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Advertising Idle Technology

Billboard Advertising Banned Products In Russia Hides If It Recognizes Cops 86

m.alessandrini writes: In response to a ban of food imported from the European Union, an Italian grocery in Russia hired an ad agency to create a billboard with a camera and facial recognition software, that's able to change to a different ad when it recognizes the uniform of Russian cops. Gizmodo reports: "With the aid of a camera and facial recognition software, the technology was slightly tweaked to instead recognize the official symbols and logos on the uniforms worn by Russian police. And as they approached the billboard featuring the advertisement for Don Giulio Salumeria’s imported Italian goods, it would automatically change to an ad for a Matryoshka doll shop instead."
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Billboard Advertising Banned Products In Russia Hides If It Recognizes Cops

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  • Good heavens (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 29, 2015 @02:09AM (#49796785)

    "Billboard Advertising Banned Products In Russia Hides If It Recognizes Cops"

    Can anyone translate that indecipherable gibberish into English?

    • Re:Go to school (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      I'm not even a native english speaker, but here you go:

      "A billboard in Russia advertises banned Italian products, but switches to ads for Matryoshka dolls [google.fr] when its camera spots a cop."

    • Indeed. My brain hurts. "Billboard Advertising" is a common term. Perhaps should have went with "Billboard displaying".
    • Re:Good heavens (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 29, 2015 @02:39AM (#49796889)

      The reason this sentence is bad is because it's a so-called garden path sentence.

      You parsed ‘banned’ as the main verb with subject ‘billboard advertising’ but in fact ‘banned’ is a participle acting as an adjective to ‘products’.

      These sentences are called garden path sentences because they lead you along the ‘garden path’ which seems neat and kept and trimmed on both sides until it turns out to be a dead end and you should have taken a left somewhere.

      • by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 29, 2015 @02:56AM (#49796945)

        Parse error: Invalid path, garden not found.

    • Re:Good heavens (Score:5, Informative)

      by Godwin O'Hitler ( 205945 ) on Friday May 29, 2015 @03:44AM (#49797097) Journal

      And once you finally do parse it, it still isn't accurate. The billboard doesn't hide itself; it hides its message.

      "Russian Billboard hides banned products advertisement when it recognizes cops." - one word less, unambiguous, and accurate.

      • Simple, short, clear: "Russian Billboard detects Cops!"

        Headlines are supposed to be simple and short. Other alternatives are:

        Russian Billboard hides advertisement when it recognizes cops.

        or:

        Russian Billboard hides advertisement for banned products, when it recognizes cops.

        Sentences with dependent clauses are often more difficult to read than sentences without dependent clauses. Thus, the first sentence "Russian Billboard detect Cops!" is very straightforward to read. The second variation is slightly mor

        • I wholeheartedly endorse your terseness but you have somewhat chucked the bambino out with the bathwater. There needs to be some context that makes detecting cops significant. Maybe "Dodgy Russian billboard detects cops"?

    • by Livius ( 318358 )

      It's perfectly correct albeit somewhat convoluted English.

      Although it is saying that the billboard hides (intransitively), which is something different from hiding (transitively) the advert.

    • "Billboard Advertising Banned Products In Russia Hides If It Recognizes Cops"

      Can anyone translate that indecipherable gibberish into English?

      An electronic billboard that shows ads for banned products changes what it shows when it sees cops coming.

      • "Billboard Advertising Banned Products In Russia Hides If It Recognizes Cops"

        Can anyone translate that indecipherable gibberish into English?

        An electronic billboard that shows ads for banned products changes what it shows when it sees cops coming.

        Or - Facial recognition allows black market billboard to avoid the police.

    • Can anyone translate that indecipherable gibberish into English?

      Can anyone translate that indecipherable gibberish into English?

    • "Billboard Advertising Banned Products In Russia Hides If It Recognizes Cops"

      Can anyone translate that indecipherable gibberish into English?

      I think the Amish are writing the stories now.....

    • The advertiser believes the cops play with dolls!

    • "Russian Billboard Ad for Grocery Store Selling Banned Products Hides If It Recognizes Cops."
    • Simple!
      In Russia, billboard changes you ... ohh wait!?!

  • Obligatory (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 29, 2015 @02:13AM (#49796807)

    In Soviet Russia, ad recognize you! Wait.. what?

  • Brilliant, until some idiot blabs about it.
    • yep next news headline. "Store owner selling banned Italian goods discovered dead, poisoned with exotic substance"
    • Given that the store doing the advertising presumably stocks the banned goods, and it's a lot harder to hide physical merchandise in a hurry; I'd assume that the plan depends on the costs of being discovered being less than the value of the advertising, with the cute little trick being there to make it newsworthy, not to fool the cops(even if there were somehow zero machine vision errors or plainclothes cops in Russia; it can't be that uncommon for off-duty cops to wear street clothes; or for the families o
  • by bungo ( 50628 ) on Friday May 29, 2015 @02:28AM (#49796853)

    As pointed out on a news website (which I can't remember where for the moment), the whole thing appears staged, and they 'police' are probably acting (or actors).

    It is not illegal in Russia to sell the western goods, it's just illegal to import them, under the current self-imposed Russian sanctions. There is no reason why the shop can't advertise the food, and there is no law that the police can use to stop the food from being sold.

  • specialize in Matryoshka dolls?

  • by Chrisq ( 894406 ) on Friday May 29, 2015 @03:33AM (#49797065)
    CAn I get a Russian police hat with an "adblock" badge on the front.
  • If only there was some way for police to disguise themselves. Or if there was some way to see this advert from a distance. Thank goodness there isn't, or this advert would appear to be nothing more than an advertising stunt.

  • "These aren't the salamis you are looking for.."
  • If they detect a police car parked behind the billboard, they switch to a large picture of a policeman parked behind the billboard.

  • In Soviet Russia, cops hide you!

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