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Wireless Networking Technology

Seeing 2.4 GHz Radio Waves 43

szczys writes: There was this art piece that circled the internet a few weeks ago which used a tablet to visualize WiFi and other signals and it was complete fake. It was cool, and it approximated where radio waves emanated from, but it wasn't actually measuring them for display. Greg Charvat has built his career on Radar and other RF design. Seeing that demo he realized he could show you what actual microwaves look like. He used a radar that he built himself from coffee cans. By altering the circuit just a bit he is able to move the receiver around the room and illuminate different LEDs based on the signal traits. A long exposure photograph captures this and lets you see the radio waves. It's like a charcoal rubbing but for electromagnetic waves.
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Seeing 2.4 GHz Radio Waves

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  • by pr0t0 ( 216378 ) on Wednesday September 09, 2015 @08:31PM (#50491345)

    I didn't know Norman from Bates Motel was into radar and em waves. Cool.

  • they look like WiFi
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 09, 2015 @08:49PM (#50491425)

    What does this have to do with the new iPad Pro? This site is supposed to be news for nerds...not this boring gobbledygook!!

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 09, 2015 @09:22PM (#50491583)

    7 months ago on Hackaday's own site:

    http://hackaday.com/2015/02/17/mapping-wifi-signals-in-3-dimensions/

  • by Wycliffe ( 116160 ) on Wednesday September 09, 2015 @09:31PM (#50491617) Homepage

    Microwave and light wave are on the same spectrum so if you could see in microwave then it would just illuminate objects just like
    regular light or ultraviolet light but with the awesome effect that it would actually penetrate some objects. A camera that shifted
    microwave down to visible light would be really cool similar to how a ultraviolet camera lets you see ultraviolet light.

    • by Tony Isaac ( 1301187 ) on Thursday September 10, 2015 @12:57AM (#50492405) Homepage

      A big difference from regular light would be blurriness. WiFi, at 2.5 GHz, has a wavelength of about 5 inches. This would lead to an extremely foggy, blurry image of everything around you.

      • A big difference from regular light would be blurriness. WiFi, at 2.5 GHz, has a wavelength of about 5 inches. This would lead to an extremely foggy, blurry image of everything around you.

        This is actually terribly insightful. I just googled "c / 2.4 Ghz" and Google came back with "12.4913524 centimeters".

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Fun fact, humans can actually see UV light pretty well if you remove our lens that obscures it.

      Many people who have had one of their lenses removed have noticed it, and many have reproduced what it approximately looks like and how it affects the world they see around them.
      Their sensitivity to bluer frequencies is still the same though, no increase in fidelity, just opens up more of the spectrum to see.
      For the most part, it increased how vibrant everything looked, a whitish blue-violet filter being applied t

    • Microwave and light wave are on the same spectrum so if you could see in microwave then it would just illuminate objects just like regular light or ultraviolet light but with the awesome effect that it would actually penetrate some objects. A camera that shifted microwave down to visible light would be really cool similar to how a ultraviolet camera lets you see ultraviolet light.

      Maybe a "pinhole" microwave camera is possible?

  • The video looks like is was made by rubbing charcoal on the monitor. Is this guy serious?
  • that didn't look like waves to me ... particles?

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