Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×
Windows Microsoft Operating Systems

First Windows 10 RTM Candidate Appears 189

Mark Wilson reports that the first RTM candidate for Windows 10 has been spotted: build 10176. Leaks and sources have suggested the company intends to finalize the operating system later this week, perhaps as early as July 9th. This would give Microsoft almost three weeks to distribute it to retailers and devicemakers before the July 29th launch date. "While the RTM process has been a significant milestone for previous releases of Windows, it’s more of a minor one for Windows 10. Microsoft is moving Windows 10 to a 'Windows as a service' model that means the operating system is regularly updated."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

First Windows 10 RTM Candidate Appears

Comments Filter:
  • by jkrise ( 535370 ) on Monday July 06, 2015 @11:36AM (#50054557) Journal

    Now we wait for the RTFM version so we can start screaming obscenities.

  • by Orange Crush ( 934731 ) on Monday July 06, 2015 @12:20PM (#50054995)

    I reinstall just-infrequently-enough that I don't maintain an image w/ all the updates slipstreamed in, so it invariably takes 20mins for the initial install, and then hours and hours for all the updates to get it current.

    It'd be really nice if MS would be kind enough to provide up-to-date .ISO builds like they've been doing w/ the Win10 insider program

    • It'd be really nice if MS would be kind enough to provide up-to-date .ISO builds like they've been doing w/ the Win10 insider program

      How about if they just made it less of a pain in the asshole to save the update files once downloaded, so you could use them again? Making windows update not delete the installers is literally the least they could do.

      • Or just use the tools provided by MS? WSUS does everything you just stated.

        • Or just use the tools provided by MS? WSUS does everything you just stated.

          A home user shouldn't have to run an enterprise service in order to not have some files they want to save deleted. I considered mentioning that, but I forgot I was on slashdot and thought "surely no chucklehead will suggest using WSUS just to not have some files deleted" and then bam.

      • You don't have to wait for MSFT, just use WSUS Offline [wsusoffline.net]. I've used it for many years, in fact I still have the WSUS Offline .ISOs for Win2K and WinXP and it works like a charm, lets you use DVDs or USB sticks, will even include .NET and Office if you like. Oh and you're welcome ;-)
      • Tip of the iceberg.

        Even if you have all the files on hand there's still a really REALLY long process involving the installation of sometimes hundreds of patches requiring a varied number of reboots along the way generating multiple system restore points, and then filling your Windows installation with several gigs of rollback information, uninstall information and other associated cruft that can only be partially removed by running the Disk Clean-up tool with administrator privileges (which for some reason

    • I reinstall just-infrequently-enough that I don't maintain an image w/ all the updates slipstreamed in, so it invariably takes 20mins for the initial install, and then hours and hours for all the updates to get it current.

      It'd be really nice if MS would be kind enough to provide up-to-date .ISO builds like they've been doing w/ the Win10 insider program

      Or Combo Updates, like Apple does with OS X (and even before).

    • by Dogers ( 446369 )

      Windows 8/8.1 have the option to refresh the OS without losing program or files. Also has the option for throwing everything away save the OS, but that's not what you're after as-is. You can, however, update the image it uses to do this so it lays down one that already contains your apps..

  • by ErichTheRed ( 39327 ) on Monday July 06, 2015 @12:35PM (#50055119)

    I've been doing the Insider Preview thing ever since it was available, and my feeling is that something as important as an operating system should have a fixed-version servicing model. It's great to get new features over time, but could result in headaches for IT. Microsoft has said they will introduce a "long term stable" branch, but my opinion is that mixing features and fixes in the update stream is just going to lead to a mess. If they set the LTS branch root at this RTM point, and never update anything, you can bet that people are going to pressure IT to switch them to the rolling upgrade model. Now, if they keep the LTS branch primed with Service-Packs-that-are-not-Service-Packs, then this is different. The problem is that I can't see them doing this since Service Packs have traditionally reset the extended support clock. I'm assuming Server 2016 is going to be a little more stable than Windows 10, but who knows? This Windows-as-a-Service thing is a big shift.

    I know we're all supposed to be running our workloads in The Cloud, preferably Azure, but I think Microsoft is ignoring a key part of its customer base. There are still a lot of use cases for solid on-premises OS deployments on physical, local machines. They're not mainstream anymore, but they exist, and trying to force people out of that model is just going to drive Linux/BSD adoption. Not every corner of the world has high-speed Internet connectivity available at reasonable prices!

    Also, as people have pointed out, RTM is not the milestone it once was. No one is pressing millions of installation DVDs anymore. But, RTM did mean that all the showstopper bugs were taken care of, and the concept of "ship it, we'll patch it later" just didn't work. All I do know is this -- Microsoft is toast if Grandma can't upgrade her Windows 7 box she bought at Best Buy with zero issues.

    • by Junta ( 36770 )

      There are still a lot of use cases for solid on-premises OS deployments on physical, local machines. They're not mainstream anymore

      I think you can be more strong on this point. The reality is that this *is* the mainstream. 'The Cloud' work is important, but more than important, the people doing it are *louder* than everyone else and the media coverage high since it is novel, but mainstream is remarkably little changed over the last several years.

      RTM did mean that all the showstopper bugs were taken care of, and the concept of "ship it, we'll patch it later" just didn't work. All I do know is this -- Microsoft is toast if Grandma can't upgrade her Windows 7 box she bought at Best Buy with zero issues.

      That is the facet I find concerning, 'RTM is no big deal' statement is bad because it *should* be a big deal.

      Maybe they can juggle LTS and non-LTS effectively, but they have every risk of get

    • The pro does. If you go into PC Settings go select skip releases? On the pro you can still get Updates for the previous version and just be 1 update a year behind. Enterprise licenses go up to 3 years with security updates going into each.

      I will update when the 1st update comes out. THen use this setting and turn this into my LTS. Home editions will always get updates and can't turn that off

  • The preview I installed (~2 weeks ago) was shockingly unstable and slow. I was appalled at the state of an OS, especially when it is slated for release in July.

    (For example, my start... panel... thing... completely hosed itself for no apparent reason, a couple days after I installed the OS, leaving me nothing with a bunch of coloured boxes with class names in them).

    • by Radical Moderate ( 563286 ) on Monday July 06, 2015 @01:43PM (#50055817)
      This. Apple is bad enough at trying to shoe horn new releases into a set schedule, but for MS to pull that off, given their track record, would take a Parting-the-Red-Sea miracle. Hey MS, here's a crazy idea:
      1. Come up with a list of cool features your users and best developers want to see.
      2. Implement them.
      3. Test them.
      4. Bake them into a new OS and release it when it's ready. If it takes 14 months instead of 12, THAT'S OK!!! Really. The number of people jonesing for a new Windows release, even if it's half-baked and buggy, is incredibly close to zero.
      5. Profit!

      BTW, if any of this is too complicated I'm available to consult at very reasonable rates.
    • by Dogers ( 446369 )

      Then get the latest 10162 release and try that instead. It's a "preview" remember? It's *specifically* not finished..

      • by vux984 ( 928602 )

        Then get the latest 10162 release and try that instead. It's a "preview" remember? It's *specifically* not finished..

        3 weeks before its released you'd think they would have the most visible and important parts of the user interface working properly.

        Some localization issues with some control panel... some multimonitor flaw when the taskbar is on the left side instead of the bottom and the two screens are different resolutions...

        But no, builds 10076 and 10130 literally had issues where clicking the start menu wouldn't even reliably open it; and you couldn't even turn bing searching the web off in the start menu / taskbar search. There was no way to just have windows search only the local computer.

        I haven't tried 10162 yet. It wasn't available when I last fooled around with my Windows 10 test machine last weekend. (No way I'm using it as a main computer.)

        3-4 weeks before release, And this stuff wasn't working properly yet.

        It's a "preview" remember? It's *specifically* not finished..

        But it is a preview of where Windows 10 is at right now. And its hard to imagine them getting from here to ready to release in the amount of time they have left.

        • No it isn't, it is a preview of all the possible options that could be included so you can provide good and bad feedback, it is also full of debug code and test code. a preview version is a poor indicator of current state, it is only an indicator of what may be in the final product as all the test and preview stuff that gets dropped makes it appear far less complete than it actually is.
          • by vux984 ( 928602 )

            All true 6 months before release.
            3 weeks before release it should be a lot closer to finalized.

            They should be fixing bugs and writing documentation for what's going to be in the final release by now, not still deciding what features it should have.

    • The preview I installed (~2 weeks ago) was shockingly unstable and slow. I was appalled at the state of an OS, especially when it is slated for release in July.

      You've run Windows before, right?

    • The preview I installed (~2 weeks ago) was shockingly unstable and slow. I was appalled at the state of an OS, especially when it is slated for release in July.

      (For example, my start... panel... thing... completely hosed itself for no apparent reason, a couple days after I installed the OS, leaving me nothing with a bunch of coloured boxes with class names in them).

      You were on preview versions, In addition to bugs they are chocked full of debug code and test features that they were previewing and deciding whether to keep, dump or polish. The difference between what you ran 2 weeks and today is light and day. huge speed, stability and polish increases as all the preview stuff that didn't make the cut has been dumped and all the test and debug stuff removed.

    • I too am worried that once again, marketing has trumped engineering, at Microsoft.

      I tried the preview on my Surface Pro 3 - a Microsoft device (albeit one they warn isn't 100% ready for use with the preview) and it was unusable. I mean, I got a feel for what they were going for - I could understand the OS and see some benefits - but it was far too buggy to function. I don't see how they could go from that to ready to release OS in just 6 weeks (from when I last tried it).

      I feel like someone at Microsoft
  • I have to read the manual before I try installing this one?

  • That's pretty much the most compelling reason to switch to Windows10.
    Otherwise I'm peachy with my customized Win7x64 installs.
  • My surface pro 3 works great with the tablet UI and metro,. I can swipe easy with my fingers and use the charms bar to send my OneNotes to my printer or MS Office.

    Windows 10 is too focuses on the desktop because of the HATERS who do not want anything besides the old school desktop with the mouse and keyboard. There is a tablet mode in WIndows 10 but it is too tuned for a desktop still and not touch friendly.

    WIndows 8.1 is stable and works and I am used to it now. WIth a start menu replacement it is fine on

"You're a creature of the night, Michael. Wait'll Mom hears about this." -- from the movie "The Lost Boys"

Working...