enough that my electrical utility installed smart meters without the option to stick with the normal, non-connected ones.

            I see some potential fun to be had with setting up some home automation, and I see value in pre-built hardware that's designed to work together with other hardware, but it ought to be a system where I have as complete
      • by swb ( 14022 )

        However being able to set the thermostat with my phone is excellent.

        I'm curious what the value of this is. How valuable is on-demand remote thermostat changing?

        Programmable thermostats capable of 4 settings per day and 7 per week are common and cheap and all the ones I've owned going back to the late 1990s have the intelligence to adapt to the time required to reach the set point by the scheduled time (and learn as they go, so they adapt to changes in the outdoor weather). Most will also manage variable h

        • >I'm curious what the value of this is. How valuable is on-demand remote thermostat changing?

          The value is in being able to set it from bed, rather than getting up, stumbling downstairs, fiddling with the knobs and stumbling back up the stairs to bed.

          • Or you tell it to activate when you're leaving work early or such. Heck, I could see an application keeping track of you and warming your place up(or cooling it down) when you get within a certain radius of your house.

            I have a programmable thermostat. It's a pain in the butt to program, and I'd love to have a 'I'm home' button rather than having to press the temp+ button numerous times.

            • I can also see how valuable this could be to thieves that would probably pay some hacker for that data.
              • I think you over-estimate the value of it. Finding an empty house isn't hard. I'd be more worried about stalkers and such.

          • Almost all multi-story houses that I'm familiar with have separate thermostats per floor - either with completely separate systems handling each one or with a zoned system where valves control which floors are receiving heating/cooling (ie, downstairs might already be cool, but its hotter upstairs, so the unit is cooling but the vents downstairs are closed off so that downstairs doesn't get colder). If you're letting a thermostat downstairs isn't going to be even remotely accurate for the temperature upsta

            • >Almost all multi-story houses that I'm familiar with have separate thermostats per floor
              Not my 3 story house.

              > a thermostat downstairs isn't going to be even remotely accurate for the temperature upstairs
              Yes. I'm very aware of this.

              When I have plenty of disposable cash, I will pay a person in overalls to make it wonderful, but until that time, I'll make do with my $100 nest and an android phone.

          • by swb ( 14022 )

            How often do you actually change the temperature? About the only time I feel compelled to do it is when the outside temperature drops below about -10F; something about temperatures that low allow the periphery of the house to cool off faster than the core where the the thermostat is, making some rooms a little chilly.

        • I suppose you could tweak the HVAC when you are on your way there so that it is comfy when you get there.

          But other than that it seems kind of pointless. Yet something else to twiddle with just to say you can do it, and then curse the thing when something goes wrong.

        • I've developed using my own Internet connected thermostat using Open Z-Wave [openzwave.com]. Honestly, it has been the most fun I had with computers and programming since the early Internet days during the 90's. I suspect much of the hype is from developers finding a enjoyable use of their skills in creating interesting and useful products.

          The ultimate goal is not to have a thermostat that can be set from a smart phone. A fully connected house with intelligent alogrithms can acomplish some very cool activities. As an e

        • Lazy asses that can't be fucked to get their ass off the couch to set their thermostat.

          Just like the pricks back in the day, "I'm calling you from my carphone"

          "I can set my thermostat without getting up".
      • However being able to set the thermostat with my phone is excellent.

        Seriously, how often does one fuck with their thermostat? The (programmable) one I have for my heat pump is set with low/high points and auto-switches between heat/cool to keep the house in that range. I cannot remember the last time I needed to change the setting, perhaps last year when I changed the whole-house HEPA filter and reset the counter.

        • I don't get it ether. I'm comfortable at no higher than 76 and no lower than 70. I set my thermostat to those min/max temps 2 years ago when I moved in. I haven't had to touch it since.

          I think too many people are just anxious to be fiddling with something. Doesn't matter if it's necessary or useful - they just feel the need to be fiddling with it.

          • I have a cottage. We keep it at 57F when we're away. When we're there, it's 72F during the day and goes down to 68F at night.

            The problem is, it takes a while to bring the house from 57F to 72F when we arrive in the middle of the day... The furnace is good and the air temp is brought up pretty quickly, but there's a lot of heat mass in a house so it takes a while before the floors are toasty, the toilet seat is not ice cold, the couch cushions are warm, etc... So I have a remotely accessible thermostat (RC
      • How about said hacker say turning your heater full blast during the middle of summer or turning your ac on in the middle of winter.
        • How about said hacker say turning your heater full blast during the middle of summer or turning your ac on in the middle of winter.

          It hasn't happened yet. Nor will it. Because there are a billion ways people can cause trouble, but they generally pick the ways that return money, fame or infamy.

      • However being able to set the thermostat with my phone is excellent.

        Really? It may be 'cool' if you feel it is cool to be able to do that kind of things remotely, but how relevant is it in real life that you can control a thermostat or turn on the oven or the lighting from afar? And even if it conveys some benefit, is it valuable enough that you want to pay the price? Which may, incidentally include loss of privacy or perhaps loss of property, if the remote capabilities also allow thieves easier access.

        It seems similar to the way that some cars detect rain on the windscreen

        • However being able to set the thermostat with my phone is excellent.

          Really? It may be 'cool' if you feel it is cool to be able to do that kind of things remotely, but how relevant is it in real life that you can control a thermostat or turn on the oven or the lighting from afar? And even if it conveys some benefit, is it valuable enough that you want to pay the price? Which may, incidentally include loss of privacy or perhaps loss of property, if the remote capabilities also allow thieves easier access.

          It seems similar to the way that some cars detect rain on the windscreen and turn on the wipers - yeah, cool, but the effort it spares you consists of having to reach some 2 inches for a manual switch - is it worth paying for? It's the kind of things you would accept if they are part of a new car you buy, but you wouldn't go to your garage and pay £500 to get it fitted, would you?

          The strawmanniness of your post reaches new levels of straw and man. What does my thermostat have to with my garage? That's right - nothing.

    • by msauve ( 701917 )
      "Nest Will Now Work With Your Door Locks, Light Bulbs and More"

      Reminds me of an old joke:
      Patient: Doctor, will I be able to play piano after the surgery?
      Dr.: Of course.
      Patient: That's great, I never could before!
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by dontbemad ( 2683011 )
      It never ceases to amaze me how "stop liking what I don't like" posts get moderated to +5 Insightful.

      Where is the insight here? Other than the clear insight into the poster's fear of experimental, new technologies and applications.
      • by gstoddart ( 321705 ) on Monday January 05, 2015 @03:16PM (#48739001) Homepage

        Hey, in all honesty, you are free to conclude I'm a crank. That's OK, my wife would agree with you.

        But after 20 years in the tech industry, and 30+ years playing with technology ... this is just another new bit of hype, which stands at least a 50/50 chance of utterly failing, and which provides little compelling need for 99% of us.

        Go ahead, fetishize technology, lament how we don't have flying cars, and walk around all pie eyed and dreamy about the awesome future. I've seen enough to assume it never turns out as rosy as promised, and comes with a new bag of shit most people didn't think of.

        I'm not saying "stop liking what I don't like", because I don't give a rats ass what you like.

        I am saying that, like Microsoft's Smart Home they've been hawking for 15-20 years ... this is overhyped technology which will never see the light of day for most people, and which is purely in the domain of people who have surplus money they wish to part with. It's the epitome of first world problems, and should be treated as such.

        For the most part, I consider most forms of futurists to be deluded people who think The Next Big Thing is going to change all of our lives. And in 20 years will be laughed at in by going through old issues of Popular Mechanics.

        Of course, these days, nobody will have a stack of old blogs, so they won't even remember it.

        Once you've seen a bunch of "Next Big Things" become last years "Dumb Fucking Idea", it becomes a default position. :-P

        • > this is just another new bit of hype, which stands at least a 50/50 chance of utterly failing,

          Nope. It's a thermostat. It works. It's $100 one time and you stick it on your wall.
          It could physically fail in some way, but that's true of many things.

          The 'smart home' is the dream of marketing fantasists that think they can sell many things to each homeowner. In fact they can sell 1, or maybe 2 things, once. Let's not confuse the reality (phone controlled thermostats) with the strawman (smart homes riddled

          • by gstoddart ( 321705 ) on Monday January 05, 2015 @04:14PM (#48739563) Homepage

            Nope. It's a thermostat. It works. It's $100 one time and you stick it on your wall.

            No, you're kind of missing the point.

            See, we already all have those now. Nest doesn't really bring anything new here until you connect it to the internet.

            What I'm saying is the entire Nest platform, with it's interweb connnnectivity, and sending all of your data to Google ... that's the thing I expect/hope to fail.

            Let's not confuse the reality (phone controlled thermostats) with the strawman (smart homes riddled with security flaws).

            I can almost guarantee you that Nest has a security flaw in it. That the mechanism by which you can control your thermostat with a cell phone will have a security flaws in it. And that the companies who make things for this ecosystem will create crap with security flaws in it.

            If you think it is either possible or likely these things don't have security holes in them, you probably haven't been paying attention. Because companies who make internet connected devices are either indifferent or incompetent when it comes to security.

            There is no straw man here.

            This is technology, which is piggy backing on smart phones and the internet, providing marketing and analytics data to the mother ship, and which almost certainly will be demonstrated to be exploitable.

            I think the entire premise of the Nest ecosystem is of dubious value, and of even less reliable security.

            I think having a Nest thermostat means you already have a "smart" home riddled with security flaws. And every connection point to that doubles the ways in which it can be exploited. And, it makes sure Google has access to information from inside your home it never had before.

            I'll pass on the entire technology. Because, as I initially said, I trust neither the intentions, integrity, or ability to implement security of anybody involved in this.

          • It's a webcam you pay $100 connect it to your computer and you can video chat with friends and family.

            Years later average Joe is astounded his webcam was hacked from poor vendor security practices, and or because they didn't understand enough about securing the technology themselves.

            This is the danger.

            Phone controlled thermostat (read web UI), thermostat gets hacked after I leave for work, it's a whopping -20 degrees in Yellow Knife, my kid gets home to find the family dog frozen to death.

            Elderly perso
        • It's the epitome of first world problems, and should be treated as such.

          I think your rabid hatred of it is the real epitome of a first world problem.

      • Where is the insight here? Other than the clear insight into the poster's fear of experimental, new technologies and applications.

        Experimental? Is that written somewhere on the side of the box?

      • Here's the insight (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Okian Warrior ( 537106 ) on Monday January 05, 2015 @04:02PM (#48739449) Homepage Journal

        It never ceases to amaze me how "stop liking what I don't like" posts get moderated to +5 Insightful.

        Where is the insight here? Other than the clear insight into the poster's fear of experimental, new technologies and applications.

        The insight is that this is a subscription model without subscription value. It's an MBA thing, and comes from studying the model without the context in which it is successful.

        Companies see the subscription model as a cash revenue source, and there are several successful examples currently working: NetFlix, iTunes, internet service, phone service, and so on. Get your customers to sign up and sit back and watch the money roll in.

        The problem is when the subscription model doesn't give ongoing service. Fitness monitors comes to mind - you purchase the unit to measure your daily activity level, but you *have* to use their online service to see your results. You can't [easily] download the data to your local computer, and the interface is obscured or encrypted to prevent the user from intercepting it.

        There's no reason for the online subscription, except that it makes money for the company. People eventually realize this and stop using the service and the devices fade into obscurity. See CueCat [wikipedia.org] for an example: This *might* have been useful and *might* have defined a paradigm for website tie-ins in print media, except that the User has to register with zip code, gender, and E-mail address, and the vendor has to purchase a code. Little or no functionality and registration required.

        Companies are drooling over this IOT stuff because they see it as a subscription model and they can sell the user info for even more money, but they don't realize that there is no real value being given in exchange for the subscription. There's really little value in being able to turn your furnace up/down remotely, or unlock your door remotely, or start your dishwasher remotely... and absolutely no reason to do this under a subscription model.

        Joel Spolsky's term for this is "feeble business idea". The attractiveness of the model outweighs the impracticality of the solution.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by timelorde ( 7880 )

      I'm the programmable thermostat at home; my wife is the controller...

    • I like that my house that can take hours to heat up can be turned on towards the end of a long vacation.

      I also like that my programmable thermostat learned how long it takes my house to heat for various outside temperatures, and when to cut off the radiators so it doesn't go past buh any degrees.

      I had had a thermostat in the past that could have some of those things manually entered, but without knowing the outside temperature, and without really learning how much thermal mass was in the radiators, it never

      • Granted, not all of this requires the Internet, but the vacation thing does, and it's a perk I use way more than I though (I travel for work, and randomly visit friends fairly often, I don't waste gas, and I don't come home to a coldhouse )

        My crummy old thermostat has a vacation hold setting you simply enter number of days you will be away and the normal schedule resumes after that time.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Somehow, I feel that the "internet of things" is just setting up a big hackers playpen, if it isn't a 'steal your info' setup for the Big Corporations.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Oh, it can be both.

      I'm just waiting for the day when some internet thugs not just encrypt your data, but hold your whole house for ransom until you pay up.

      • Oh, it can be both.

        I'm just waiting for the day when some internet thugs not just encrypt your data, but hold your whole house for ransom until you pay up.

        A friend who does hardware security has had to deal with an exploited internet-connected refrigerator that had been hacked into a spam relay.
        So: wait until the day when internet thugs encrypt your data, hold your house for ransom, and while doing that, use your devices to attack other people's houses and encrypt their data, plus rent out your house's bandwidth to DDoS farms.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Somehow, I feel that the "internet of things" is just setting up a big hackers playpen, if it isn't a 'steal your info' setup for the Big Corporations.

      Gives an entirely new meaning to "Big Brother knows what's going on in the bedrooms of America." The following morning advertisements for the morning after pill and/or contraceptives arrives in your email or as embedded advertisements on the webpages you or your children are reading later the next day. Scarier still are embedded advertisements on the family computer for lingerie because your teenage daughter was posting semi-dressed selfies via her smartphone before you arrived home from work.

  • by RingDev ( 879105 ) on Monday January 05, 2015 @02:43PM (#48738671) Homepage Journal

    "Nest Will Now Work With Your Door Locks, Light Bulbs and More"

    So anyone who can access your Nest network can now determine your living habits and unlock doors on demand?

    I'm not typically a paranoid libertarian, but really, there are some things I'm 100% fine with handling on a closed network or with my own two hands.

    -Rick

    • Friend, there is nothing wrong with being a little paranoid, it's a survival trait.

      I am heartened to see I'm not the only one who sees the massive problems technology like this can cause. We do not need every damn thing in our homes connected to the Internet.
      • Governments have already proven themselves to be untrustworthy with the current level of tech. Why should we believe they wouldn't pry further into our homes than they do? Could it be because my life is uninteresting to them? The level of them gobbling up citizen data says otherwise.
    • "Nest Will Now Work With Your Door Locks, Light Bulbs and More"

      So anyone who can access your Nest network can now determine your living habits and unlock doors on demand?

      I'm not typically a paranoid libertarian, but really, there are some things I'm 100% fine with handling on a closed network or with my own two hands.

      -Rick

      Lol... I always love this argument.

      So you think someones going to hack your wifi when they could just instead just chuck a rock through a window and climb in?

      There are only 1 way to protect yourself from breakins. Ask any cop. People with medium to large dogs don't get robbed. I get woken up if someone even walks by on the sidewalk. Try and crawl in through my window and you'd have 2 large dogs attached to your legs and shotgun in your face shortly after. The lock on your door is useful only in preventing t

      • by itzly ( 3699663 )

        So you think someones going to hack your wifi when they could just instead just chuck a rock through a window and climb in

        One of these things makes a lot of noise, the other one makes you look like you own the place.

      • by RingDev ( 879105 )

        I agree with you entirely from the point of view of a person attempting to break in to rob the place. This isn't a big deal for that.

        My concern is two fold. Given police tactics for extracting incriminating evidence, even from innocent individuals (Here's a great video on the subject: https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]), and the courts in our country largely siding with the State and Federal governments in 4th amendment disputes, how long would it be before your Nest data is used in a court of law, or in the

    • >So anyone who can access your Nest network can now determine your living habits and unlock doors on demand?

      If someone wants to know my living habits, they can call me. It's easier.

      It reminds me of the DoD guy who used to follow me to conferences to see what I was saying (I do crypto). He approached me (that's how I found he existed) at a conference in the US that followed a conference in China. He said he couldn't follow me to China because he'd lose his US security clearance so wanted to know what I ha

    • I'm not typically a paranoid libertarian, but really, there are some things I'm 100% fine with handling on a closed network or with my own two hands.

      Yeah, the hardware they are talking about is interesting, and if I could set up a local server to control it, that might be useful. But handing over information and control to someplace out on the Internet sounds like about the worst idea ever.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    If not, then what's the point?

  • Get murdered in your own house by -- you guessed it! -- the house itself!

    ..or, at the very least: Your house becomes one big surveillance platform to watch your every move. "Don't be evil", indeed!
    • by Anonymous Coward

      Even better, some random stranger approaches you on the street and reminds you that you need more milk

      a policeman winks

    • Re:Coming Soon! (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Minwee ( 522556 ) <dcr@neverwhen.org> on Monday January 05, 2015 @03:47PM (#48739291) Homepage

      Get murdered in your own house by -- you guessed it! -- the house itself!

      Doors... Locked. Check.

      Lights... Off. Check.

      Nest Protect(tm) Carbon Monoxide detector... Silenced. Check.

      Ventilation fans... Off. Check.

      Gas stove... On. Check.

      Now just wait six hours before undoing all of those, erase a few logs and then wonder how such a tragic accident could have taken place. And you didn't even need to call a SWAT team.

  • Nest Will Now Work With Your Door Locks, Light Bulbs and More
    Ahh, I see we're using the new definition of "now."

    My head is "literally" spinning thinking of the possibilities.
  • by gurps_npc ( 621217 ) on Monday January 05, 2015 @03:03PM (#48738877) Homepage
    Sony has decided to offer free Nest installation and is paying for all of it's employees to have it done.

    What could possibly go wrong?

  • Get ready... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday January 05, 2015 @03:15PM (#48738997)

    "You will be able to unlock your front door after viewing this short ad."

  • ...can it be installed on lazy teenagers?
  • Backdoor.. (Score:5, Funny)

    by jppiiroinen ( 2664019 ) on Monday January 05, 2015 @03:32PM (#48739143)
    ..got just a new meaning.
  • everything from washing machines to light bulbs will be connected with the Nest platform

    So now when we say Google knows our dirty laundry, it won't be a metaphor.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    And for good reason. A coworker of mine bought one of these thermostats and last year around Christmas he was awakened in the middle of the night by his furnace blower running full blast. (Air conditioning mode)
    Nest had pushed out an update and caused his unit to crash. It took a week for them to get things straightened out again and required replacement of the thermostat.
    Over the holidays this year while he was out of town, they pushed out another update. Now his thermostat keeps going to sleep, dr

  • My primary objection (and others' as well, judging by the comments on this story) is having all my network-aware toasters and lightbulbs and whatnot connecting to systems outside of my house.

    Does anyone know of an alternative with the same plug-it-in-and-it-just-works-ness, but with a more sensible scheme that lets me run without an internet connection? Or better still, with a single, secure internet-facing control, and everything else just talking in-house?

    Secondary objection is that iirc (maybe just earl

    • Nest has a dumb mode like that, but no motion sensor override. (You can use the sensor instead of the schedule, with the Auto Away feature, but not in addition to.)

      That doesn't help your other objections, of course. I just wanted to clarify that point. :)

  • I'm sure the black hats will have a great time with this. "You want to get back into your house? Send us 15 bitcoin by midnight. And for another 10 bitcoin by the end of the week, we won't overload your furnace and burn your house down."
  • My "dumb" thermostat has a mechanical limit of 50-90F.
    All the way down and the pipes wont freeze and all the way up and it will just burn tons of fuel.. not my house down.

    What happens when this software internet facing thing crashes? Or gets hacked? If it locks up in the ON or OFF state that could be very costly.

    Internet locks? OK so if the internet is down, I'm locked out?

    Are these IoT hypers saying that its a GOOD idea to tie the basic operation of my house to comcast?

  • "Open the pod bay doors, HAL [postimg.org]"

The possession of a book becomes a substitute for reading it. -- Anthony Burgess

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