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Communications Entertainment

Like Netflix? T-Mobile Is Giving it Away For Free (cnet.com) 105

Roger Cheng, writing for CNET: T-Mobile and Netflix are new BFFs. The primary beneficiaries of this new friendship will be subscribers to T-Mobile's "One" unlimited data plans, many of whom will get access to Netflix for free, T-Mobile CEO John Legere said on an "Un-carrier Next" webcast video on Wednesday. But the freebie only works if you have at least two T-Mobile One unlimited data plans (single line customers are out of luck). The free Netflix access arrives on Sept. 12. The alliance is just the latest proof that the worlds of video and mobile are colliding. AT&T is in the process of buying Time Warner -- home of "Game of Thrones" and Batman -- so it can own more of the content you watch, and has bundled HBO for free to some of its higher end wireless customers. Verizon has invested in creating short-form video geared towards younger audiences and a mobile video service called Go90.The offer is for the T-Mobile ONE plan with 2+ lines. You can compare T-Mobile plans here.
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Like Netflix? T-Mobile Is Giving it Away For Free

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  • by MobyDisk ( 75490 ) on Wednesday September 06, 2017 @12:12PM (#55148109) Homepage

    The worst-case scenario of not having network neutrality is ISPs altering or blocking content. The second worst-case scenario is ISPs partnering with web sites and offering their content for free. Amazon and Hulu should compete on product, not on having special deals with local monopolies. Can you imagine the outcry if your local power company gave free power to Kitchenaid appliances but not Whirlpool appliances, or to the PlayStation 4 but not the XBox? That would be such a clear abuse of monopoly power that we would never stand for it. We need to stop this from happening on the internet.

    • And yet again, another example of how absolutely no-one understands what Net Neutrality is, nor what existing Net Neutrality laws even do.

      REAL Net Neutrality in no way would block deals such as these, nor should it. What you want is some kind of horrid dystopia.

      • by Jeremi ( 14640 )

        REAL Net Neutrality in no way would block deals such as these, nor should it.

        We've seen what happens when a product's viability is determined not by the quality of the product, but rather by what partnerships the company can strike with the gatekeepers. It's not pretty. How would the next streaming-video company compete if it has to require customers to pay for bandwidth while entrenched players like Netflix can give them for "free"?

        What you want is some kind of horrid dystopia.

        Hyperbole, eh? Is our current electric grid a horrid dystopia because the electric company is not allowed to give free unlimited power to people as l

        • How would the next streaming-video company compete if it has to require customers to pay for bandwidth while entrenched players like Netflix can give them for "free"?

          What you are effectively arguing is that no company may ever give away its product for free, because that would give it a competitive advantage over any new competition. Do you really wish to have that kind of legislative control over private contracts?

          Is our current electric grid a horrid dystopia because the electric company is not allowed to give free unlimited power to people as long as it is used on co-branded appliances? I don't think so.

          The difference is, T-Mobile is not a monopoly. Even the "electric company" can no longer be considered a monopoly, at least in places where you can buy your electricity from more than one company. I have a choice of four, if I recall correctly, electricity su

    • NFL ST (NFL verizon local games) CSN Philly (past) are the more locked in site of things.

    • I agree that it is NOT a good thing for consumers if we allow local monopolies to work out exclusivity agreements with other services or products, but T-Mobile is hardly a monopoly by any stretch of the imagination, local or otherwise. In about 99% of the places they are, so too are Verizon, AT&T, and Sprint.

      I'd be right there with you if this was Comcast or Cox or Suddenlink doing similarly, simply because of the way that they've all managed to carve out regional monopolies in which they're largely unc

      • by MobyDisk ( 75490 )

        I get your point, but T-Mobile is a monopoly. They have exclusive rights to certain frequencies, granted to them by the US government. But even if that were not the case, having 4 companies control wireless telephone system over the entire United States, and absurdly high barriers of entry, is enough to make them a monopoly IMHO.

        • having 4 companies control wireless telephone system over the entire United States, and absurdly high barriers of entry, is enough to make them a monopoly IMHO.

          I'll disagree with your take on this, and I mean this in the kindest of ways, but your use of "monopoly" makes me question whether you know what it means. Yes, they're huge, yes, they're dug in, and yes, I wish there was more competition, but, monopolies are defined by their exclusive (or near-exclusive) control over a market [investopedia.com], so none of those factors means these companies are monopolies. It just means that the market has high barriers to entry and that the current players are entrenched. If anything, the f

    • I'd be delighted at any discount my local utility offered. Free power for Kitchenaid appliances? FANTASTIC

      Who is being abused when someone offers a discount or benefit? You aren't abused because you have Whirlpool and not Kitchenaid, you just didn't get a freebie someone else got.

      T-Mobile offers free Netflix, FANTASTIC. Abuse me some more and offer me free Hulu next. Or go all out and offer me a free Tesla Model S. That would be some seriously outrageous abuse of T-Mobile customers.

      • by suutar ( 1860506 )

        Whirlpool is now facing a non-level playing field. This does not seem to meet the usual definitions of a free or fair market.

        • Whirlpool is now facing a non-level playing field.

          By that definition, there is never a "level playing field". Each provider of a service makes choices about price/quality/features, all of which attempt to tip the "playing field" in their own favor. The fact that Hershy chocolate is waxy and unappealing but costs a lot less than Lindt or Ghiardelli tips the playing field in favor ofHershy in some markets, the others in others.

          You are perhaps confusing equality of opportunity with equality of outcome -- a common mistake in today's politically correct, hyper

        • Holy Batman!

          Whirlpool has an uneven playing field because Kitchenaid struck a promotional deal with a local utility?

          You do realize companies do promotional deals with other companies ever single day? Ever wonder why McDonald's doesn't sell Coke and Pepsi?

          I don't know what kind of playing field you imagine the business world to be but I can assure you to isn't anything like you imagine.

    • Real net neutrality is a dumb pipe. It doesn't block or prohibit anything.

  • I called to cancel my subscription to the Wall Street Journal because I was rearranging my budget. Not only did I get an $8 per month discount for six months, I also got Amazon Prime for free.
  • "...the freebie only works if you have at least two T-Mobile One unlimited data plans..."

    Gee, I only have to spend an obscene amount of money per month on a cell plan in order to get this "freebie".

    Fuck common sense budgeting and financial planning...who needs that shit when you have millennial math and YOLO.

    • Fuck common sense budgeting and financial planning...who needs that shit when you have millennial math and YOLO.

      YEAH!!!! And another thing: these millennials are ALWAYS on my lawn! I tell them to quit it, and then, next thing you know, they're right back on there, with their hashtags and their YOLOs.

  • But it's not HBO NOW it's HBO GO/ HBO Main feed and you need to buy an basic tv package to get it.

  • It is built into the price. Just sue them if they don't offer the same plan without it at a cheaper price.

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