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Google Mobile Search Shows Recipe Suggestions When You Look For Food (engadget.com) 26

In the past few years, Google has used its so-called "knowledge graph" to make search results far more useful than just a list of links -- you can get lots of info on a variety of topics right in Google without having to click on any search results. The latest addition to Google search is something foodies should take note of. Now, when you search for food on mobile, you'll see a carousel of recipes at the top of the results page. From a report on Engadget: Google also added some filters to those recipe results -- right below the search bar are additional suggestions you can use to refine your results. Searching for "fried chicken" gave me the option to add "oven-fried," "buttermilk," and "southern fried" filters to narrow down the recipes. You can also tap "view all" to move out of the standard search page and see bigger, more detailed recipe cards that show a picture and quick preview of the recipe.
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Google Mobile Search Shows Recipe Suggestions When You Look For Food

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  • by Trax3001BBS ( 2368736 ) on Thursday December 29, 2016 @03:14PM (#53574007) Homepage Journal

    Or at the least once was.

    Back when Fidonet was as close to the Internet as one could get (affordably). It was evident that one of the most popular subject within the Usenet were the trading of recipes. Something I never expected, the popularity and the amounts (recipes) available in that area were just vast.

    I never followed the subject further than that spending my time in other areas; but still curious that while Usenet sex/files/hacks/banter went hand in hand, never once heard of areas trading recipes other than being just another newsgroup. It was something one (I) stumbled across, as if many participated yet dare not talked about it.

    • by hey! ( 33014 ) on Thursday December 29, 2016 @04:49PM (#53574775) Homepage Journal

      It was evident that one of the most popular subject within the Usenet were the trading of recipes. Something I never expected, the popularity and the amounts (recipes) available in that area were just vast.

      It's not so surprising if you think of it as a kind of porn.

      Surveys show that almost 1/3 of Americans don't know how to cook. And this more shocking given that the bar for what constitutes "cooking" has been dropping. When I learned to cook one of the first things I learned was to bone a chicken -- something admittedly I haven't done in twenty years. My grandparents generation would have learned how pluck a chicken. Today buying a seasoned chicken breast and throwing it in the oven is "cooking".

      I go to the supermarket and produce and meat sections have shrunk to make room for burgeoning frozen and microwave convenience foods. We are a country where you can literally buy frozen peanut butter and jelly sandwiches [smuckers.com].

      And yet at the same time cable TV is choked with cooking "reality" shows and how-to shows where food which is prepared that it is a fair bet that not one in a hundred viewers would attempt. I'd lay even odds that not one in thousand on some of the recipes. And the number of cookbooks that are published have gone up by 50% since 2002.

      The inevitable conclusion is that there is a growing body of people who read about cooking, watch shows about cooking, but do not cook themselves.

      • I've been cooking all of my life (latch key kid. Parents expected dinner when they got home). The primary reason that I don't go out to restaurants is that the food sucks, even in some high end places. As a benefit, I can make 6 meals for the price of one trip to the restaurant. My last restaurant trip was taking a friend to "The Olive Garden". It sucked, but she wanted to go and it cost me $50. That's a week's worth of food at the grocery (I went there last night) and could have included the ingredients t
        • by hey! ( 33014 )

          Oh, I agree. Cooking can be complicated, but only if you want it to be. Julia Child's recipes are amazing, but insanely complicated. Mark Bittman's recipes on the other hand are simple, fun and reliable -- I just bought his beginner cookbook [amazon.com] for my college student daughter and she is thrilled to be making delicious food from scratch instead of instant ramen.

          I grew up in a restaurant family and I love to go out to eat, but I can't wrap my brain around people ordering something like hamburgers. Stuff that's

          • Even better than cookbooks is youtube. Seriously, there is every conceivable foodstuffs there and it's really not a lot of work. Even complicated stuff is maybe 20 minutes of actual work and the rest is sitting around time. I invested in a $5 kitchen timer and have yet to burn something. You'd think that most "nerds" would have completed a chemistry class and I've yet to find a recipe as complicated as anything as on nurdrage.
  • I hope not literally mobile.

    The last thing we need when driving is to have Google pop up a bunch of recipes. Restaurants, yes, cooking info, not very likely.

    Save the recipe suggestions for when the mobile isn't mobile. In fact, pretty much anywhere that isn't home. Unless explicitly asked for, anyway.

  • The future is NOW.

  • There's not much gets past these guys, is there?

  • I typed Nougat and the first hit was for a green robot!

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