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Networking The Internet

DistroWatch Finally Adds Support For IPv6 (distrowatch.com) 112

We've frequently linked to DistroWatch for their coverage of Linux package and release announcements. Now an anonymous reader writes: The DistroWatch website introduced IPv6 support on Friday and the new protocol has been getting a lot of attention. "Over 8% of our traffic this weekend came from IPv6 addresses," commented DistroWatch contributor Jesse Smith. "It was a pleasant surprise, we were not expecting that many people would be using IPv6 yet."

When asked why DistroWatch enabled IPv6 access to their server at this time, Smith answered: "Partly it was an experiment to see how much interest there was in IPv6. Partly it was because it is a little embarrassing (in 2016) to have a technology focused website that is not making use of IPv6."

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DistroWatch Finally Adds Support For IPv6

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    Everybody should be using it, but nobody does. This has been the steady state for what, 20 years? We probably should re-do the thing and skip to IPv9 witha less grandiose than this second system but a nice and functional third. Perhaps with a different crew this time. That'd be nice.

    • Classic mistake. You declared it dead and propose to superseed it with something that doesn't fundamentally address the issue of IPv6's low adoption.

      As for being dead sign up for internet in the Netherlands and you'll be greeted with a fully public IPv6 address, and carrier grade NATing on your shared IPv4 address. We've only just run out of IPv4 addresses. It takes a conundrum for people to upgrade infrastructure. No one wants to maintain money on the status quo, call it human nature.

      • I have a vps hosted in Holland, $3.99US/Year and it comes with one ipv6 address and zero ipv4 ones.. If you want/need a v4 address, the vps now costs $27US/Year..

    • Everybody should be using it, but nobody does. This has been the steady state for what, 20 years? We probably should re-do the thing and skip to IPv9 witha less grandiose than this second system but a nice and functional third. Perhaps with a different crew this time. That'd be nice.

      What non-breaking technological solutions are you proposing?

    • by Bengie ( 1121981 )
      IPv6 Internet traffic has been doubling since 2000. The problem is IPv4 traffic has also been about doubling. Most of IPv6's increase has been canceled out by IPv4's increase. From 2014-2015 it went from ~2.5%-5%, and 2015-2016 5%-10%. It's having exponential growth as a percentage. Assuming it can sustain its current rate of growth, we'll have about 100% IPv6 in 3 more years. I doubt this will happen, but it's growing quickly.
  • by QuietLagoon ( 813062 ) on Sunday June 05, 2016 @03:08PM (#52255109)

    Partly it was because it is a little embarrassing (in 2016) to have a technology focused website that is not making use of IPv6."

    Amazon AWS, are you listening?

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by steffann ( 151248 )

      Apparently they are: https://www.facebook.com/group... [facebook.com]

      The interesting bit:

      One colleague was on a webinar with AWS yesterday and sent me this choice quote: "We are making a big announcement about IPv6 next week. Watch our blog and you'll see a lot of support."

  • by redelm ( 54142 )

    IPv6 would change the Internet fundamentally as it ends privacy and anonymity. Your 128-bit address most often will contain your device's 48-bit hardware MAC directly in the lower 64 bits (split by FE:FE). That MAC can track you across networks. Cookies become superfluous except as session variable holders (shopping cart). And for everything IP (incl UDP), not just HTTP[S].

    Yes, I'm aware that DHCPv6 servers might anonymize the interface address, locally translating (hiding) the MAC as NATv4 currently does.

    • by Anonymous Coward
      You should check out RFC 4941 [ietf.org] for temporary IPv6 addresses. If you take a look at your IPv6 interfaces on a Mac or Windows PC you'll see those temporary addresses. This addresses (ha!) the problem you refer to.
    • by 31eq ( 29480 )

      You can enable IPv6 privacy extensions in Network Manager. Any conspiracy powerful enough to prevent you doing this would have outlawed IPv4 long ago.

      • by redelm ( 54142 )
        Yes, it can be done by those knowledgeable or motivated enough. What percent of users? 1%? Commercially, they can be ignored (sites don't work). For prosecution, they can be focussed upon.
        • Yes, it can be done by those knowledgeable or motivated enough. What percent of users? 1%?

          I didn't have to do anything, and my PC started using privacy extensions for IPv6.

          .
          Please take your tin-foil hat somewhere else....

        • by raymorris ( 2726007 ) on Sunday June 05, 2016 @06:56PM (#52256127) Journal

          Well, it's the default setting for the operating systems favored by those "less knowledgeable", so that pretty much covers that, doesn't it. Android (the world's most popular OS), Windows (your grandparents most popular OS), and iOS (hipsters most popular OS) all randomize the address by default.

          Whether or not that's a GOOD idea is certainly debateable, but it's what you wanted.

          So the less knowledgeable, people who don't even know what IPv6 is, get a randomized address. People even less knowledgeable than that make panicky, mis-informed posts on Slashdot about OMG I'll be tracked.

    • In the Netherlands, 99% of the people have a fixed IPv4 address. For anonymity it doesn't really matter if your IPv4 address is fixed or your IPv6 address is fixed. And in both cases your ISP can both you IP address to a name/address. In any case, IP address != person.

      • by redelm ( 54142 )
        Thank you for the data. I believe it near-static IPs are also common in the US. But not for workplace computers, hotels or other hotspots. The idea is not to have absolute anonymity -- that can be abused. But tracing logs is work that would only be done for "cause". Harvesting MACs (via router unimplimented Privacy Extentions) is too easy, and would lead to automated commercial dragnets. Rather as the "Do Not Track" request is implemented as "Market with increased subtlety".
        • Privacy extensions are implemented on the end host, not the router. But a router can always see the MAC addresses of directly-connected machines anyway regardless of IP address. That's the case even in a completely v4-only network.

  • And Slashdot...? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by KiloByte ( 825081 ) on Sunday June 05, 2016 @03:41PM (#52255289)

    it was because it is a little embarrassing (in 2016) to have a technology focused website that is not making use of IPv6

    Hmm... then let's see the aaaa records for slashdot.org...

  • by ledow ( 319597 ) on Monday June 06, 2016 @02:04AM (#52257539) Homepage

    You can use the sarcastic "finally" in the headline when you publish a single AAAA record, Slashdot, that "news for nerds" who can't be nerdy enough to turn on IPv6 themselves but are happy to report on it all the time.

  • I hear they say it's embarrassing to have a technology-related web site without IPv6 in 2016:

    potomac:~ carlos$ host slashdot.org
    slashdot.org has address 216.34.181.45
    slashdot.org mail is handled by 10 mx.sourceforge.net.
    potomac:~ carlos$ host www.slashdot.org
    www.slashdot.org has address 216.34.181.48
    potomac:~ carlos$

    Where are your quad-A records ?

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