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Wine Emulation (Games) Graphics Open Source Software Upgrades Windows Linux

Wine 1.8 Released (winehq.org) 119

An anonymous reader writes: Wine 1.8.0 is now the latest stable release of Wine Is Not An Emulator and available from WineHQ.org. Wine 1.8 features include support for DirectWrite, Direct2D support, very limited Direct3D 11 support, simple application support of DIrect3D 10, support for process jobs, 64-bit architecture support on OS X, networking updates, and over 13,000 other individual changes.
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Wine 1.8 Released

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  • Yeah (Score:4, Funny)

    by colinrichardday ( 768814 ) <colin.day.6@hotmail.com> on Saturday December 19, 2015 @01:22PM (#51150677)

    Time to download!

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      With native Linux apps, because none of the Windows browsers work well in Wine. And no, I'm not kidding: From the apps database:

      14000 apps
      4000 rated as "garbage"
      2600 rated as "bronze", which is usually a very generous rating
      3000 rated as "silver", which translates to "keeps multiple copies of your data without corrupting old copies

      • ies4linux worked fine for me. Can't really blame them that they keep apps that do not work completely.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Interestingly running Firefox on Wine works quite good for simple browsing and is even faster then the native Linux versions. Something about the Distros not using profile guided optimizations in their builds.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I use it every day for some application that is unfortunately not ported to Linux yet.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    When you got Winae? Out the window goes windows.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Only another 16 years till we get the golden wine 3.1 release. What will become of MS on the desktop / slab / server in 16 years.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    How does a phoronix link sneak into an article about wine? The anonymous poster is probably Michael Larabel himself, trying to grub more money.

  • by unixisc ( 2429386 ) on Saturday December 19, 2015 @03:56PM (#51151227)

    Seems to me that the best approach, given both modern multi-core processors, would be doing something like ReactOS, and making VMs, jails and zones out of it running on Linux, BSD and UNIX.

    Have 2 editions - one an XP based win32 edition, and a 7 based win64 edition

    • A Windows VM anywhere inside your network can be a profound security hole for a number of system architectural reasons. It can also create an undesired and unexpected maintenance cost to keep them active and secured. There are old programs, especially finance software, which may be business critical that run under Wine but not on modern Windows systems. Those programs are also particularly vulnerable to Windows support issues when the original programmers are out of business, or got bought by a company that

      • Why would a VM be a security hole? Particularly if it's a jail, or a zone? It operates in its own space, separate from others, so if something else infects it, it can be closed from the parent OS.
        • > Why would a VM be a security hole? Particularly if it's a jail, or a zone? It operates in its own space, separate from others, so if something else infects it, it can be closed from the parent OS.

          The main reason is because very few environments bother to create, or to maintain such a restrictive environment. Such a system is, ideally, completely isolated from the rest of the network. Unfortunately, that also means it can no longer use network printers, it can no longer provide or collect information wi

    • by Microlith ( 54737 ) on Saturday December 19, 2015 @05:16PM (#51151477)

      Perhaps because you don't care to pay for a Windows license, or agree to Microsoft's EULA?

      • by cfalcon ( 779563 )

        > Perhaps because you don't care to pay for a Windows license, or agree to Microsoft's EULA?

        That Windows EULA is some serious 1984 shit too lol

      • That's why I suggested something like ReactOS. Complete the project for purposes of being at least a useful VM, if not an OS, and then run it under one of your Unixes. And like the above poster said, some of them may be seriously dated stuff. However, XP covers all win32 applications, so an XP compatible ReactOS would work well here, while a 7 compatible ReactOS would work well for win64 applications
    • by dbIII ( 701233 ) on Saturday December 19, 2015 @11:09PM (#51152403)

      Having it run in the actual host OS via using libraries has a large number of advantages - from the utterly obvious of being able to cut and paste between applications onwards. Do you really want to muck about transferring the files you want to work on to a VM? I've done that and it gets old fast even for hobby stuff.
      Having to run an entire extra desktop with all the overhead to run a single application may be the way that people are used to doing it with RDP and MS Windows, but it's a pain in the neck in comparison to just clicking on a menu item or icon to start the thing as if it was in it's native OS.

      • by mrsurb ( 1484303 )
        This. Wine has enabled me to run Linux (first Ubuntu, now Mint) on my work laptop for the last eight years, since the one piece of professional software that I use (only available for Windows or OSX) runs under Wine and I can copy paste into Libreoffice seamlessly.
      • You can easily access the host file system with Virtualbox. It basically sets up a Samba share on the linux host and adds the shared folder to your network which you access via Windows Explorer in the Windows VM. I've been using this with MS Office running in seamless mode and it works really well.

    • ReactOS is wine-based.

    • except REACTOS is unstable and not suitable for any real world use. Let's confine the discussion to things that actually work

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Either run native Linux apps, use a windows machine or a virtual machine.

  • I thought the usefulness of this died a long time ago with modern virtual machines. Especially since program like VMWare can run windows apps "natively" meaning the windows are outside the emulator and look like regular windows.

    I'm not trying to troll, but I'm genuinely interested. What benefit does WINE provide over a modern virtual machine program?

    • by Threni ( 635302 )

      You need need the heartache of a vm, with all the "tamagotchi" handholding that entails. Right now i can install wine, then an app, and...done. It works. I don't want to have to buy a copy of windows 7/xp/whatever, keep it patched all the time (boring), no i don't want windows 8, no i don't want to reboot etc etc.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      I thought the usefulness of this died a long time ago with modern virtual machines. Especially since program like VMWare can run windows apps "natively" meaning the windows are outside the emulator and look like regular windows.

      Correct me if I'm wrong, but VMWare can't run windows apps "natively". It creates a virtual machine that can run genuine Windows that can run windows apps.

      So you still need a genuine copy of Microsoft Windows.

    • Just guessing but I'd think a majority is gaming where dual boot is still an issue. Mainly because of the difficulty getting good graphics performance through a VM (i.e. older games using Direct3d exclusively). There's a few games that really do run great under Wine, every once in a while I'll fire up Flatout2 and it runs flawlessly.

  • - The built-in Wingdings font contains more glyphs. ...because...important, yes?

  • by Anonymous Coward

    .... it is still not mature enough to leave the 1.x. tag.

    Honestly, by now what is the point of WINE? The list of supported applications is so pathetically small (and ridiculously old) that I don't see any point of wasting time and effort on it. The world is moving away from Windows and even platform dependency.

    Wine is too little too late.

  • Windows as a lock-in platform is on life support and meanwhile Wine still doesn't run a single Windows application with perfect transparency.

    What's the point?

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