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ISRO Launches Record 5 UK Satellites, Part of a Long String of Successes 33

vasanth writes: India launched its heaviest commercial space mission ever with its polar rocket successfully putting five British satellites into the intended orbit after a flawless takeoff. With the overall mass of five satellites being about 1,440 kg, this launch becomes the "heaviest commercial mission" ever undertaken by ISRO and its commercial arm Antrix Corporation.

The workhorse of India's space program, the PSLV is on a run of 25 consecutive successful launches. First flown in 1993, the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, or PSLV, is by far India's most-used rocket for orbital missions – accounting for thirty of the country's 46 launches to date including Friday's.
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ISRO Launches Record 5 UK Satellites, Part of a Long String of Successes

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  • nukes v nukes. now launch 'em where they want 'em.
  • by jklovanc ( 1603149 ) on Sunday July 12, 2015 @08:00PM (#50095215)

    With the overall mass of five satellites being about 1,440 kg, this launch becomes the "heaviest commercial mission" ever undertaken by ISRO

    Falcon heavy [wikipedia.org] payload to LEO is 53,000 kg. So one Falcon Heavy can send more mass than 36 ISRO rockets. To put it another way, one Falcon Heavy has launched more mass that all launched ISRO rockets.

    • Re:Relative terms (Score:5, Informative)

      by dryeo ( 100693 ) on Sunday July 12, 2015 @08:52PM (#50095459)

      Actually the ISRO has launched infinite more payload then the Falcon Heavy, as the Heavy has not flown.
      Falcon Heavy also benefits from over 50 years of American space development whereas India had to bootstrap the ISRO on its own.

      • OK so the Falcon 9 [wikipedia.org] that has launched. Falcon 9 Leo payload 13,150 kg. ISRO LEO payload 1,440 kg. Ratio 9 to 1. So four Falcon 9's equals ISRO program.

        India has had a ballistic missile program, which had help from the US, since the mid sixties. While not as advanced as the Apollo program they did not start from square one.

        • by dryeo ( 100693 )

          Well, this article is about the PSLV, which puts satellites in Sun Synchronous orbits (polar orbit), something that I don't think the Falcon 9 has ever done. For comparison, there is the GLSV, putting 5000KG in LEO (2500 into GTO), not quite half of the 9. There's also the upgraded GLSV-III which will be able to put 8000KG in LEO once development is finished. It has made suborbital test flights.
          According to Wiki, the Indian civil space program is mostly independent of the missile program, especially early

          • In terms of cost of insertion (USD per kg), ISRO blows all competition away. If, in the future, poor African or Latin American nations wish to put low earth satellites in orbit for remote sensing, weather or similar uses, they won't use Falcon 9.

        • India has had a ballistic missile program, which had help from the US, since the mid sixties. While not as advanced as the Apollo program they did not start from square one.

          This is totally wrong. US was allied with Pakistan (a NATO ally, which was frequently at war with India), and in fact the US actually brought economic sanctions against india in early 70s. US-India relations have been extremely bad until the 21st century. India did purchase a number of rockets (not the tech, just the rockets), from USSR/Russia, but it would require some serious mental gymnastics to call it giving India missile/rocket tech. India also benefit from publicly available information on what works

  • the PSLV is on a run of 25 consecutive successful launches

    Malaysia airlines is also on a run of 25 consecutive successful flights without losing a plane.

    -

    • by Argon ( 6783 )

      That certainly puts things in perspective since a rocket launch is no different from a flight taking off.

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