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GNOME Open Source Operating Systems Software Linux

GNOME 3.24 Released (softpedia.com) 118

prisoninmate quotes a report from Softpedia: GNOME 3.24 just finished its six-month development cycle, and it's now the most advanced stable version of the modern and popular desktop environment used by default in numerous GNU/Linux distributions. It was developed since October 2016 under the GNOME 3.23.x umbrella, during which it received numerous improvements. Prominent new features of the GNOME 3.24 desktop environment include a Night Light functionality that promises to automatically shift the colors of your display to the warmer end of the spectrum after sunset, and a brand-new GNOME Control Center with redesigned Users, Keyboard and Mouse, Online Accounts, Bluetooth, and Printer panels. As for the GNOME apps, we can mention that the Nautilus file manager now lets users browse files as root (system administrator), GNOME Photos imitates Darktable's exposure and blacks adjustment tool, GNOME Music comes with ownCloud integration and lets you edit tags, and GNOME Calendar finally brings the Week view. New apps like GNOME Recipes are also part of this release. The full release notes can be viewed here. Softpedia notes in conclusion: "As mentioned before, it will take at least a couple of weeks for the new GNOME 3.24 packages to land on the stable repositories of your favorite distro, which means that you'll most probably be able to upgrade from GNOME 3.22 when the first point release, GNOME 3.24.1, is out on April 12, 2017."
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GNOME 3.24 Released

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 22, 2017 @05:05PM (#54091669)

    Said no one, ever.

    • by Hallow ( 2706 )

      You obviously never had to use Motif. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... [wikipedia.org]

      • by sconeu ( 64226 ) on Wednesday March 22, 2017 @05:13PM (#54091735) Homepage Journal

        Actually, I have, and would rather use Motif thatn GNOME.

        • by gfxguy ( 98788 )
          Yes, there are a number of you masochists out there. Back when I programmed on SGI, Motif was awesome (compared to others at the time).... so about 20 years ago. Now? Not so much.
        • Motif is more like GTK. Maybe you meant CDE? I'd always figure out how to add GNU tools and fvwm to those systems!

          • I thought that MOTIF/CDE were like the KDE of today, and that it was Open Look that didn't have a successor
          • Ugh, no. Nobody means CDE. Though frankly I'm not clear why anyone would use mwm when they could use fvwm2. It looks just as bad, out of the box it works pretty much the same way, but it has all the bells and whistles that we expect to at minimum be contained in a vaguely modern window mangler. I have used mwm without the rest of CDE — I forget what the panel was called, ISTR it had some long and descriptive name which is no doubt why I can't remember. But the panel was arse, whereas just good old mwm

          • by dbIII ( 701233 )
            There is a thing called "mwm" which stands for the motif window manager.
            Given how sloooooooow gnome can be at times despite using video acceleration hardware to attempt to make up for poor coding (problably in gtk and not the actual window manager) it's tempting to use almost anything else other than gnome once you have a few windows up.
            While the idea seems to have been to sacrifice speed for shiny it falls well behind on both to things like Enlightenment.
          • fvwm is the most common desktop where I work, by a large margin.

        • by arth1 ( 260657 ) on Wednesday March 22, 2017 @05:35PM (#54091857) Homepage Journal

          Actually, I have, and would rather use Motif thatn GNOME.

          I do use mwm. It works great. They haven't broken things like being able to paste into a window without changing z-order.
          I also use a hammer that isn't painted a uniform color and doesn't play El Condor Pasa when I hit something.
          It's not about bells and whistles, it's about productivity.

        • Actually, I have, and would rather use Motif thatn GNOME.

          I use a slightly modified WindowMaker (which means that I use a version I compiled myself after making a few changes). Many people are surprised at how minimal it is, but the productivity gains make it fully worth it.

      • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 22, 2017 @05:18PM (#54091759)

        I used CDE (and thus Motif) for many years. It may look outdated now, but it was years ahead of its time. While it may not be as usable as, say, GNOME 2 or KDE 3 were, it's actually still managed to be better to use than GNOME 3 or KDE 4+ have been. That's how far our "modern" open source desktop projects have regressed.

        Gedit, a simple text editor for GNOME, is a perfect example of how stupid things have gotten. This is what Gedit's UI used to look like [wikimedia.org], back before the GNOME 3 disaster. And this is a more recent GNOME 3 version [wikimedia.org] of Gedit. It's unbelievable how far it has regressed, and how quickly this has happened.

        And that's just a text editor! We see the same sort of nonsense throughout so much of GNOME 3. What were once usable and consistent menus and toolbars have been replaced with jumbled buttons and hamburger menus, among various other idiotic UI changes.

        What's worse is that all of these regressions are justified as making the applications "easier to use on tablets", yet most GNOME 3 users are likely using a desktop with a mouse! They've ruined the desktop's entire user experience for a class of users that doesn't even exist!

        Hate on Motif if you must. It and CDE provided a much better UI than GNOME 3 ever has or ever will.

        • by Bill Hayden ( 649193 ) on Wednesday March 22, 2017 @06:00PM (#54092003) Homepage

          I'd upvote you a thousand times if I had mod points today.

          Ubuntu (via Unity), GNOME, and Microsoft have all completely jumped the shark to support a class of users that, as best as I can tell, does not exist. I use Linux as my main work OS, day-in day-out. I know exactly zero people who use Ubuntu, GNOME, or Windows on tablets. These three are removing usability piece by piece to support a glorious future that no one wants. At least on Linux there are sensible UI alternatives like xfce that allow people like me to get work done, but that does not spare us from the destruction of useful apps running in that UI, like gedit as mentioned above.

          • by caseih ( 160668 )

            I know of quite a few people using Surface Pros and they love them. I've even heard of long-time mac users considering moving the Surface Pro. On the tablet, Windows 10 actually works pretty well. I recently bought an el cheap windows 10 tablet to do a bit of development on and it was surprising how usable it was. I still prefer my Android apps, but if you need to use traditional apps like MS office, they work surprisingly well on the tablet.

          • The Windows 10 UI would be fine if the latency issues could be fixed (it shouldn't take between two and ten seconds for the notifications area (always) or start menu (often) to appear): the real issues with Windows 10 are the privacy invasion crap and the underlying operating system.

            I'd like to see a real effort to build a modern 2-in-1 desktop for GNU/Linux, perhaps using Cinnamon as a starting point. It just takes someone who knows what they're doing, and wasn't born three days ago, completely unaware

          • The stupid thing is, you could easily make a secondary UI for tablet users and even protocols for a UI switch for when a tablet becomes a desktop (ie: docking).

            But, no. UIs are not built by engineers anymore. We've got to hire touchy-feely liberal arts guys that have no idea what good UI design means to make these decisions.

            For instance, I like the close/minimize/maximize buttons on the top left of the window. Linux Mint Cinnamon allows me to set that without a problem. But Gnome applications don't foll

        • I used CDE (and thus Motif) for many years. It may look outdated now, but it was years ahead of its time. While it may not be as usable as, say, GNOME 2 or KDE 3 were, it's actually still managed to be better to use than GNOME 3 or KDE 4+ have been.

          I have seen CDE a few times (e.g. on Solaris), and found it very unusable, so much so that installing KDE or GNOME was much easier than trying to just use CDE.

          While KDE 4.0 was very rough, and 4.1 only addressed the roughest edges, from 4.4 KDE has had almost complete feature-parity with KDE 3. At least they aren't applying non-optional Mac-like interfaces (where the menus are 100s of pixels away from the Window they apply to like GNOME 3). It's quite frustrating using GNOME 3 apps (about the only one I use

        • I looked at the screenshots and GNOME 3 looks better. Perhaps you can clarify your dissatisfaction? What I see:

          • Missing file browser: it is still in gedit 3.x, just not enabled in the screenshot
          • Some missing buttons: all of those are sill available where they should be — either in menu or context menu. All of those have keyboard shotcuts.
          • Reduced wasted space: button bar, menus and title bar are are now compressed in one, reducing waste by 50% (excluding tabs).
          • Some settings are more accessible: c
        • by EPDowd ( 770230 )
          Gnome 3 is for people who don't really use their computer and want it to look like a phone. I abandoned Gnome 3 shortly after gnome 3 came out and gnome removed their feedback section rather then hear that nobody liked gnome 3.
        • Upvote!! Totally agree - non existent tablet users
    • Hate Gnome. Love Unity.
    • Weird. Linus switched. You think it was because of fraud or coercion?
  • by Hognoxious ( 631665 ) on Wednesday March 22, 2017 @05:09PM (#54091703) Homepage Journal

    It is left as an exercise for the reader to make a sarcastic quip about systemd.

    • It is left as an exercise for the reader to make a sarcastic quip about systemd.

      I have one: people complain about Gnome. Maybe the reason is because Gnome is not part of systemd?

  • Can you actually still do anything, or have all useful features been removed?
    • by sjames ( 1099 )

      Just wait for the next version that will randomly poke the user in the eye. Users demand features so they're working on one.

    • Can you actually still do anything, or have all useful features been removed?

      I was going to ask which features had been removed this iteration! Restricting users options seems to be an ongoing trend with the Gnome.

      • It definitely is. Gedit has been cited already, but what pissed me off more is gnome-terminal: the double click selection behaviour cannot be configured in the GUI any more. You need a CLI command reminiscent of registry manipulations on Windows. Insanity for a terminal. The definition of a tool used by power users...
    • by jeremyp ( 130771 )

      Unfortunately not, due to a bug, you can still launch a web browser. Fortunately, there is a work around which is to make Google Chrome [slashdot.org] the default.

    • It seems you have issues reading release notes and user manuals. Have you got any mental issues that makes it difficult to read long technical texts? There is no shame in having such difficulties and help is available. For example dyslexia and ADHD are well studied conditions and there are tons of treatments and comping mechanisms developed. I would suggest you go to GP to get tested. If you have diagnosis, it will help you to navigate this world better -- even those with no apparent disorders can find the
  • by Anonymous Coward
    I used to be a diehard Gnome 2 fan, but I won't touch it with a ten-foot pole. A great example of the Gnome 3.X debacle is gedit. It used to be one of the best GUI editors in Linux. Now it's completely worthless, prone to crashes, can't correctly display text on large files, and generally unusable.
    • by caseih ( 160668 )

      Fortunately Gnome 2's gedit is alive and well in the form of the poorly-named xed (formerly Pluma). Still works very well and development is ongoing.

    • by afgam28 ( 48611 )

      I'm really surprised that you (and others) care so much about gedit. Regardless of whether we're talking about the gnome 2 gedit or the gnome 3 one, neither of them are serious text editors for power users.

      All it does is provide a simple-to-use default editor for new users (who edit text files very occasionally). It's like Notepad on Windows. And the current gedit serves this purpose just fine.

      Serious users will install a serious text editor (e.g. vim, emacs, sublime, atom). This was true back in the gnome

    • by dbIII ( 701233 )
      Insanely slow as well - so much so that the "X Sux" trolls use the new gedit as "proof" that X is slow.
  • By a mile, the best thing about Gnome is that you do not have to use it.
  • I preferred Gnome 2.x to KDE but when Gnome 3.0 came out, I jumped ship because they took a usable desktop and redesigned it for tablets and then tried to push it to desktop users. I chose something more lightweight and isn't ensnared in Systemd: LXQt. I use Linux so I don't have to put up with people's bullshit, not so I have to put up with the bullshit of different people.

    I see no reason why anyone should use Gnome anymore.

    • by doom ( 14564 )

      Been using icewm for nearly twenty years now, I rarely know what you guys are talking about.

      One of the nice things about icewm is no one ever re-designs the UI on you, so there are still keyboard alternates for everything.

      And no one had the bright idea to shove everything one click down in the hamburger.

      What I want to see is a cranky-old farts distro that maintains old versions of things any time someone changes the UI.

    • I jumped ship because they took a usable desktop and redesigned it for tablets and then tried to push it to desktop users.

      What made you think GNOME was designed for tablets? The 3.0 was totally unusable on tablets. Further releases got slightly better, but I have not seen any GNOME developer actively working on making it work on tablets, bar fixing bugs being reported. Was it the big application icons in grid layout and removal of “start menu”? This is a visual similarity at best and functionally very different:

      • To get to application list, you have to get in overview mode, press grid button and witch to “all
  • Last time I used it, the only way to modify the taskbars was to use a friggin' web browser, using a combination of an external website (and if that's down, you're SOL) and a browser plugin.

    Have they recognized how utterly stupid that is yet, or is that still the functionality for desktop users?

  • sunset mode (Score:2, Funny)

    by Rutulian ( 171771 )

    Prominent new features of the GNOME 3.24 desktop environment include a Night Light functionality that promises to automatically shift the colors of your display to the warmer end of the spectrum after sunset,

    Please tell me you're joking. ....
    OMG, you're not joking! Seriously, why is this a thing?

    • Seriously, why is this a thing?

      Because iOS has it? Not because it's like killer-app useful or anything, but just because, wow, that's neat, we oughta do that so that we can say we got that?

      Gnome has gone off the rails... rather than work on making it more useful, so people might want to use it and stick with it, they put all this effort into keep-up-with-the-Joneses sugar-coating shit? This has been going on for years! The Gnome project has their priorities fucked, kicking the bugs and non-useability down the road so they can toot abo

      • Seriously, why is this a thing?

        So someone held a gun to your head and forced you to use it? Go to distrowatch, and get one of the distros that doesn't cause you to blow your stack

      • Every project goes this way eventually. Firefox is usually the other poster child, right after GNOME. For my part, I really miss avant-window-navigator and compiz+emerald. For me that was kind of the apex of eye candy and usability. I haven't tried to build that stuff recently, but last time I gave it a shot, it was a long and uphill battle with very little satisfaction at the end.

    • by Trogre ( 513942 )

      Well it will be nice to not have to install Redshift for my GNOME users, but since most of my Linux users do not use GNOME as their desktop environment this isn't going to affect me much.

      A useful feature for GNOME users though, but hardly worth top billing in the feature list.

    • Re:sunset mode (Score:4, Informative)

      by Misagon ( 1135 ) on Wednesday March 22, 2017 @11:16PM (#54093461)

      No, that is a serious thing. Colour temperature of the ambient light around you affects with your day-night cycle. We are made to respond to the sun's light which is colder in the morning (to wake you up) and warmer in the evening (which helps you sleep).
      When the primary light source is your computer/device screen then that is what affects you the most.

      This has been covered several times before here on Slashdot. Some that are easy to find.
      Can Blocking Blue Light Help Bipolar Disorder As Well as Sleep Issues? [slashdot.org]
      Microsoft To Add Flux Like Night Mode In Windows 10, Rendering 3rd-Party App's Existence Useless [slashdot.org]

      However, I think that the change should not be abrupt but be gradual to better cohere with the sun's natural cycle. But I suspect that they chose to make it a special mode so as not to interfere with colour accuracy during work time.

      Myself, I wish that I could also get LED bulbs that changed colour temperature gradually depending on the time of day, and that they wouldn't be expensive and hackable (Like Phillips ... ). I live in the North where some winter days are darker than summer nights, and thus artificial light is important all day.

      • by jbengt ( 874751 )

        . . . the sun's light which is colder in the morning (to wake you up) and warmer in the evening (which helps you sleep)

        Sorry, but this is just not true.

      • ...Myself, I wish that I could also get LED bulbs that changed colour temperature gradually depending on the time of day, and that they wouldn't be expensive and hackable (Like Phillips ... ). I live in the North where some winter days are darker than summer nights, and thus artificial light is important all day.

        I wanted to try Phillips wake-up [amazon.ca] light but thought they were too expensive for something that might not work
        I had an old digital picture frame that wasn't being used by a family member.
        I quickly created and saved about 50 pictures that gradually moved from black to orange to yellow.
        photoshop -> adjust brightness -> save
        I set the digital picture frame to auto turn on at 6am. It worked!
        embarrassing hack? maybe.

  • by flacco ( 324089 ) on Wednesday March 22, 2017 @07:21PM (#54092435)

    There is a perplexing amount of GNOME hate in the top comments. I'm a very happy user. I've been using Linux almost exclusively in all capacities since about 1999 and have sampled and/or used a lot of desktop environments. GNOME is the best, IMHO.

    • There is a perplexing amount of GNOME hate in the top comments. I'm a very happy user. I've been using Linux almost exclusively in all capacities since about 1999 and have sampled and/or used a lot of desktop environments. GNOME is the best, IMHO.

      If its what you like, it's all you need. Too many slashdot users seem to think that something they don't like must suck.

    • by dbreeze ( 228599 )

      Damn you happy Gnome user, and your HO... No one likes a party pooper.

    • I've also been using Linux for the same amount of time as my primary dev platform. I, like many others, hated Gnome 3 when it first came out. I still grumble about it when something weird breaks, but I wouldn't go back to Gnome 2 now if you paid me. Gnome shell with the right extensions is in fact now my favorite desktop. I wish more things were customizable but with extensions I can get most of what is needed to make it the way I want it. I don't care if those who prefer MATE or whatever use that inst

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