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Facebook Security

Facebook Dislike Hype Exploited In Phishing Campaign 54

An anonymous reader writes: A new Facebook scam is quickly spreading across the social network which plays on the announcement of the highly-anticipated 'Dislike' button. A new scamming campaign is now exploiting impatient Facebook users anxiously awaiting the dislike button addition, by tricking them into believing that they can click on a link to gain early access to the feature. Once the unsuspecting victim selects a link, they are led to a malicious website, which enables access to their private Facebook accounts and allows the hackers to share further scam links on their behalf.
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Facebook Dislike Hype Exploited In Phishing Campaign

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  • Moderation system (Score:5, Interesting)

    by MrKaos ( 858439 ) on Tuesday September 22, 2015 @07:26AM (#50573219) Journal

    Do any other sites have the same sort of moderation system that /. has?

    Moderated 'dislike' or 'like' seems kind of lame in comparison.

  • Seriously? These idiots are boasting that they scam... Facebook users, which are mostly non-tech people, like soccer moms, pre-teens, and the elderly?
  • I dislike this story. Where's the big red button that tricks me into pressing it? I'll press it willingly.

  • As the comment says. Fake dislike scams have existed for ages. Those people are dumb. I actually even doubt this is newsworthy.
    • I remember at some point in the last two years or so someone put up a poll whose question was "Do you want me not to de-friend you?" or something to that effect. And then I started seeing it pop up everywhere on my feed. So, I looked into it. An angry post from me followed to the effect of: "okay, people, cool it. You know that this is a poll, and it really isn't directed at you, and was probably started by someone you didn't know? Okay, so stop responding to it!"

      Another was more recent: over a recent

      • by torqer ( 538711 )

        Wow. The trusted source of truth for a township is a Facebook page. I don't mean it as a slight to the commenter, it's probably very accurate, it just is amazing to me what the world has become.

        I feel old.

    • Stupid [deviantart.com] internet explorers are not in the minority.
    • As the comment says. Fake dislike scams have existed for ages. Those people are dumb. I actually even doubt this is newsworthy.

      Well, you've seen the "news", right? This is newsworthy because it's happening to some people on facebook. It's probably worth a reminder that people are idiots. What kind of person thinks they need to download a website feature from a third party? I get why someone would think they would need to download an installer for an add-on that gave some site functionality, that's not outside the realm of possibility even to an educated user. But to think that they should get it from randomsiteinthecloud.com instea

      • by ruir ( 2709173 )
        People can be very daft. I remember a friend complaining about their computers being SLOW. Somewhat they sent me a link to a font to install with funny symbols...I installed in a VM and IMMEDIATELY the computer almost went to a halt. How hard would be to figure out it was that file had a malware payload I wonder...
  • Once again, Facebook users provide a never-ending source of gullible suckers who will click on ANYTHING given the slightest encouragement.

    Reason #32,461,273 why Facebook is a bad idea for the unwary, the unwise, and people with a propensity to click on everything they see.

    Maybe someday I'll get a Facebook account so I can be exploited by advertisers and malware authors. I almost feel like I'm cheating them by not having an account.

  • My Facebook dislike has not been exploited
  • Never mind the usual Facebook hate and how Facebook users are stupid. We may not use it but we all know people who do. So the real question is:

    Once the unsuspecting victim selects a link, they are led to a malicious website, which enables access to their private Facebook accounts and allows the hackers to share further scam links on their behalf.

    How the hell does clicking on a fucking link enable access to a private Facebook account?

  • What's the point even... FB is a cesspool of stupidity. We've got people borrowing phones and writing statuses saying they've "hacked" their friend's account. We've got people that think sharing and liking will save a life or make them rich. We've got people that will click any and every link they see.

    How is this news at all? It's just the same old story of stupid people falling for incredibly obvious (and stupid) tricks.
  • I suggest that faceplant institutes a third button for commenting on posts and call it MEH. A more considerate naming choice than a WGAS button. (who gives a shit) which is what most posts on faceplant usually deserve. After all, who really cares if your grandmothers cat hoiked up a giant hair ball that looked like a cooked Johnsonville Brat sausage this morning, replete with pictures!
  • by NetNed ( 955141 ) on Tuesday September 22, 2015 @12:06PM (#50575565)
    "The button is big, red, and blinking "push me!!". Seems totally legit to me" says that guy in my office.

"Well, if you can't believe what you read in a comic book, what *can* you believe?!" -- Bullwinkle J. Moose

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