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Microsoft Social Networks

Microsoft Connects LinkedIn and Office 365 Via Profile Cards, Starting To Capitalize on $26B Deal (geekwire.com) 52

More than a year after Microsoft announced its plans to purchase LinkedIn for $26.2 billion, the technology giant is rolling out some of the first integrations with the business social network. From a report: At its Ignite conference in Orlando this morning, Microsoft plans to announce that Office 365 will include a new "profile card" that can display LinkedIn information. For example, interviewers using Outlook would be able to easily access LinkedIn profiles of job seekers. This integration, the first between Office 365 and LinkedIn since the acquisition, is designed to make it easier for people to search for others inside their organizations. Here's how it works, according to the company: "Users who have access to this feature can access LinkedIn profile information by hovering over a person's name and navigating to the 'LinkedIn' tab on the new profile card. Microsoft service administrators continue to have control over organizational privacy and connected features in their tenant. We respect end-user privacy and will honor your LinkedIn privacy and profile visibility settings."
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Microsoft Connects LinkedIn and Office 365 Via Profile Cards, Starting To Capitalize on $26B Deal

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    Now can I finally view Clippies LinkedIn profile within office? I need to know if he has the credentials to be my personal Office365 assistant.

  • by TheRaven64 ( 641858 ) on Monday September 25, 2017 @10:40AM (#55259759) Journal
    Microsoft is increasingly competing with Google apps, yet they consistently play to their weaknesses in doing so. The big selling point for Microsoft should be that you install the software on your own machines, your corporate data never leaves your building. If you want to have cloudy reliability, then you can install Windows Server on a bunch of machines and use HyperV to virtualise them. Instead, they push running stuff on the Azure infrastructure with no migration plan if you want to take it in house, storing data on their servers, Windows 10 telemetry, and integration with one of the Internet's most annoying spammers.
    • by c ( 8461 ) <beauregardcp@gmail.com> on Monday September 25, 2017 @10:49AM (#55259811)

      The big selling point for Microsoft should be that you install the software on your own machines, your corporate data never leaves your building.

      True, but if they don't do cloud then they don't have a chance in hell in the mobile space. No mobile solutions means not growth and effectively ceding that entire market to Google.

      Not that their mobile efforts have amounted to anything worthwhile so far, but I get the thought process behind it.

      Mind you, that still doesn't explain dropping $26B for LinkedIn....

    • by Anonymous Coward

      The decade of Ballmer was about fear of losing market dominance. i.e. always playing defense

      The decade of Nadella is about fear of losing relevance. i.e. always playing offense

      Never again will there be anything innovative or relevant about Microsoft. There's nothing left except resting on the recurring revenue they've locked entities into over the last 2 decades.

      That's why.

      • by Z00L00K ( 682162 )

        Right now it looks like Microsoft plays offense without knowing where they come from or where they are going, essentially playing offense with a blindfold on.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      You clearly have no idea what Microsoft is up to these days. For one thing, if you want to be part of the Partner program, you'd better have a strategy built around the cloud, or MS won't even talk to you.

      Look at their Azure and Office 365 growth figures--you call those a "weakness", but MS sees the traditional on-prem infrastructure as the weak area with limited growth potential. It's all cloud, cloud, cloud.

    • Microsoft IS playing to its strengths. It knows that its customer base is too stupid to switch to something better, and is therefore squeezing said customer base for more control and profit.

    • "Microsoft is increasingly competing with Google apps, yet they consistently play to their weaknesses in doing so." Excellent observation. I think the history of Microsoft has been that it has always been behind the curve. It has bought as a way of bridging that gap, and may be an excellent business school case study in that regard. However, as a technology company or innovator, Microsoft hasn't succeeded. I think that is what you are seeing as it continues to try to find an identity.
  • by QuietLagoon ( 813062 ) on Monday September 25, 2017 @11:02AM (#55259905)
    The data harvesting of Windows 10 contradicts the assertion by Microsoft that they respect end-user privacy.
  • As predictable as every other large purchase made by Microsoft, Linked in will be used to shill other MS products at the cost of core functionality clarity of mission. Finally, because it doesn't sell enough MS Office licences, it will be moved sideways into Bing as Bing Business, and then it will die a slow death because it doesn't also sell enough Teams licences.

  • My experience with LinkedIn is that people seem to use it to proclaim how gorgeous, smart, accomplished and well-connected they are. Since even an idiot like me can see that, the other LinkedIn inmates, far more clever and accomplished than me, can obviously see that. They will grasp, in a millisecond, that LinkedIn is mostly populated by poseurs like themselves. Do they buy the garbage that the other poseurs post?
    • by garcia ( 6573 )

      Yes.

      1. Aside from direct contacts from headhunters I have a previous relationship with, the best recruiters who come into contact with me do so via LinkedIn.

      2. The beginning process for me to land my current job happened entirely on LinkedIn.

      3. I use LinkedIn to vet resumes of candidates continuously. In fact, one candidate was over-inflating his position history on their resume while their public LinkedIn profile was not mirroring the same titles and experience for the same timeframes. Why would your publi

      • 3. I use LinkedIn to vet resumes of candidates continuously. In fact, one candidate was over-inflating his position history on their resume while their public LinkedIn profile was not mirroring the same titles and experience for the same timeframes. Why would your public-facing titles be less glamorous than your resume?

        Because it's visible to anyone without control or limit?

        I know for sure I pull a hell of a lot less on my public profile than I'd send on a real resume.

        • by garcia ( 6573 )

          In this case, the individual was saying they were a Sr Analyst on their LI profile and a Manager on their resume (this sort of level shifting was present across their entire job history).

          I find the disparity due to the public nature of LI forcing people to be more truthful than they would be on their resume.

      • what a laugh, garbage recruiters in India run automated systems that spam linkedin profilers with keywords. They even see help wanted ads and run campaigns to find people in the hopes they might then negotiate with the company actually offering the position though they have no relationship with them. Then there is even a level beyond that where the process reiterates for third and fourth hand "recruiting" of the the position the wanna-be recruiter has! I dropped Linkedin because of the immense volume o

  • before "respect end-user privacy" and "honor your LinkedIn privacy and profile visibility settings" applies only to Office365 subscribers. I suspect Microsoft will make non-subscribers pay for their LinkedIn service with reduced control over their profiles.

    • before "respect end-user privacy" and "honor your LinkedIn privacy and profile visibility settings" applies only to Office365 subscribers. I suspect Microsoft will make non-subscribers pay for their LinkedIn service with reduced control over their profiles.

      Why not? After getting most of the way though the signup process, and then LinkedIn asking for my email password in order to invite people to join, the answer for anyone with at least one active brain cell should have been Fuck NO!

      Anyone dumb enough to still join is pretty stupid, and half deserves what they get.

  • Does LinkedIn still want your email password so they can mine your contacts list in order to annoy the shit out of everyone you know?

    A most fitting partner for Microsoft.

  • LinkedIn had an Outlook plugin before the acquisition, and it sounds like all they can do is iterations on the plugin for Outlook. Microsoft wasted 26bn for something that they already had.
  • 15 mentions of Microsoft on the front page ..

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