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Google Security Communications Network Networking Privacy The Internet Windows

Google Preparing 'Invisible ReCAPTCHA' System For No User Interaction (bleepingcomputer.com) 57

An anonymous reader quotes a report from BleepingComputer: Google engineers are working on an improved version of the reCAPTCHA system that uses a computer algorithm to distinguish between automated bots and real humans, and requires no user interaction at all. Called "Invisible reCAPTCHA," and spotted by Windows IT Pro, the service is still under development, but the service is open for sign-ups, and any webmaster can help Google test its upcoming technology. Invisible reCAPTCHA comes two years after Google has revolutionized CAPTCHA technologies by releasing the No CAPTCHA reCAPTCHA service that requires users to click on one checkbox instead of solving complex visual puzzles made up of words and numbers. The service helped reduce the time needed to fill in forms, and maintained the same high-level of spam detection we've become accustomed from the reCAPTCHA service. The introduction of the new Invisible reCAPTCHA technology is unlikely to make the situation better for Tor users since CloudFlare will likely force them to solve the same puzzle if they come from IPs seen in the past performing suspicious actions. Nevertheless, CloudFlare started working on an alternative.
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Google Preparing 'Invisible ReCAPTCHA' System For No User Interaction

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  • by pushing-robot ( 1037830 ) on Monday December 05, 2016 @07:48PM (#53428817)

    Their last system made me uncomfortable. [imgur.com]

  • I've been curious about those "I'm not a robot" checkboxes. How does it differentiate between a humsn and script checking that box?
    I've guessed that it had to do with timing of page load vs checkbox, or with tracking mouse movements for human-like movements.
    Anyone have the scoop?

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      It does both, along with other heuristics. If it detects a normal delay in reaching the checkbox and normal mouse movements it will usually let you proceed. If it's suspicious, because the box was checked too quickly, or the mouse movements were unnatural (or the pointer jumped without following a patch), or the traffic follows a common pattern, it will display a secondary test. That test will be text recognition, or pattern recognition that's easy for a human but tough for a computer (choose all squares th

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Thank you - you just explained why I *always* end up having to do the secondary test. I habitually use tab to step between elements and space to select, skipping the mouse entirely. Might try using the mouse next time and see what happens.

      • Easy for a human [deccanchronicle.com], you say?

      • It does both, along with other heuristics. If it detects a normal delay in reaching the checkbox and normal mouse movements it will usually let you proceed. If it's suspicious, because the box was checked too quickly, or the mouse movements were unnatural (or the pointer jumped without following a patch)

        So how does THAT work on touch screens? Delay might still be there, but I typically don't drag my finger over the screen to reach a checkbox.

    • by alci63 ( 1856480 )
      It might also be more low tech than said : apparently, it is also relying on a cookie to retain information about your authenticity !! https://www.shieldsquare.com/s... [shieldsquare.com]
  • I've been doing something similar for years. It's probably not as complex as what google is doing, but with little more than a few tricks with a hashed timestamp, and making sure that javascript works, it stops most bots.

    • by szy ( 4052287 )
      Javascript requirement is sad if like me, you're blocking it by default on non-whitelisted sites.
  • If it's like their previous attempts at CAPTCHA-less CAPTCHAs this will involve taking information like mouse movements and your browser fingerprint, and then analyzing that to decide if you're human. Deeply concerning. Google already knows enough about my browsing habits by having their scripts embedded everywhere.

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