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Windows Microsoft Operating Systems Upgrades

Windows 10 Successor Codenamed 'Redstone,' Targeting 2016 Launch 197

MojoKid writes: Windows 10 isn't even out the door yet, so what better time than now to talk about its successor? Believe it or not, there's a fair bit of information on it floating around already, including its codename: "Redstone." Following in the footsteps of 'Blue' and 'Threshold', Redstone is an obvious tie-in to Microsoft's purchase of Minecraft, which it snagged from Mojang last year. Redstone is an integral material in the game, used to create simple items like a map or compass as well as logic gates for building electronic devices, like a calculator or automatic doors. The really important news is that we could see Windows Redstone sometime in 2016.
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Windows 10 Successor Codenamed 'Redstone,' Targeting 2016 Launch

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  • by Crashmarik ( 635988 ) on Tuesday April 07, 2015 @04:24PM (#49425255)

    You really will have blocks of code then

    • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

      Perhaps this is the TRUE reason why Microsoft bought Minecraft... they realized some Minecraft-happy devs on the Windows team has now littered the Windows source code with Minecraft remarks that they'd get sued. So it was cheaper to buy Minecraft than fix the source code.

  • The really important news is that we could see Windows Redstone sometime in 2016.

    What, really, is important about that?

    No-one was expecting Microsoft to stop at Windows 10, were they?

    • by Zocalo ( 252965 )
      No, Mr. Monkey. We were expecting everyone to install Linux and don't really care what MS does.

      Maybe next year...
    • Because you usually don't need an entirely new OS every year, unless you are Ubuntu.

      • Microsoft have an official OS cycle of 1.5 years for interim builds and 3 years for major releases. they have been lax in meeting that goal in the past but this seems to be pretty well sticking to normal release cycle (assuming end of 2016).

    • Spïñäl Täp didn't.

    • by sexconker ( 1179573 ) on Tuesday April 07, 2015 @07:30PM (#49426205)

      Windows Live. The only Windows with DirectX 12.1.
      Only $9.99 per month per device. Includes 60 minutes of Skype credit, a bunch of storage you'll never fill up on a good service you won't use because it isn't called Dropbox, and you have to log into your Microsoft account to do anything. No, your Microsoft account. Your email address you don't use. No, not that one. Look, do you have an Xbox? It used to be called Hotmail but we don't call it that anymore. It's the one you use to view on Outlook. No, not at work, on outlook.com. Yes, even though your address ends in hotmail.com.

      • Pretty much summed up what happened when Mrs Hog bought a laptop with Win 8 on it. Apart from being horrified that it automatically logs you into everything when you start it, so you try creating a local user, but that doesn't do updates or something, so you say sod it, I'll create a new throwaway account. And then you forget the password...

  • Now it is clear why Microsoft spent so much to buy Mojang.

    • I am starting to think Microsoft bought Mojang to stabilize it and keep it OS neutral. A lot of the other entities that could have bought it would already have started using Minecraft to do nasty things to other platforms.

      It would have really sucked for Google to buy Mojang. Save files would have already been mandatorily been sucked to the cloud. Ads on the launcher. And knowing Google an eol would already be announced.

  • What about those rumors saying Windows 10 was made to stay, with continual updates instead of new major versions every now and then, and a possible introduction of a subscription scheme?

  • but it would have been funner.
  • by Billly Gates ( 198444 ) on Tuesday April 07, 2015 @04:47PM (#49425421) Journal

    The fact that the fear of change starting with XP and still to this day many businesses which are smaller still using it with plans to change scare them.

    Annual new releases though will drive them harder to Windows 7 more than any other time in computer history. It means businesses which take years to upgrade due to dozens if not hundreds of apps and ancient IE intranet sites will need staff that just upgrades and changes for the sake of changes year round!

    Cost accountants and CIOs will not like annual upgrades

    • I'm not sure how much of an issue this really is today. Just a couple of years back, for sure. It was a huge issue.

      Heck, right now, many workplaces are switching to web solutions. This has one big advantage in terms of standards and legacy. There is definitely some QA here. many of these were big issues just a few years back. Be it IE6 or older windows applications. I think at my current slow enterprise role, we just got rid of the last non web solution. It still ran though on Windows 7, but its out of ther

      • I was chatting with a network contractor who came from a network solutions company. Just under half about 40% still cling to XP.

        My inbox is flooded with jobs looking for XP to 7 migration experts. Most companies today look at IT as a cost and not an asset as it adds no value to the bottom line

        • Most companies today look at IT as a cost and not an asset as it adds no value to the bottom line

          This is self evident unless they're an IT company.

          Just because something is a cost doesn't mean you can just cut it indefinitely with no impact.

    • Annual new releases though will drive them harder to Windows 7 more than any other time in computer history

      :rolleyes: 7's already out of mainstream support and will EOL in 2020. That's a short-term solution at best.

      • Dude my inbox is flooded with jobs for XP to Windows 7 migrations TODAY! They just started and in their eyes 7 is a brand new OS so why waste more money?

        • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 ) *

          That seems like a really bad way of doing things. XP is fundamentally insecure, there are good reasons to move away from it. Instead of spending time fire-fighting XP infections and unfixed bugs, finding drivers for modern laptops that still work with it etc, moving to 7 years ago would have been the sensible thing to do.

  • by roc97007 ( 608802 ) on Tuesday April 07, 2015 @04:49PM (#49425433) Journal

    ...to talk about the successor now, is that if 10 doesn't pan out, I need to know what I'll be migrating to from Win7 in 2016.

    • by SeaFox ( 739806 )

      ...to talk about the successor now, is that if 10 doesn't pan out, I need to know what I'll be migrating to from Win7 in 2016.

      If they can get it wrong so many times, maybe you should be thinking of migrating to something that's not Windows.

      • ...to talk about the successor now, is that if 10 doesn't pan out, I need to know what I'll be migrating to from Win7 in 2016.

        If they can get it wrong so many times, maybe you should be thinking of migrating to something that's not Windows.

        I'd love to, but I guess I'm what you'd call an edge case. I need apps that are only ported to Windows and Mac. (I migrated from Mac to Windows a few years ago when Apple and Adobe weren't getting along.)

  • Redstone (Score:5, Informative)

    by bruce_the_loon ( 856617 ) on Tuesday April 07, 2015 @05:01PM (#49425493) Homepage

    Well, it could be named after an obscure material in a computer game. An in-joke for those who know it.

    Or it could be named after the Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, or after the Redstone missile built there by von Braun and which was the base for Alan Shepard and Gus Grissom's flights into space.

    Guess we'll never know.

    • Microsoft traditionally code-named its Windows projects after skiing destinations (Longhorn, Whistler, Blackcomb, etc.)

      • by Alomex ( 148003 )

        Yeah, like Chicago.... oh wait!

        Windows 10 was codenamed after a location seen in Halo: Combat Evolved, so it follows that Redstone likely comes from a computer game. I wonder which one...

    • Given they're naming Windows 10 features after things in Halo, it's a fair bet this is Minecraft-related.

    • I knew I could count on someone from Huntsvegas to chime in....

    • Or the sacrificial alter on which the good parts of Windows7 were slain.
  • They will probably call it Release 2.
  • Cortana, Spartan, now this.
  • by westlake ( 615356 ) on Tuesday April 07, 2015 @05:35PM (#49425659)

    Perhaps by 2016 Slashdot will have replaced its stained glass window with a legit Windows icon---
    a courtesy it extends to every other operating system and to projects like GNU Hurd, which hasn't delivered a 1.0 release in twenty-five years.

    • The Gnu Hurd project's icons are trademark free. Microsoft's? Not so much...
    • No thankyou. Windows is still broken.
    • And risk a trademark infringement lawsuit? Why would they do that?
  • you know the start of the manned space race.

  • Oh look (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Ol Olsoc ( 1175323 ) on Tuesday April 07, 2015 @08:20PM (#49426467)
    Another Windows story. That part is okay, but way too many peopple seem to want to drop into the never clever discussion:

    Slashdotter 1: Every other version of Windows sucks.

    Slashdotter 2: No, because your not counting Windows blahblahblah

    Slashdotter 3: Hey, we're not talking about non professional second service packs, were talking about versiions that have thisorthat.

    Y'all are assembling a Beowulf cluster of asininity, and Netcraft confirms it.

    • by mystik ( 38627 )

      *You're* forgetting about Natalie Portman naked and petrified, with hot grits!

      • *You're* forgetting about Natalie Portman naked and petrified, with hot grits!

        And that's just not right, I'll tell you what!

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