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Windows Microsoft The Media Upgrades

CNET Editor Rails Against Non-Consensual Windows Updates (cnet.com) 498

schwit1 shares this angry commentary from a CNET senior editor: Maybe you're delivering a presentation to a huge audience. Maybe you're taking an online test. Maybe you just need to get some work done on a tight deadline. Windows doesn't care. Windows will take control of your computer, force-feed it updates, and flip the reset switch automatically — and there's not a damn thing you can do about it, once it gets started.

If you haven't saved your work, it's gone. Your browser tabs are toast. And don't expect to use your computer again soon; depending on the speed of your drive and the size of the update, it could be anywhere from 10 minutes to well over an hour before your PC is ready for work. As far as I'm concerned, it's the single worst thing about Windows. It's only gotten worse in Windows 10. And when I poked around Microsoft, the overarching message I received was that Microsoft has no interest in fixing it.

The editor recalls rebooting his Windows laptop while listening to a speech by Steve Jobs in 2010. (The reboot locked his computer for 20 minutes while updates were installed, "the first of three occasions that a forced Windows update would totally destroy my workflow at a critical moment.") He shares stories from other frustrated Windows users, urges readers to send him more anecdotes, and argues that Microsoft has even begun "actively getting rid of ways to keep users from disabling automatic updates."
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CNET Editor Rails Against Non-Consensual Windows Updates

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    Every day, all day, I do nothing but dodge the sophisticated attempts by countless software and hardware vendors to harass me in every way imaginable. Using a computer has become such a privacy, security and usability nightmare that I no longer feel the slightest joy in doing so. And nobody cares. At least nobody that matters in the least.

    • by Daemonik ( 171801 ) on Sunday January 29, 2017 @03:51AM (#53758109) Homepage

      Can't remember the last time I picked up a phone or a tablet and wasn't greeted by a system update screen, or a notification that 30 apps need to be updated minutes after walking away from a wifi hotspot.

      The real problem is that software developers exist in permanent beta, adding and removing features whenever they please. I kind of miss the pre-network days when software was delivered complete and didn't significantly change between versions.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        (Another AC here)

        No, the problem is that you are no longer perceived to have any options but to take what you're given. In the old days there were several different operating systems to chose from if one vendor fucked up, there were several office suites to chose from, and any computer would happily handle any of them.

        These days, Microsoft and their merry band of helpers are fervently tooling away at appropriating the PC platform so you bloody well cannot run anything but Windows, and a version of it that M

      • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 29, 2017 @04:14AM (#53758195)

        I found my first 6502 computer in my parent's attic last year. Dusted it off. Then dusted it off again. Worked exactly like brand new (after finding a free TV on craigslist). It was the most fun I had with a computer in over a decade. Spent $200 on ebay buying all the nifty things I could never afford as a kid, like a floppy drive, rs232 expansion port, printer and joystick.

        • Was it a VIC-20? You can find a "SD" video to VGA/HDMI converter box so you don't need that TV, but the picture you get on a CRT is special.

      • by Billly Gates ( 198444 ) on Sunday January 29, 2017 @05:56AM (#53758501) Journal

        There is a difference. Your phone doesn't randomly shutdown and install updates during an important call with no prompt or warning.

        I have no issue with notifications for updates or updates done nicely where it will schedule a time when YOU choose to reboot your device. Not the other way around ... Joke for slashdoter old-timers ... IN SOVIET UNION RUSSIA updates reboot YOU ... Wait a minute??

    • by thsths ( 31372 ) on Sunday January 29, 2017 @03:59AM (#53758139)

      That is absolutely true. "Using a computer" has become for "knowing how to work around bugs in the software". Updates are just one of the issues.

      Although to be honest, my Windows 10 PC upgrades over night as it should. Yes, your tabs are gone, but they reload at the press of a button, and the state of the tabs would mostly be stale, anyway. So my inconvenience has been quite limited.

    • Every day, all day, I do nothing but dodge the sophisticated attempts by countless software and hardware vendors to harass me in every way imaginable. Using a computer has become such a privacy, security and usability nightmare that I no longer feel the slightest joy in doing so. And nobody cares. At least nobody that matters in the least.

      Wouldn't it be better to use open-source software instead of proprietary? Then you would have more complete control over your computer's behaviour. I don't ever recollect Linux forcing updates on me at an inconvenient time. I have it set up to it just quietly informs me what updates are available, and I can choose whether and when to install them.

      Another point: as mentioned in https://it.slashdot.org/story/... [slashdot.org], a Stratus server has been running since 1993 without any forced shutdowns. I noticed the followin

      • by dwywit ( 1109409 ) on Sunday January 29, 2017 @06:09AM (#53758541)

        Obviously, it isn't connected to the Internet.

        That's not obvious at all. It has a very small attack surface (not many VOS instances around), running on highly specialised hardware. Can't run up one of those in a VM to test vulnerability. Lots of easier targets for the taking.

        Also, my Win 7 systems (6 desktops/laptops) and one XP machine run no anti-malware with the exception of noscript in their browsers, all run behind a consumer-grade ADSL2+ modem/router with a consumer-grade firewall, and guess what? WE DON'T GET MALWARE INFECTIONS, because we're smart enough to follow basic security practices.

        Some people need their hands held, and some don't. You can't lump us all in with the first category.

        • by Bert64 ( 520050 )

          The problem with "basic security practices" is that they are too much for most users to handle on a general purpose OS...

          How do you expect users to install application software? They download it and execute it, how do you expect them to tell a legitimate site from a malicious one?
          The answer for such users is the repository / app store model...

          The fact is general purpose operating systems are simply not suitable for the category of people who need their hands held, and these users make up the vast majority o

          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by quonset ( 4839537 )

            How do you expect users to install application software?

            Create a separate administrator account for when something needs to be installed or they need to tweak system settings. You log into it only when needed. All other times you run as a local user without admin privileges.

            how do you expect them to tell a legitimate site from a malicious one?

            First, install uMatrix in Firefox which will, under certain conditions, disallow a web page to load if it determines there is something malicious or off about the pag

            • How do you expect users to install application software?

              Create a separate administrator account for when something needs to be installed or they need to tweak system settings. You log into it only when needed. All other times you run as a local user without admin privileges.

              I suppose!

              You lose right off the bat there. There is no way that grandma is ever going to maintain multiple accounts on her computer, one with user, one with admin. The first time Grandma needs to log out of her user account because she needs admin privileges, will be the last time the user account gets used.

              how do you expect them to tell a legitimate site from a malicious one?

              First, install uMatrix in Firefox which will, under certain conditions, disallow a web page to load if it determines there is something malicious or off about the page. It is not foolproof, but it's a good line of defense.

              Second, by having uMatrix installed you can control to a very granular degree, what scripts and so forth are allowed to run on a page, thus reducing potential drive-bys.

              Grandma is looking forward to the installment, and has some programming improvements she made to the program, and will soon release her own, called Gramma's lockbox.

              Third, and this might take a bit of effort, don't go to places like Bob's House of Free Software.

              Granted, the last one is nothing more than common sense, but if people really want to lessen their chances of infections or ransomware getting on their machines, they might put in some effort to acquire some.

              So what you are saying is that M

  • by marked ( 67057 ) on Sunday January 29, 2017 @03:54AM (#53758121)

    From an article 10 months ago.

    https://tech.slashdot.org/stor... [slashdot.org]

    by marked on 07:47 PM May 4th, 2016 (#52047825) Attached to: Windows 10 Updates Are Now Ruining Pro-Gaming Streams
    As a somewhat hardened veteran of software installation, and the unbounded stupidity that arises from boneheaded mistakes that occur, I would like to point out the following:

    Windows 10 Update installation does not follow the guidelines for updating as explicitly laid out in your software, that is "we will update when you are not using the computer". To help matters further, we will specifically exclude during the following hours "8am to 5:30pm".

    So WHY THE FUCK WAS THERE AN UNCONTROLLED INSTALLATION OF AN OS UPDATE AT 4PM TODAY DURING THE TIME I WAS ACTIVELY USING THE SYSTEM? And when I say uncontrolled, it was not "oh click later to install, it was "we are rebooting now to install, OK". No deferral, no postponement, just instant notice.

    Not to mention that the reboot occurred during a very intense multiplayer fight that I was the host of, which effectively drop-kicked several players out into the ether without me being able to contact them to let them know what was going on.

    Did you mean 8am - to 5:30pm my local time, or that of the Microsoft HQ, in sunny whereever? It is bad enough that games developers can't actually remember how many days there are in April, yet to fuck up simple time management for updating has to be some fairly serious mismanagement on the part of senior design leads.

    Or could it be that it completely ignores it like the boneheaded mechanism that only allows 10hour "active" windows slot, because there is no possible reason why people at home could not be using it from 7 in the morning until midnight? or am I completely in the dark about usability that requires a 14 hour window to update on a daily basis?

    Of course to further the boneheaded-ness it completely fucked the graphics drivers, where it greenscreened just at idle on the desktop - to the point I had to continuously reboot until I could get to the stage where I could get a CMD prompt up and manage to type "shutdown /o /r /t 1" to get a relatively swift reboot into a mode where I say yes, I want to run a troubleshooting step, and reboot, and then select safe mode, and then reboot into it.

    Not to mention that it has been a known problem with the graphics drivers since the last update, and putting it down to "it is the responsibility of the driver manufacturers (Microsoft Engineer)" is disingenuous at best, as MS is supposed to have WHQL'd the drivers, which means that MS should have caught this problem much earlier in testing during the automated build and test phase.

    To top that then off, I can't run Microsoft EDGE because the "built in administrator account can't run it".... I can't run explorer because you've managed to switch of the command searching in the cortana interface, which means that I can't run taskmanager, command, etc. What stupidity of a design decision managed to get authorised to create this situation?

    The insider fast ring is supposed to be a way to bring light problems that exist in interaction with components. Fucking with AMD graphics drivers in this way isn't an acceptable manner of implementing software best practices.

    Now I have to spend an hour fucking around with Device driver uninstaller, because in the infinite wisdom, you've managed to disable any ability of the driver software to recognise that there is an installed device, so of course the programs bomb out with a "no recognised device" so we won't do anything remotely sensible like uninstall the graphics drivers. Then I have to spend an hour waiting whilst I roll back the installation, then reinstall drivers, then reboot, reset up profiles, and ... then reboot again. That is a considerable amount of unnecessary reboots as you rush to get untested, useless additions out into the population.

    Yours,

    Entirely Hacked Off

    • by marked ( 67057 )

      The only thing I have to say in followup is that Microsoft have made an improvement - Active hours have been extended to 18 hours (ie. I can set it from 11pm to 7am now) and miraculously have learned to actually use this time. Congratulations MS, slow-clap.

      And it has now worsened - prior to build 15002 the fast ring would allow you to defer the updates NOTIFIYING YOU that there was one available. Now you wake up in the morning to find, that yes, the computer has rebooted during the night and now you have to

    • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

      To top that then off, I can't run Microsoft EDGE because the "built in administrator account can't run it"....

      Wait... You are running a browser as root?!

    • by golodh ( 893453 ) on Sunday January 29, 2017 @05:54AM (#53758497)
      I wonder if you're running a retail version of MS Windows or a corporate one.

      As far as I'm aware the difference is that with the retail version, Miscrosoft takes the view that it has to perform system maintenance (like updates) for you. As part of what you buy. Of course, in such a setting it makes no sense to allow the end-user to postpone updates or any other systems maintenance. Microsoft might get sued if it doesn't patch certain vulnerabilities in time, so it can't have end-users interfering with its maintenance work. That's a conscious decision on Microsoft's part.

      With the corporate edition (as far as I'm aware) the IT department is in control, and IT (no pun intended) determines what when where and how updates will take place. Not you (the end user). Not Microsoft. The company IT department. Of course, the average IT department will honour requests that it should not interrupt ongoing work by users ... so it may offer them the standard option to delay updates (for at most 48 hours or so). Servers and such are under even tighter control by IT. Simply because most corporations will not accept anything less. Their interest in continuity of production is paramount and they have the means and the incentive to enforce their preferences. Most private customers don't.

      What this illustrates is a shift from the classic "I own it so I control it" idea to the "you're buying a service from us and we'll license you our software to deliver it - just don't get any funny notions about ownership" idea.

      It all depends on what packge you buy how you're treated. Buy a consumer grade package, get consumer grade treatment. You're lucky they don't display adds (yet) while updating and then require you to press a button every minute (or they'll stop the updating process until you do).

      • by Kjella ( 173770 )

        Microsoft might get sued if it doesn't patch certain vulnerabilities in time, so it can't have end-users interfering with its maintenance work.

        [citation needed]

        We have decades of history from Microsoft and the software industry as a whole and indeed product liability in general, has anyone ever been successfully sued for failing to enforce a patch, fix or recall on someone else's property after the user has been notified and has delayed, refused or ignored it? If I refuse to hand over my Samsung Note 7 it's not like Samsung can send a SWAT team to collect it. It's not like Ford can go impound cars that have ignored a recall. I can't think of any l

    • The setting is adjustable and Windows does in fact obey it. You can custom set your own active time (your own timezone), and on top of that specify the exact reboot time.

      But then you're trying to run a Microsoft browser with administrator privileges so I don't really peg you for a clever user.

      • by marked ( 67057 )

        > The setting is adjustable
        No, it DIDN'T.

        > and Windows does in fact obey it.
        No, it DIDN'T

        >You can custom set your own active time (your own timezone), and on top of that specify the exact reboot time.
        You can NOW. You couldn't THEN.

        Do you want to try and be a little more condescending? possibly with the ability to have some accuracy in what you are talking about?

        Or would you like to try some COMPREHENSION first, or is that civility a bit beyond you?

        > But then you're trying to run a Microsoft brow

        • Do you want to try and be a little more condescending?

          Sure. Combined with the fact you're logged in as an administrator you also think people will listen to you more if YOU randomise random WORDS, so you're not much of a communicator either.

      • It's worse than that, he's actually logged in using the administrator account. Not an account with admin privs, but the built-in account that nobody uses because it's too dangerous. Which makes me wonder whether the rest of what he saw was related to that.

        Oh, and to get to the topic at hand: while I completely agree Windows Update's current policies are ridiculous (hey, it's 1995 all over again when Windows will restart and lose all your work, except at least back then it was because of bugs in the opera

  • by Njorthbiatr ( 3776975 ) on Sunday January 29, 2017 @03:54AM (#53758127)

    Because games run on it. If the games I wanted to play worked on Linux, I would be using it exclusively.

    I had a forced restart and I promptly did registry edits and installed Ubuntu. Now I do all my work in Linux, and the only thing Windows could possibly do is kick me out of some online game. It's like they want people who like their platform to switch.

    • If you really must play games on a computer (why?) is there anything stopping you using one computer for games and another for work?

      • by Tukz ( 664339 )

        It seems he is using the same computer for both.
        To me it reads like he has a dual boot.

        No need to have 2 computers, when you can have multiple operation systems installed on the same computer.

        • Except switching operating systems shuts down all background services. You can't keep, say, music or group chat going during a reboot, especially because Windows games want to run on a copy of Windows installed on bare metal rather than in VirtualBox. And how does one sync browser tabs between operating systems in a dual boot configuration, including form contents that have been entered but not yet submitted?

    • You don't need to do registry edits, just disable the Windows Update service. Don't set it to "Manual" as it'll be restarted anyway, set it to "Disabled".

      Remember to re-enable it once in a while when you do run updates, as you can't manually check for updates or install them without the Windows Update service running.

    • This. I only use Windows for three things: gaming, the few times a year I have to use some Adobe product, and the few times a year LibreOffice cannot make sense of some xlsx or docx mess that I've been sent.

      Sadly, Windows is still firmly entrenched in companies. This is unlikely to change any time soon.

    • These all run games too

    • I had the same issue as you. I ended up choosing against the pain.
      Of my ~360 Steam games at the time, only roughly 170 were working on Linux, a few more with Wine. Of course the 30 games I bought since are working fine : the more of us are switching, the faster the editors will follow.

      Wine should be the next most important project for gamers on Linux.
      You can already have the Witcher 3 menu working now [winehq.org] which I find amazing, alas not the game itself (deferred shading support issue I think).

  • The timings of the updates are only part of it. I'm running linux at home, but previously used Windows 7 and still do at work. When an update is due, Windows goes all wobbly. Last week's update, which didn't reboot, left me unable to connect to the interweb due to a 'socket error'. Updated, rebooted and all fine.

    Now this could be good ol' coincidence, but it follows on from years of similar flaky performance when delaying an update. Not all of them, but plenty enough to plot on a graph and have confide

    • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

      The timings of the updates are only part of it. I'm running linux at home, but previously used Windows 7 and still do at work. When an update is due, Windows goes all wobbly. Last week's update, which didn't reboot, left me unable to connect to the interweb due to a 'socket error'. Updated, rebooted and all fine.

      Now this could be good ol' coincidence, but it follows on from years of similar flaky performance when delaying an update. Not all of them, but plenty enough to plot on a graph and have confidence i

      • All that you write is correct.

        My complaint really was that if even if it doesn't 'update' (i.e. automatically reboot), the upcoming change makes itself so unstable that it has to be updated, as the OS is now not functioning correctly. You'd think that when it asked you when you wanted updates not to occur, instability caused by the binary clashes would be part of that choice, not just an afterthought.

  • by melting_clock ( 659274 ) on Sunday January 29, 2017 @04:08AM (#53758165)

    I've seen Windows 10 updates make a computer unusable for hours, particularly for any application where a bit of processing power it needed. Forcing actions that interfere with the owner's use of a computer is another malware trait to add to the adware and spyware that MS bundled with Win 10. It is hard to believe that MS is actually getting away with this sort of behaviour. There are real consequences for Windows users, particularly those in small business that rely on MS products to operate their business but are too small to have the extra control that MS might allow large companies.

    Problems with Windows are only going to get worse. Many businesses are unwilling to give up Win 7 and put up with the shit that MS is trying to force on them with Win 10. The same customers mostly avoided Win 8 so are using a OS that MS will abandon, without supplying a functional replacement. MS seems to be completely lost and confused, with an attitude of refusing to give customers what they want but still expecting them to buy their crap.

    If Linux companies are smart about this, there could be a huge jump in Linux adoption that convinces more software companies to port their products to Linux. Time will tell. I know from personal experience that it has been very easy to get Win 10 users ready to try Linux.

    Windows is losing relevancy as the shift to mobile devices continues and many people no longer need a desktop OS. A sign of just how significant this has become is MS releasing several products onto Android. There are an increasing number of large developers that have little interest in Windows, preferring to focus on other platforms. If MS loses their near monopoly of the desktop OS market, their whole world could come crashing down very quickly.

  • by Torin Darkflight ( 851576 ) on Sunday January 29, 2017 @04:13AM (#53758187)
    I agree wholeheartedly, the fact that Windows 10 by default will just randomly reboot itself on a whim to install updates is INFURIATING. However, after some research, I found a way to stop it from automatically rebooting that has worked for me for several months so far.

    First, we need to disable the mechanism that actually performs the automatic reboot after installing updates...
    -Open Task Scheduler (Start, type "Task" and it'll appear in the results)
    -Expand Task Scheduler Library>Microsoft>Windows>WindowsUpdate
    -Delete the "Reboot" task
    The task that performs the reboot is now gone, but we're not done yet.

    Next, we need to prevent Windows from re-creating the automatic reboot task, which has reportedly happened spontaneously on some computers, most often during build upgrades...
    -Hit WinKey+R and enter %systemroot%\System32\Tasks\Microsoft\Windows\UpdateOrchestrator to open that folder
    -Delete the file named "Reboot"
    -Create a new FOLDER named "Reboot"
    Since a folder named Reboot now exists, Windows won't be able to re-create the task file named Reboot.

    As I said, doing this has worked for me for several months now, but of course YMMV applies here, especially if Microsoft ever decides to surreptitiously find a way to work around our attempts to take back ownership of our computers and crush us underfoot even harder for daring to defy them. :p
  • by cerberusss ( 660701 ) on Sunday January 29, 2017 @04:28AM (#53758235) Homepage Journal

    Please excuse my ignorance, but I really only use macOS and Linux on the server. So when you get updates, macOS will display a prompt:\

    Update available
    [now] [tonight] [ask tomorrow]

    I can't imagine that Windows FORCES you to stop your work right there and then, with no way to delay it. Is that really so?

    • Exactly. Now sit back and wait for the tidal wave of replies consisting essentially of: "yes, BUT..."

    • I can't imagine that Windows FORCES you to stop your work right there and then, with no way to delay it. Is that really so?

      No it's not.
      Windows gives you a choice of hours where it won't ever reboot for updates.
      Windows gives you the choice to specify the exact time to reboot for updates.
      When that time comes windows gives you the choice to delay.

    • By default, it runs an update and reboots at a time it thinks you're not working. So while it won't stop you from working right there and then, it will wipe out any unsaved changes if you walk away from your PC for too long a period of time.

      In theory you can set quiet hours which would be the only hours it does this check. In practice, the functionality is flawed (W10 has rebooted on me when I've stepped away from it at work for a meeting, despite quiet hours being outside working hours, because I'd manu

  • by ukoda ( 537183 ) on Sunday January 29, 2017 @04:38AM (#53758267) Homepage
    I have only been using Linux at home for many years now and in my last job I was only using Linux too, so had not really used a Windows system for a few years when I started using it again for my current job. My first impression was that it was much more stable and usable than in the past, but still inferior to Linux in usability for my type of usage. The stand out exception where Windows has got worse was forced updates. Such a huge distraction and nuisance and feels so primitive compare to Linux. Maybe they will sort it one day, but I suspect I will move on to job that does not force me to use Windows before they fix it.
  • by Jack9 ( 11421 ) on Sunday January 29, 2017 @04:38AM (#53758269)

    An article about a problem that has existed for years as if it's a big deal recently. Why would I follow this link unless I just wanted to hear more salty MS tears?

  • "Scheduled restarts."

    What's the problem? I've never run into it. And I hated the idea of moving to Windows 10.
  • by garlicbread2 ( 4853285 ) on Sunday January 29, 2017 @05:43AM (#53758449)

    1. make sure you have the "Pro" version of Windows 10
    2. type in "gpedit.msc" into your start menu bar and hit return
    3. you should now have a window called "Local Group Policy Editor"

    4. drill down into Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Update
    5. Double click the "Configure Automatic Updates" setting
    6. Select "Enabled" to state that you want to specify / override this setting
    7. In the bit on the bottom left change this to "2 - Notify for download and notify for install", this should prevent the updates from kicking in without intervention
    8. Click Okay and close the policy window

    You can now ignore the updates or install them whenever you want
    I swear to god some people are just so lazy they have to bitch and moan about everything

    • by Zumbs ( 1241138 )

      1. make sure you have the "Pro" version of Windows 10

      And what happens if you have the Home or OEM version of windows 10? You know, the one most people get when they get a new computer? Or when they accidentally "upgrade" from Windows 7, 8 or 8.1? That's right, they can't change the group policies!

      • One way is to enable "metered connection" on the network connection
        http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/how... [pcadvisor.co.uk]
        that's probably the simplest way

        Another way
        https://4sysops.com/archives/d... [4sysops.com]

        dump the following into a .reg file and run it

        Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

        [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate]

        [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate\AU]
        "NoAutoUpdate"=dword:00000001

  • by cfalcon ( 779563 ) on Sunday January 29, 2017 @06:13AM (#53758551)

    Windows users will put up with ANYTHING. They'll bitch and moan, but they'll never change anything. A small number will switch to Macs, which are expensive, but actually still behave like computers. As punishment, they'll have to deal with all the programs that are Windows only, of which there's usually one that just won't work right on a Mac to bother everyone. An even smaller number will switch to Linux, which can be a hassle, and has quite a few programs whose programmers are absolutely dedicated to the cause of preventing them from running on Linux.

    But it is this absolute unwillingness to switch which has empowered Microsoft to be so shit in the first place. And of course, you CAN disable Windows updates if you are smart enough and desperate enough- even if you run out of ways (and Microsoft has nuked plenty of them), you can always block the bastards at the router. That escape hatch keeps enough of the top tier techies willing to put up with Windows on their personal machines.

    Windows 10 is an absolute shitshow. And every Windows 10 user deserves every shitty minute.

    • by Kjella ( 173770 )

      I really doubt many people stick with Microsoft because of the brand or that they're fans. If they haven't switched it's because the alternatives haven't been viable. The way Apple are treating their Macs right now I wouldn't buy. As for Linux I've done that switch and used it as my primary desktop (2007-2010) but just the running annoyances were enough that I gave up after years of hoping the next release would finally be the one to shave off the rough edges. I did give it a go in a VM a little while ago b

    • by Osgeld ( 1900440 )

      the biggest whiners are the clueless idiots, its seriously not even a problem if one is a classicly trained "save your fucking shit before you leave" computer user, instead of one of these ranting baffons, ya know the same fuckwits that never let the screen of their I phone turn off

  • Hello,

    I guess it was a slow day at CBS Interactive's CNet web site, or perhaps they are not very familiar with using Windows. This behavior can easily be disabled by a simple registry tweak. Here's a .REG file which does exactly that:

    Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate\AU]
    "NoAutoRebootWithLoggedOnUsers"=dword:00000001

    If you would rather script it using a .CMD file, that's easy enough, too. You can even do it in one line:

    REG ADD

  • by Epsillon ( 608775 ) on Sunday January 29, 2017 @06:58AM (#53758701) Journal
    And when I poked around Microsoft, the overarching message I received was that Microsoft has no interest in fixing it.

    I am beginning to wonder is MSFT is actively trying to kill off the Windows platform. Certainly, none of their recent actions make me in any way doubt my choice to go nowhere near it for serious computing. They're either betting on something being a bigger revenue stream, such as a cloudy OS, or they're (by "they're" I mean the SatNad) incredibly stupid. Either way, their statement that Windows 10 will be the last Windows you will ever buy was probably very true for a significant number of people, organisations and public sector bodies.
  • by sanf780 ( 4055211 ) on Sunday January 29, 2017 @07:05AM (#53758733)
    I wonder how RHEL and my local IT group can keep the workstation I use in working condition without asking to restart the workstation at all...
  • If you have the professional version windows will ask if you want to reboot and you can delay it and then keep delaying it for as long as you want. If I am in the middle of something I will normally tell it to delay for 4 hours and the system already does not check for updates at all during the normal working hours I set.

    All of these issues I have run into are people using the home version for work. You can do this but it does come with drawbacks as a result.

  • by 140Mandak262Jamuna ( 970587 ) on Sunday January 29, 2017 @07:34AM (#53758815) Journal
    My Win10 updates had a setting buried somewhere. It allows me to set working hours and it will not do a forced update at the working hours. OK, at least some control, I thought. This is my home machine, so I will set my "working" hours to be 5 PM and 8AM that way the home machine update will happen when I am at my office.

    No dice, starting hour can not be later than earlier hour! It would not let me set it up this way. I could force the winodws update to a narrow window between midnitght and 3 AM.

    It clearly shows how badly the managers and UI guys in Microsoft think. Why call it working hours? Allow me to specify update hours. Why just one block of time? Why can't you show me a check boxes in 3 hour blocks and let me pick a block to update?.

    The will help people working at odd hours, working on split shifts, etc. I am sure the idea, suggestions and counter proposals came up. Still MS did it in this brain dead way because, it wants to balance the load on its servers. If it gives "too much" freedom everybody will choose 3AM to 6AM block and so to reduce the load on its servers, it deliberately decided to serve about 80% of the user base to reduce complaints.

  • I was really hoping that Microsoft would realize their blunder, as they did with Vista and 8, but it looks like they aren't seeing it. I'm guessing maybe they have one more release before 7 is dead, but I'm no longer hopeful.
  • Gather the hours that the reboot cost you in time. Apply you standard consultant rate for your field. That's how much money the update is worth to you. Bill Microsoft or take them to small claims court. If they don't send a representative, they will lose. Then send them the requirement that they for the judgement. If enough people do this, then they will stop behaving this way. It's death by a million cuts. The time and effort it takes to deal with each tiny lawsuit against them for taking over your

  • And MS is new to this. They have released a version of their long awaited Windows, and being extra careful, they want to make sure that when 1-dot-oh hits the streets, and boots itself in your sleep, you will wake up and find your coffee and PC ready and waiting for you to start.

    What do you mean it's TEN? Oh, wait...

    (Head quietly explodes)

  • From a personal point of view, I think automatic updates are all well and good. If it keeps the teeming masses of non-tech people up to date on their software patches, I think that reduces the risks for us all, kind of like vaccinations.

    What we do need, however, is better control over it.

    For instance, I note that I can set "active hours" on windows update that it won't do updates from such to such time. This is good, in theory, but it isn't flexible enough, because it has a hard limit of a 12h span. As some

  • by BrendaEM ( 871664 ) on Sunday January 29, 2017 @10:39AM (#53759527) Homepage

    There are times that users just can't have resource grabbing happen, such as 3D printing. The latency from even checking for updates, can ruin a studio recording. Windows 10 rebooting options are poorly thought out. What if you cannot have your computer reboot anytime in the near future?

  • by eric31415927 ( 861917 ) on Sunday January 29, 2017 @10:44AM (#53759551)

    If you need your Windows 10 computer to not update for a period of time, you may have to log in to your router and blacklist all Microsoft sites. When you are done work, you can log in again and allow your network to reach them again.

    • "all microsoft sites" is quite the confusing list you know. I'd like to see what your idea of that list is...

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