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Windows Microsoft Operating Systems Privacy Upgrades IT

A Naysayer's Take On Windows 10: Potential Privacy Mess, and Worse 485

Lauren Weinstein writes: I had originally been considering accepting Microsoft's offer of a free upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 10. After all, reports have suggested that it's a much more usable system than Windows 8/8.1 — but of course in keeping with the 'every other MS release of Windows is a dog' history, that's a pretty low bar. However, it appears that MS has significantly botched their deployment of Windows 10. I suppose we shouldn't be surprised, even though hope springs eternal. Since there are so many issues involved, and MS is very aggressively pushing this upgrade, I'm going to run through key points here quickly, and reference other sites' pages that can give you more information right now. But here's my executive summary: You may want to think twice, or three times, or many more times, about whether or not you wish to accept the Windows 10 free upgrade on your existing Windows 7 or 8/8.1 system. Now that we're into the first week of widespread availability for the new version, if you're a Windows user and upgrader, has your experience been good, horrible, or someplace between?
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A Naysayer's Take On Windows 10: Potential Privacy Mess, and Worse

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  • Solitaire is now a separate subscription or you get ads? Lame. Penny wise and pound foolish, MS.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 30, 2015 @02:32PM (#50217097)

    It's also enabled by default if you don't customize your installation settings and in a nutshell, does the following:

    - uploads a supposedly-encrypted form of your wireless AP's password to a Microsoft server for safe-keeping
    - when enabled, shares your wireless password with anyone on your Facebook, Outlook or Skype contact lists who also has it enabled
    - also automatically joins you onto hotspots that your contacts share, regardless of how they are secured.

    I'm beginning to understand how Microsoft can afford to offer the "new and improved" Windows as a free upgrade for a year, I'm guessing the military and surveillance agency contracts have more than paid the bill.

    • by click2005 ( 921437 ) * on Thursday July 30, 2015 @02:42PM (#50217175)

      It'll give loads of people a way to try to get out of copyright infringement lawsuits... "Windows 10" shared my Wifi password"

  • I felt very suspicious about the whole affair to be honest. Microsoft giving me an OS upgrade for free? Yea, that doesn't sound suspicious at all! Turns out I was wright to be suspicious, and will stick with my old version of Windows until they decide to behave. The UI in 10 does look nice, but not at the cost of feeling like my OS will be farming my information. Maybe, hopefully, finally, one day - this will encourage people to invest in and explore ways to improve the Ux of alternative operating systems.
    • by cdrudge ( 68377 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @02:37PM (#50217137) Homepage

      The OS farms your information? That's it, I'm going back to my Chromebook and Android tablet.

      • by Drethon ( 1445051 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @02:45PM (#50217213)

        The OS farms your information? That's it, I'm going back to my Chromebook and Android tablet.

        Google thanks you for your personal data and promises it will not be evil, perhaps just naughty.

        • by Adriax ( 746043 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @03:54PM (#50217987)

          That "naughty" comment has me imagining the different OS makers as hollywood highschool boyfriends now.

          Microsoft: Football jock from a rich family. Has problems playing nice with those outside his little world and expects periodic gifts from you. But he does have a nice car and all the cool toys, plus his family just invited you to the bahamas for vacation.

          Apple: Eccentric artist. Cute, paints, writes poetry, and can act. But has a HUGE ego due to loyal groupies. Expects you to pay for everything on dates.

          Google: Reporter for the school newspaper. Nice guy, gets on well with others. Gives you lots of gifts, though some are not very well thought out. Constantly taking pictures of you, including some you really shouldn't have agreed to.

      • Neither of those OS's, by default, farm you for information. Google does offer you lots of services you really want in exchange for letting them farm you... But there are alternatives and you're free to chose them.

        It sounds like here, Microsoft is doing the farming at the OS level. I don't know if that's true or not, I'll wait to hear more. But if it's true, this version of Windows is DOA. It could have been the one toehold MSFT could have had to fend off Google and they're throwing it all away.

        • Neither of those OS's, by default, farm you for information.

          That's not possible for a Google product. The point of all Google products is to farm information from you. That's why they create the products. The default settings will always be "Upload everything to Googles server for purposes of turning you into a product to be sold".

    • Can someone please provide some sources/proof for this perhaps with some WireShark caputures, etc.? I haven't seen any yet and am considering upgrading but don't want to if this is the case.
    • by jez9999 ( 618189 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @03:23PM (#50217683) Homepage Journal

      The UI in 10 does look nice

      That just goes to show that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. As far as I can tell, EVERYTHING has become a monochrome "white-on-dark" or "black-on-white" mid-90's style WordArt icon, to the point where you can't tell some of them apart. They look butt ugly. Why UX people these days think that removing colour from the icons/glyphs, an important visual clue as to the icon's meaning, is beyond me. I'll keep my colourful Windiows 7, thanks. It doesn't run on a mobile phone, but I don't need or want it to.

    • by Creepy ( 93888 )

      I'm sure it's to push their integrated store on more users - while Windows 8 users already had it, Windows 7 users didn't and Microsoft wants those users to upgrade most. Now they really need to fix the store so it doesn't prioritize pay-crapware over stuff you can get completely free. 7zip is a really good example - all of the top options in the store cost money and there isn't a free option even though the Windows 7 downloadable equivalent is free. I'm sorry, but adding a touch interface to it for $25 is

  • stupid article (Score:2, Informative)

    What a crappy choice for an article. It's a bunch of Google shill crap followed by generalizations and no specifics about actual issues users are specifically facing. I'm fairly certain you can opt out of a lot of the stuff he's complaining about.
    • by Eyeballs ( 64172 )

      Ok, I have actual hard data from my Window Update history. (Note that the upgrade was available on July 28)

      Upgrade to Windows 10 Pro
      Installation date: 7/28/2015 3:16 AM
      Installation status: Failed
      Error details: Code C1900208
      Update type: Important
      Install the next version of Windows.

      Upgrade to Windows 10 Pro
      Installation date: 7/28/2015 7:10 PM
      Installation status: Failed
      Error details: Code 80240020
      Update type: Important

      Upgrade to Windows 10 Pro
      Installation date: 7/28/2015 8:07 PM
      Installation status: Failed
      Error

      • Re:stupid article (Score:5, Informative)

        by kuzb ( 724081 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @03:08PM (#50217493)

        Had this problem on a laptop. There is a relatively simple fix. Basically, something was corrupted in the download for one reason or another. The fix is dead simple.

        1) Delete all the files at C:\Windows\SoftwareDistribution\Download
        2) open cmd.exe as admin
        3) run "wuauclt.exe /updatenow"
        4) Open windows update. You'll see windows 10 downloading.

        It will download the patch again.

      • I used a stock install of 7 on my own laptop which runs basically Firefox and that is it for custom software. I used it for about a month. When I click the Reserve button in Windows update, not one thing happens. Seriously, NOTHING happens. I even gave the i5 and 6GB of RAM and SSD 10 minutes and NOTHING happened. So that's how my "upgrade experience" went so far.
    • What did you read? (Score:5, Informative)

      by s.petry ( 762400 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @03:02PM (#50217415)

      It could not have been TFA because there are only 2 mentions of Google in the whole post. One of those is a disclaimer that the person has consulted for Google but is not doing so presently. The other is: Being careful with your data isn't just a Microsoft thing. My views of Microsoft and Google are pretty much diametrically opposed -- I have enormous faith in Google and Googlers doing the right thing with respect to protecting the data I share with them, but even in the case of Google -- with whom I share a great deal of data -- I'm selective about what I do share.

      I put the parts you didn't read or didn't pay attention to in bold so that even a moron can find them.

      You would have been okay if you had said she favored Google in the article, but to claim it's a shill is completely dishonest.

    • by Luthair ( 847766 )
      Unfortunately there has been a trend lately on Slashdot where the editors accept a lot of stories from people linking to their own site. I guess this is acceptable in the Twitter world but doesn't match a meritocracy where users submit interesting stories instead of pumping up their page views.
  • by techvet ( 918701 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @02:39PM (#50217157)
    There's going to be a lot of noise. I would suggest taking a wait-and-see attitude for some weeks or months before bringing down the hammer. I have seen others say they had no issue.
  • Light on details (Score:5, Insightful)

    by narcc ( 412956 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @02:42PM (#50217179) Journal

    Maybe it was just poorly written, but it doesn't seem like she has any specific complaints.

    Then there was the odd bit about how she trusts Google, so it's okay for them to collect vast amounts of information about her.

    Why is this here?

    • I was really hoping for a list of specific complaints all compiled in one area. I have several, and a nice central place to just link other people to instead of typing them all out every time would be helpful.
    • She is a huge google SHILL, I don't generally like accusing anyone of shilling as it is massively overused, especially on this forum. But FFS look at her blog history and work history, she constantly blogs defending googles evil practises while condemning the same from anyone else. Of course she trusts google, they are a constant source of income for her.
  • So far, other than Windows 7, I haven't see a windows version work so good at release. 8 was just a miserable UI experience, Vista was a resource hog that refused to run anything and XP actually killed a machine that had to be replaced by warranty (OK that may have been a bad machine but XP never was stable for me until SP1).

    I disapprove of the forced updates but I find having all update generally does more good than harm. I've seen updates break computers but I've seen missed updates cause more problems
    • by Jamu ( 852752 )
      My experience was also good for the most part.

      Clean installed Windows 10 Home on a new SSD which worked but I couldn't activate it. Upgraded my Windows 7 installation and activated Windows 10 on that. Went back to my new SSD and reinstalled Windows 10. It then activated. No problems with installing things on it, including the latest nVIDIA drivers (353.60).
    • Go back further. Windows 95 had good reason for OSR2, and Windows 3.0 was pretty much unusable until 3.1.

      Operating systems are major projects - usually the largest and most complicated piece of software on any computer. The first major version is always deeply flawed. The are just too big to get everything right first time.

  • by yodleboy ( 982200 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @02:45PM (#50217215)
    Installed W10 Pro on my PC last night. After all the copying and such, you get a screen that mentions privacy items and offers you the chance to configure them manually. Behold, you can turn off 2 screens of data going to MS and 3rd party applications. I believe the option to turn off wi-fi sharing was there too. So, yes, if you just blindly click through anything that says NEXT, you might have a problem. If you actually read crap, you can avoid most of this mess at install.

    So far, I have no complaints about 10. It looks nice and seems to run as smoothly as the Win7 Ultimate it replaced. Previously installed apps and games all seem to work, although I certainly haven't tried them all yet. The only stand out annoyance was that all my media file associations were reset to use stock MS applications.

    you mileage may vary...
    • by 0123456 ( 636235 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @02:54PM (#50217325)

      So, basically, it only sends all your stuff to Microsoft if you don't turn off that 'feature'?

      • I guess I can't be sure I got everything, but at install i was able to turn off a hell of a lot. I'm sure within a couple of weeks we'll see a pretty comprehensive list somewhere and I'll be able to catch anything I missed.

        Anyway, MS certainly isn't the only one doing this data gathering these days. Opt-in by default is the way it's going to work from now on and you can't put that horse back in the barn. If people aren't reading what they are getting and choosing to opt-out then they have themselves to
  • by DRJlaw ( 946416 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @02:47PM (#50217239)

    [I]n this context I trust Microsoft about as far as I could throw a heavy old steel-cased 1980s PC.

    Being careful with your data isn't just a Microsoft thing. My views of Microsoft and Google are pretty much diametrically opposed -- I have enormous faith in Google and Googlers doing the right thing with respect to protecting the data I share with them, but even in the case of Google -- with whom I share a great deal of data -- I'm selective about what I do share.

    Anti-Microsoft, pro-Google, and no stated reason for faith in one "doing the right thing with respect to protecting the data" while the other, apparently, will not.

    Except for this:

    You may have heard concerns about the sharing of Wi-Fi passwords by Win10. This is largely not a problem in practice, given the details of the implementation.

    How this suffices for posting on Slashdot with the headline tease "Privacy Mess" eludes me. Google = Bing. Google Drive = OneDrive. Chrome = Win 8+ windows-account-synced favorites and settings. Pot and Kettle both the same color, black or otherwise.

    • by Solandri ( 704621 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @03:59PM (#50218035)

      Anti-Microsoft, pro-Google, and no stated reason for faith in one "doing the right thing with respect to protecting the data" while the other, apparently, will not.

      I own my own domain and I give each service I sign up for a unique contact email alias, which forwards to my real email address (currently I have just shy of 500 aliases). I have never received spam at google@mydomain.com. In fact the vast majority of my email aliases receive no spam, indicating the vast majority of online companies are in fact keeping your private info private (at least not without anonymizing it). Contrary to what seems to be the general belief here.

      The two major exceptions have been microsoft@mydomain.com and adobe@mydomain.com. Those two companies clearly sold my email address to marketers and spammers.

      • by ShaunC ( 203807 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @07:36PM (#50219563)

        The two major exceptions have been microsoft@mydomain.com and adobe@mydomain.com. Those two companies clearly sold my email address to marketers and spammers.

        Can you be sure? Every now and then, I'll open up the floodgates and alias all of @domain to an account just to see what comes in. At one point I noticed a ton of spam to netflix@, and got pissed until I remembered that the email on my Netflix account isn't netflix@. That's never been a legit alias, so it's probably a dictionary style attack. Spammers are blasting shit out to netflix@<everywhere> much like the ssh bots try logging in as alice, bob, and a few thousand other users that have never existed on most systems.

  • Now that we're into the first week of widespread availability for the new version [...]

    Didn't Windows 10 came out like yesterday (Wednesday, 7/29/2015)?

    • by SQLGuru ( 980662 )

      Planned FUD post was supposed to be scheduled for next Tuesday but the author doesn't know how to use Buffer App or WordPress. :D

  • by allquixotic ( 1659805 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @02:48PM (#50217249)

    Don't try to upgrade from Windows Update. Just don't. It'll fail. Something is borked with the download process. It'll probably be fixed in a week (or even today, maybe), but for now, to be on the safe side, just go to this link - https://www.microsoft.com/en-u... [microsoft.com] and download the ISO. Then burn it to a DVD or install it onto a USB drive of sufficient capacity, and away you go. Not sure if it would work if you mounted it to a virtual drive, but worth a try.

    I updated 3 systems (a 3 year old desktop, a 2 year old laptop with hybrid graphics, and a virtual machine in VMware on a 4 year old craptop) and did not have any upgrade issues. The only problem I had was on my desktop, where I would occasionally get a MEMORY_MANAGEMENT BSOD when viewing the start menu, until I updated my AMD Catalyst drivers to the latest on the AMD site.

    Some more pitfalls:

      - If you have exotic or rare network cards, graphics cards or printers, you may want to hold off to see if people with your hardware have similar problems.
      - Is your GPU (graphics card, whether it's on the CPU, on the motherboard, or an expansion card) *more than* 4 years old? If so, you may have some problems, especially if it's by Intel.
      - Do you have any programs installed which install custom software into the OS kernel ("kernel modules" / "drivers")? Things like: virtualization software (VMware, Virtual Box), VPN software (OpenVPN, SSL VPN clients, etc.), certain audio / video production software, etc? If you see anything in Device Manager that isn't actually a piece of hardware and sounds like it's associated with a program you have, chances are good that the answer is "yes". You should really consider uninstalling these programs before you upgrade to reduce the potential for incompatibility in the kernel. Then you can try to install them after the upgrade is complete, where the driver will hopefully fail to load "gracefully" and error out of the installer if it turns out to be incompatible.
      - Is your system *extremely* "hacked up", with extensive deep-running customizations to the UI, .NET framework, kernel, or other things like that? You should probably not attempt an upgrade, especially if the vendor/developer of these changes is not a well-known commercial entity with an established footprint.

    Summary: If you have a computer that was purchased new with current-gen hardware within the past 4 years, and you don't have anything more than web browsers, office programs, and games installed, you should have no problems upgrading. If you have a much older computer, your risk of breakage is higher. If you have deep customizations to the OS, your risk of breakage is higher. If you're in doubt, hold off until others with similar configurations try it first and report their results. But for the love of God, use the ISO, not Windows Update, to upgrade.

    • by phantomfive ( 622387 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @03:09PM (#50217505) Journal
      More information in a single post than in the entire article. I guess that's why I read Slashdot, and not the articles.
    • I didn't even do that much. The link will give you a download of the Media Creation app. When you launch it, you have the choice of
      1. Upgrading the current PC now, or
      2. Download the ISO to burn and install on another PC.
      I selected option 1, let it download everything, then clicked yes when it asked to continue upgrade. It took a bit longer than I expected, but I didn't run into anything fatal. The only weird thing I ran into was when it installed the Razer Synapse app and drivers for my mouse. At th
    • by T.E.D. ( 34228 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @04:03PM (#50218063)

      Don't try to upgrade from Windows Update. Just don't. It'll fail. Something is borked with the download process. It'll probably be fixed in a week (or even today, maybe), but for now, to be on the safe side,

      ...don't bother, unless your time is worthless to you.

      just go to this link - https://www.microsoft.com/en-u [microsoft.com]... [microsoft.com] and download the ISO. Then burn it to a DVD or install it onto a USB drive of sufficient capacity, and away you go. Not sure if it would work if you mounted it to a virtual drive, but worth a try.

      If you do that, the first thing it does is ask for an activation key. Your windows activation key from your original Windows media is likely to not be accepted. My 8.0 key wasn't.

      Although, there is one really interesting thing you can do. Instead of creating an install ISO, take the option to just upgrade straight. Do this from a non-admin account (you know, the way you are supposed to run things for system safety). This will produce what is being argued to be the most amusing error dialog [wired.co.uk] in human history, which reads in big letters "Something Happened", and then under that in smaller letters the clarification: "Something Happened". Years from now, you can tell your grandchildren you personally got this dialog.

      But if you aren't aching to participate in the meme, save yourself some aggravation and wait until MS gets their act together.

  • by CaptainDork ( 3678879 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @02:52PM (#50217311)

    ... what experiments were performed and what data points gathered, and where are the conclusions based on the study?

    I am not implementing Windows 10 because it is a security bitch and I'm not interested in fucking with the drivers that run my peripherals.

    I will wait until the early adopters send in their reports.

    There.

    I just wrote the same goddam article.

    yw

    • I am not implementing Windows 10 because it is a security bitch

      What's wrong with Windows 10 and security?

  • windows 10 released with a zero-day glitch so severe it showed up on imgurs frontpage and reddit. It has the ability to connect Xbox with Windows, which would make sense in a world where all the titles weren't already ported and working just fine in windows xp/7/8. The start menu still includes a vainglorious middle finger to the customers who refused to accept the Microsoft start "page." A mini version is included for your consideration alongside a useful start bar. Internet Explo--er i mean Microsoft
  • Windows "free" edition will write home about pretty much everything you do. The default settings send Microsoft ya unique device ID with everything you type, everything you say, every link you click, and every file name. The settings you can't change send less to Microsoft but still way too much. I'm not comfortable with this level of reporting. More importantly I'm not comfortable with Microsoft having the option (updates you can't disable) to ratchet that up. I'm not a frog for Microsoft's pot.

    That alone
  • by jklovanc ( 1603149 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @02:56PM (#50217345)

    From this article [thenextweb.com];

    You can deactivate that by hopping into settings, but I’d argue that it should be opt-in rather than on by default. Many users won’t get round to turning it off, even though they would probably want to.

    I would argue that most of the people who have an issue with the default sync option are the ones that would know how to turn it off and would do it. Conversely, most of the people that would benefit from the sync, that being most of the users of Windows 10, would not know it exists and/or how to turn it on.

    Microsoft had to choose whether to cater to the average user or the security conscious user that does not trust Microsoft. Microsoft chose the former.

  • I successfully and easily installed 10 on two machines (HP Envy laptop and a home built core2duo box) with only the slightest of hiccups. Th home home built box had a brief vid driver issue but it resolved itself within minutes.

    Using TFA method, I declare Windows 10 a massive success and a beacon of hope for all computer-kind.

  • It still handles wi-fi better than OS X discoveryd.
  • I only used it for a few hours last night but here's what I got so far: I disabled a bunch of the data collection things during the installation (I think I left usage stats or something like that...I like to give something back). The color schemes aren't that great. The start menu/search has been easy enough to adjust to. the UAC stuff messed up a few of my programs that didn't have permission to write to their own directories in Program Files. I don't use media center so I don't care about that. I heard t
  • I tried to use Windows 10's Media Creator to create a .iso I could burn to upgrade multiple computers. It threw the trending "Something happened" [hindustantimes.com] error message. Great start.

    I later figured out that this error is thrown if you try to save the .iso to a directory junction. It's probably not the only cause, since directory junctions that aren't preinstalled are rare, but it is one of them.

  • Does it run Minesweeper OK?
    • Needs to be downloaded from the windows store as a Metro App. It's annoying as shit. The new minesweeper is more annoying than the metro menu.

  • Early(ish) adopter (Score:5, Interesting)

    by The-Ixian ( 168184 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @03:08PM (#50217495)

    I have been running Windows 10 on my desktop for the last couple of months and it has been an interesting experience.

    I am a WoW player and will sometimes jump into Dragon Age. I also played the SWBF Alpha which ran just fine. My system is an 8 core AMD CPU with a Radeon HD 7900 on an Asus ROG motherboard. There have been definite issues with system stability related to graphics drivers even though the performance has not been noticeably slower.

    I was running Windows 7 before and attempted to do an in-place upgrade initially but it failed despite trying many different things. I ended up installing clean from an ISO and have been on the fast ring ever since.

    I have enjoyed seeing the evolution of the desktop and the changes to the UI over the last couple of months and I am really happy with the smooth transition from insider to "RTM" bits.

    I like Edge even though I will stick with Firefox until there are some key extensions available for it.

    I kind of liked the "modern" version of Skype that they then took away.

    I am not really sure that I like Cortana integration.... I just am not really sure how to utilize it fully.

    I do REALLY like the MSA authentication and Azure cloud services integration though... It is really neat to have seamless integration between my Nokia windows phone and my desktop without having to install any 3rd party stuff.

    I used to be like most /.ers and hate MS and Windows, but over the years I have changed my tune. I spent many years running a Gentoo desktop and working through all kinds of problems, but I have sort of come full circle now. My first OS was DOS 6 + Win 3.1... I bought Windows 95 on 20+ floppies then 98 then moved on to Slackware 3 and stayed in the Linux world for several years before returning to Windows 7 on my desktop.

    This is the first time I have ever been a beta user of Windows and I have to say it was a fun experience.

  • I am very pleased with Windows 10. I am mainly a OS X user, since the first Mac 128. However, I have had to use Windows on occasion professionally and I play several games that require it. I do not claim that I am a good example for others, I run fairly new equipment, with lots of ram (for me, 16GB) and lots of disks (10TB total). I run multi boot, OS X 10.11, OS X 10.10, Debian, SuSE and Ubuntu, Windows 7, Windows 8.1 (couldn't stand 8) and Windows 10. I always apply all upgrades/updates I can find - I lov

  • by srobert ( 4099 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @03:21PM (#50217667)

    I read through some of the privacy documentation. Buried in the mass is basically, MS reserves the right to share your information with whomever they deem necessary. But they want to assure you they won't be abusing that right. And they want you to feel rest assured that opting to give up your privacy will give you a more pleasant experience using your computer.

  • by dell623 ( 2021586 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @03:22PM (#50217673)

    The level of data collection and sharing enabled by default in Windows 10 is truly scary, as I mentioned in a comment yesterday (http://slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=7759605&cid=50205063). But that blog post is snarky and awful. There is a decent article about it, which belongs in the summary, ironically one she linked herself: http://thenextweb.com/microsof... [thenextweb.com]

    There may be a valid point or two in that blog, but the Google drool all over it makes it truly terrible.

    "I have enormous faith in Google and Googlers doing the right thing with respect to protecting the data I share with them"

    Umm yeah...

    "Users with Home versions of Win10 will be required to accept automatic updates, including drivers.


    And here's a biggy. If you don't want Microsoft installing updates automatically -- if you're a user who has chosen to take control of this process up to now -- you probably will hate Win10.
    In some environments, this is unacceptable from a support and security standpoint, and reports are already coming in regarding driver related issues."

    The cesspool that is the average Windows Home machine can only be improved by automatic updates. Just heard from someone a couple of days ago that they disabled Windows Update completely because it made their computer slow.

    Many users -- especially on somewhat under-powered systems -- may find Win10 to be a painfully slow experience compared with Win7, irrespective of MS' claims.

    Weasel worded nonsense - most factual reports suggest the opposite.

    First things first. It's obvious from my email today that this icon and MS pitch alone are confusing many users. They've never seen anything like this appear before and many think it's a virus or that their system has been otherwise compromised.

    Ah I wish the average user was that suspicious about actual threats. That corner on the average Windows machine is taken up by about twenty background apps.

    The privacy issues in Windows 10 are quite fucking terrifying, and matter far more than one more icon hidden in a corner.

    The issue for me is that I use Windows because I have to, Android / iPhone / GMail / Siri / Google Now etc. are a choice. And if I am not wrong, these are all opt in, you get notices when you first start up your phone / iDevice. Also a quick read suggest Microsoft's data collection goes far beyond anything I have seen even from Google.

    "Windows 10 generates a unique advertising ID for each user on each device. "

    "We will access, disclose and preserve personal data, including your content (such as the content of your emails, other private communications or files in private folders), when we have a good faith belief that doing so is necessary to protect our customers or enforce the terms governing the use of the services."

    tl;dr Windows 10 privacy issues are scary, but that blog post is garbage, try here: http://thenextweb.com/microsof... [thenextweb.com]

  • by Anonymous Coward

    One Ring 0 to rule them all. One ring to wiretap them.
    One Ring 0 to spy on them all and in adware f... them.

    Unique ad ID for every user, forced updates, harvesting and sharing our data. Come on guys, you must know where this is going. IMHO it is all targeted at future advertising and monetising us. They might have finally realised that there are tools like adblock that won't go away easily and the only sure way to present us with crap is to firstly deprive us of ways of fighting back (eg. uninstalling unwan

  • by WOOFYGOOFY ( 1334993 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @03:47PM (#50217925)

    I RTFA and read the links. They're shocking and I don't use that word casually. I am posting the direct links here with the excerpts from the license agreement.

    No human being who had these explained to them in an ordinary setting by someone they knew and trusted would knowingly agree to them.

    Here goes:
    From:

    Sign into Windows with your Microsoft account and the operating system immediately syncs settings and data to the companyâ(TM)s servers. That includes your browser history, favorites and the websites you currently have open as well as saved app, website and mobile hotspot passwords and Wi-Fi network names and passwords.

            To enable Cortana to provide personalized experiences and relevant suggestions, Microsoft collects and uses various types of data, such as your device location, data from your calendar, the apps you use, data from your emails and text messages, who you call, your contacts and how often you interact with them on your device. ...

    Microsoft can disclose your data when it feels like it

    This is the part you should be most concerned about: Microsoftâ(TM)s new privacy policy assigns is very loose when it comes to when it will or wonâ(TM)t access and disclose your personal data:

            We will access, disclose and preserve personal data, including your content (such as the content of your emails, other private communications or files in private folders), when we have a good faith belief that doing so is necessary to protect our customers or enforce the terms governing the use of the services. ....

            Cortana also learns about you by collecting data about how you use your device and other Microsoft services, such as your music, alarm settings, whether the lock screen is on, what you view and purchase, your browse and Bing search history, and more.â

    The author goes on to note:

    Lots of things can live in those two words âoeand more.â Also note that because Cortana analyzes speech data, Microsoft collects âoeyour voice input, as well as your name and nickname, your recent calendar events and the names of people in your appointments, and information about your contacts including names and nicknames.â ....

    The updated terms also state that Microsoft will collect information âoefrom you and your devices, including for example âapp use data for apps that run on Windowsâ(TM) and âdata about the networks you connect to.'â ...

    Windows 10 generates a unique advertising ID for each user on each device. That can be used by developers and ad networks to profile you. ...

    They intend to completely remove the notion of privacy from the tools we use to create share and store the most private thoughts we have.

    This is Linux's Big Chance. People will reject this massive barefisted amoral invasion of privacy and flee- if they can get a decent computing experience out of some UNIX clone.

    Not to turon this into a "What['s wrong with Linux" discussion but I have sincerely tried to move to Linux repeatedly and just found the experience awful. I am nto interested in learning a CLI to get normal stuff done-at all. The performance compared to Windows has always been terrible, my software is slow, the drivers are missing etc etc.

    Perosnally I feel like Ubuntu is somehow in the thrall of a culutre of devs who are not interested in accomodating the masses and take it as a point of pride that finding getting installing and using applications still requires exiting to a CLI, which knowledge they love. Yes, many of them do want to share the love with you, but many people wanted me to share their love the Grateful Dead's music with me too and the thing is, I just don't like it.

  • by KlomDark ( 6370 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @04:06PM (#50218097) Homepage Journal

    your constitutional right to a trial. They make you agree to binding arbitration instead. (Section 10 of the EULA).

    That one really burns me. It's pretty unAmerican to say "Give up a constitutional right or you can't use our product." (Was that there before?)

    How can this be legal? There's got to be a way around that. I have no intentions of ever suing Microsoft, but this rubs me the wrong way. What's next, you have to give up your right to freedom of speech?

  • by Ol Olsoc ( 1175323 ) on Thursday July 30, 2015 @09:33PM (#50220055)
    I've upgraded to windows ten on a sacrificial computer.........

    and......

    so far......

    I'm not hating it. Holy shit - I'm not hating it! I have been able to find my way around, the whack-a-mole Windows 8 system controls are gone, and I haven't had to go to the internet once to find out how to do something, also a W8 SOP.

    But I set up and used some programs I expected might have trouble, and did a remote cotrol session across the country training a person, and it all worked. I'll note that there are a few things yet I'm really concerned about, like the update process, and Wi-fi sense.

    And lest anyone call me a shill, I'm an old school Microsoft basher.

    But I could actually use this damn thing. sheesh, I need a beer now, I'm all shook up....

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