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The Internet Government United States Politics

The FCC Is Still Tweaking Its Net Neutrality Repeal (techcrunch.com) 68

An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: You may think, from the pomp accompanying the FCC's vote in December to repeal the 2015 net neutrality rules, that the deed was accomplished. Not so -- in fact, the order hasn't even reached its final form: the Commission is still working on it. But while it may be frustrating, this is business as usual for regulations like this, and concerned advocates should conserve their outrage for when it's really needed. The "Restoring Internet Freedom" rule voted on last month was based on a final draft circulated several weeks before the meeting at which it would be adopted. But as reports at the time noted, significant edits (i.e. not fixing typos) were still going into the draft the day before the FCC voted. Additional citations, changes in wording and more serious adjustments may be underway. It may sound like some serious shenanigans are being pulled, but this is how the sausage was always made, and it's actually one of Chairman Ajit Pai's handful of commendable efforts that the process is, in some ways at least, more open to the public. The question of exactly what is being changed, however, we will have ample time to investigate: The rules will soon be entered into the federal register, at which point they both come into effect and come under intense scrutiny and legal opposition.
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The FCC Is Still Tweaking Its Net Neutrality Repeal

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  • and see whats in the federal register?
  • by ArtemaOne ( 1300025 ) on Wednesday January 03, 2018 @09:12AM (#55854769)

    it's actually one of Chairman Ajit Pai's handful of commendable efforts that the process is, in some ways at least, more open to the public

    It may have been open to the public, but there were massive numbers of fake responses posted condemning the hackjob "net neutrality" regulation. All this implementation did was create an opportunity to skew the perception of what the public wanted through a misinformation campaign. We still need real net neutrality in law, not a regulation that three people can overturn.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Half a million Russian email addresses were used citing legitimate US identities who were not the submitters of the comment. Chairman Pai refused to investigate even these, or help State Attorneys investigate the identity fraud for people in their state. Adjit has said he is not filtering identifiable fake comments and is considering the substance.

      What's the betting, he colluded with telcos to skew the submissions hiring Trump's foreign troll/hack friends?

      • Half a million Russian email addresses were used citing legitimate US identities who were not the submitters of the comment. Chairman Pai refused to investigate even these, or help State Attorneys investigate the identity fraud for people in their state. Adjit has said he is not filtering identifiable fake comments and is considering the substance.

        What's the betting, he colluded with telcos to skew the submissions hiring Trump's foreign troll/hack friends?

        Who would waste time investigating forged email addresses? I get spam constantly. I also own a domain and I get flooded with bounced emails using my domain as a return address. There's no point in wasting time on it

    • > We still need real net neutrality in law, not a regulation that three people can overturn

      I commend you for having the courage to say that here, to agree completely with exactly what chairman Pai has been saying.

      • Not exactly what he has been saying. I would be fine with the regulation staying in place until a law replaced it.

        • I would be fine with the regulation staying in place until a law replaced it.

          You have a 6" water pipe in your basement. It cracks. Water spews forth. It's a high priority thing to get fixed. You buy some of this FlexWrap tape, wrap the pipe, and the water leak stops. This is a temporary fix, but now that it is in place the priority of the real fix drops a couple of notches as you start dealing with other issues.

          That's what the FCC regulations are. They're a temporary fix that removes the impetus to have a long-term real solution.

          Look no further than continuing resolutions for ano

          • I understand the concept, and hope it works. I just don't give the do-nothings in congress a break for stuff like that, or letting bridges and levies degrade to the point of failure. Stuff like that isn't acceptable, but I hope the gamble pays off in this case.

      • what chairman Pai has been saying.

        Pai is a liar, so what he says means little. This is a case in point -- he says this like it's a good reason to get rid of NN rules, even though he could easily keep them in place until such legislation is passed.

        He doesn't give a shit about process or what's best for the American people. What he cares about is giving a huge gift to the major telecoms.

        • > even though he could illegally keep them in place

          FTFY

          • That's not "fixing it" so much as "breaking it" unless you have some sort of actual proof that the FCC acted illegally.

        • by Rob Y. ( 110975 )

          Plus, he and his defenders constantly argue that ISP's won't do any of the bad things that they will now be allowed to do - because 'the market' will prevent it. Well, if that's the case, then why change the regulations that prevent it?

          If there's something specific that they're willing to admit to wanting to do, present it to the FCC for approval. 'Trust us' is hardly a way to make policy - especially when you seem to be justifying the change by arguing that the status quo is just fine...

    • We still need real net neutrality in law, not a regulation that three people can overturn.

      I'm not sure there's as much advantage there as you might think. As I've mentioned before [slashdot.org], a law can be overturned by a similarly small handful of judges, and once overturned is the status quo for the foreseeable future. As it stands, the FCC commissioners' staggered terms effectively create a horizon of a few years before the pendulum could just as well swing back the other direction, just as it did here. That uncertainty itself is likely to keep businesses from making fundamental changes to their model

  • by GrumpySteen ( 1250194 ) on Wednesday January 03, 2018 @09:40AM (#55854861)

    Concerned advocates should conserve their outrage for when it's really needed.

    So... don't contact your congressional representatives now when your voice might stand out and be heard? Wait until the last minute flood so that your comments can be drowned out more easily by the anti-neutrality bot spam?

    I'm sure that'll work well for everyone.

    • We should all just STFU and let Trump and his cadre of profiteering cronies rape America back to the 1950's.
      • by zifn4b ( 1040588 )

        We should all just STFU and let Trump and his cadre of profiteering cronies rape America back to the 1950's.

        That's cute that you think Trump was the start of it all. The real beginning goes all the way back to the Reagan administration and it was a bi-partisan effort. Read the works of Chris Hedges for more information. Globalization was the ultimate slap in the face pushed forth by folks like the US Chamber of Commerce under the guise of progressivism. You bought it hook, line and sinker. We were promised cheaper goods AND better jobs. We got the cheaper goods but better jobs? Precisely the opposite. Bi-

      • 1920s , actually.

        The 1950s were a time when the middle class was relatively well off and wealth disparity had dropped sharply from it's height in the late 20s. Everything Trump and his cronies are doing is to benefit the 1% and increase that disparity by taking everything they can away from the rest of society.

    • by zifn4b ( 1040588 )

      So... don't contact your congressional representatives now when your voice might stand out and be heard? Wait until the last minute flood so that your comments can be drowned out more easily by the anti-neutrality bot spam?

      I'm sure that'll work well for everyone.

      You must be new here. Whining on slashdot is the most effective way to usher positive change into our government, duh! Because government officials are avid readers of slashdot.

  • by squiggleslash ( 241428 ) on Wednesday January 03, 2018 @09:40AM (#55854865) Homepage Journal

    It's visible to the public, not "open". If it were open, we'd have some say in it (which means it wouldn't be happening.)

    • by zifn4b ( 1040588 )

      It's visible to the public, not "open". If it were open, we'd have some say in it (which means it wouldn't be happening.)

      Oh gee, you need the truth spoon fed to you instead of seeking it out yourself? You do realize that's precisely what the propaganda pushers expect and use as the means to distort the truth right?

  • by Anonymous Coward
    You should hold off – and see what happens after the elections in November. That's the new normal according to Mitch McConnell and Paul Ryan.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    Did I understand correctly that they actually voted to agree with something which can still thoroughly change? That's the equivalent of having someone sign a check and filling in the amount due after the fact.

    • A better analogy is probably that it's like they decide to go to the hobby shop, then they get on Google maps to find the exact route to take.

      They decided they don't have the legal authority to enforce the 2015 regulations, then studied what they *can* legally do and decided on a general approach. Now they are finishing up the details of what their regulations will be under the current law, while awaiting Congress passing a NN law (or not).

  • by ledow ( 319597 )

    "The rules will soon be entered into the federal register, at which point they both come into effect and come under intense scrutiny and legal opposition."

    Bit late to do anything about them if they are already in effect at that point.

    I think that's the entire point of the protests.

  • Ignorance is strength. Ajit Pai is an impartial regulator. Welcome to the new Administration.
  • Dear Slashdot,

    On this article, you only needed to keep the first five words of the headline. The remaining words do not add any clarity.

    Just sayin'

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