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Microsoft Businesses Software

Microsoft Office 2019 Will Only Work on Windows 10 (theverge.com) 303

Microsoft on Thursday provided an update on Office 2019, in which it revealed that the apps will only run on Windows 10. From a report: In a support article for service and support of Windows and Office, Microsoft has revealed you'll need to upgrade to Windows 10 if you want the latest version of Office without subscribing to the company's Office 365 service. It's a move that's clearly designed to push businesses that are holding off on Office 365 into subscriptions, as the standalone Office 2019 software will only be supported on Windows 10 and not Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 machines. Microsoft is also altering the support lifecycle for Office 2019, so it will receive 5 years of mainstream support and then "approximately 2 years of extended support."
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Microsoft Office 2019 Will Only Work on Windows 10

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  • Eat My Ass (Score:5, Funny)

    by sexconker ( 1179573 ) on Thursday February 01, 2018 @03:44PM (#56049359)

    Eat my ass, MS. I'm not running Windows 10, and you can't make me!

    • Re:Eat My Ass (Score:5, Insightful)

      by jellomizer ( 103300 ) on Thursday February 01, 2018 @04:17PM (#56049683)

      Well I guess you may be able to take a few days to get Wine setup to handle it.

      However that is what my experience is.
      The Boss gets a document to you and it is slightly screwed up (off fonts, or spacing) they Demand that they send it in that format. You open the file and save it and it goes off again.
      Then they find out that you are not Using the newest version of office. So you have an option, upgrade to Office, or downgrade your job.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by blindseer ( 891256 )

        If I have a boss that demands I use the latest version of Microsoft Office for producing documents, and does not provide that to me on the company provided computer, then I believe you've created a false dichotomy with "upgrade to Office, or downgrade your job". Most any job would be an upgrade from that.

        My work experience has been primarily in educational institutions and large technology centered corporations. In both settings there was a strong leaning on Microsoft technologies, and also a strong tende

  • By showing a "better" (ahem) OS, then kill it off by writing your "best" (cough) software to only run on your newest OS.

    Been that way for decades from MS. Nothing new.

    • by Wrath0fb0b ( 302444 ) on Thursday February 01, 2018 @04:12PM (#56049633)

      Yeah, there's definitely no legitimate reason that an upcoming project would decide to deprecate support for an OS that will be 10 years old at the point of release (Win7 came out in '09). Supporting and doing quality assurance on multiple OS targets is totally free from an engineering and testing standpoint. All API features from newer OSes are backported to decades-old ones.

      Note that LibreOffice dropped support for OSX 10.8 (2012) and required various Linux components (Kernel/GTK) from 2006.

      Removing support for old stuff at the right time is part of the software flow. Supporting the everything-on-everything model means less resources (both development and testing) for other stuff. Surely there's a "too soon" for deprecation" but also a "too late". One decade sounds pretty dang reasonable.

      • by jwhyche ( 6192 ) on Thursday February 01, 2018 @04:21PM (#56049723) Homepage

        h, there's definitely no legitimate reason that an upcoming project would decide to deprecate support for an OS that will be 10 years old

        You really need to stop being a voice of reason around here. I mean we can't have these great hate microsoft bashing threads if you keep using your common sense.

        Geezz. get with the program.

        • by bluefoxlucid ( 723572 ) on Thursday February 01, 2018 @04:53PM (#56050019) Homepage Journal

          You really need to stop being a voice of reason around here.

          Somebody has to. You should see my political campaign. I got in an argument with some guy who keeps telling me capitalism is past its end and it's time we moved on; he was very angry when I pointed out that the CEO of Home Depot taking lower pay and fewer bonuses wouldn't "pay for higher wages and benefits" because Home Depot has 300,000 employees and the entire executive suite nets $28/year per employee in cash compensation between them. His argument was I'm wrong because "their wealth is built on the backs of mistreated employees" (notice this ignores the numerical analyses).

          Even when you ditch the socialists, that's the voice of today's progressive left movement: make the rich pay, make the businesses pay, make everybody with power pay, make Wall Street pay. I can agree with regulation about banks and such; and I'm interested in something today's progressives aren't talking about: strategies to bring the poor out of poverty and provide more economic fairness to the middle-class.

          It makes people angry. It's like the progressive left don't really care about the poor, only about the rich. Somebody's got to say it.

          • by jwhyche ( 6192 )

            It makes people angry. It's like the progressive left don't really care about the poor, only about the rich. Somebody's got to say it

            Sounds like the two of us have been to the same schools. I don't mind if someone wants to bitch and moan about something. I'm cool with that but at least have some ideal about what you are bitch'n about. Use your brain and don't just take the talking points from Foxnews or CNN as gospel. Yeah I like to honk off the alt left and the alt right.

            Like the current arguments on the daca program. OMG, Trump is going to kick 800,000 people out of the country! Except that isn't what is happening. All he di

            • by jwhyche ( 6192 )

              You can also see the effects of the "progressive" left here on slashdot. Anything that doesn't fit the status quo of "trump bad" gets modded down.

        • Geezz. get with the program.

          Eh... smells like a Microsoft sockpuppet.

          • by jwhyche ( 6192 )

            Eh... smells like a Microsoft sockpuppet.

            An you smell like the typical computer bigot doesn't have a clue what they are talking about. I remember the Amiga religious wars so I know what one sounds like. You think the sun shines out a penguins ass and open source is the best thing since sex and blow.

            Well it isn't. Both windows and linux have their strengths and weaknesses. There are place where one belongs and the other doesn't. An that is a fact.

            Attitudes like yours are not the answer to everything. In fact its this kind of crap that i

        • oh come on. 7 is still in very wide usage. They aren't doing this for technical reasons, it's purely because they want to foist windows 10 on their users.

          • by jwhyche ( 6192 )

            Well they do but people are acting like you have no choice in the matter. Nobody is forcing people to upgrade to windows 10 or even office 2019. There are plenty of choices out there you have to just decide which one you want to do. Nobody is holding a gun to anyone's head.

            Yes windows 7 is in wide usage right now and its 10 years old. At the end of its life. An before someone chimes in that its still usable I would like to point out so is Centos 5 which is also EOL and no longer supported.

      • Well this goes for Windows 8.1 but everyone hates that one so we won't mention it.
      • Supporting and doing quality assurance on multiple OS targets is totally free from an engineering and testing standpoint.

        ... except for the fact that Office 365 subscribers will be able to run Office 2019 on Win7. Since MSFT is already doing that engineering work for Office 365 this comes down to nothing more than an artificial limitation; intended to herd their customers in the direction that MSFT wants them to go.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Declaring Windows 7 "Unsupported" is one thing. Deliberately disabling the new software is another.

      • by SeaFox ( 739806 )

        Removing support for old stuff at the right time is part of the software flow. Supporting the everything-on-everything model means less resources (both development and testing) for other stuff. Surely there's a "too soon" for deprecation" but also a "too late". One decade sounds pretty dang reasonable.

        Isn't the software supposed to be to fulfill a specific purpose for the customer.
        We're talking about a business application suite, with a user base that a large portion of which are still using Windows 7 for various reasons, and Windows 7 is still under support until 2020.

        What are the differences between standalone Office and online subscription that necessitate this higher Windows version?
        This smells of nothing more than Microsoft trying to punish businesses for not moving to Windows 10.

      • If the fucking OS is still supported why wouldn't Installing the latest damn office suite still be available.

        Support ends:

        Win 7 - Jan. 14 2020
        Win 8/8.1 - Jan. 10 2023
        Server 2012R2 - Oct. 10 2023

        Especially for Windows 8 machines, why the hell should they be forced to run older and likely not updated ( or updated as fast ) versions of office when the OS itself is supported for 4 years yet when office 2019 comes out?

        Note that LibreOffice dropped support for OSX 10.8 (2012) and required various Linux components (Kernel/GTK) from 2006.

        I wasn't aware that LibreOffice was a large corporation that prided itself on backwards compa

        • If the fucking OS is still supported why wouldn't Installing the latest damn office suite still be available.

          Support ends:

          Win 7 - Jan. 14 2020
          Win 8/8.1 - Jan. 10 2023
          Server 2012R2 - Oct. 10 2023

          Especially for Windows 8 machines, why the hell should they be forced to run older and likely not updated ( or updated as fast ) versions of office when the OS itself is supported for 4 years yet when office 2019 comes out?

          Note that LibreOffice dropped support for OSX 10.8 (2012) and required various Linux components (Kernel/GTK) from 2006.

          I wasn't aware that LibreOffice was a large corporation that prided itself on backwards compatibility and being the default go to for an office suite. Here I thought it was a mostly volunteer Open Source effort that didn't have gobs of money to throw at people to keep maximum compatibility with different versions of operating systems.

          By comparison when Office 2010 was released, XP (which was still dominant on business desktop, just like 7 is now) was supported, even though it was in extended support that lasted till 2014.

          Office 2013 only supported 7 and newer, even though Vista was in extended support till 2017. Office 2016 likewise only supported 7 or newer.

    • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

      A far more obvious and likely explanation is that they are simply reducing their costs by not supporting older versions of Windows. It costs money to develop for and test for those older versions, and to keep supporting them.

      Most users never upgrade their version of Office. It comes with the PC, that's it. Businesses and home users alike. MS don't sell Windows 7 or 8.1 any more, so it will likely have near zero impact on their Office sales and save them a load of money.

  • by BrendaEM ( 871664 ) on Thursday February 01, 2018 @03:46PM (#56049377) Homepage
    LibreOffice includes a word processor, spreadsheet, presentation, and a database.
    It's free!
    https://www.libreoffice.org/
  • by sqorbit ( 3387991 ) on Thursday February 01, 2018 @03:46PM (#56049381)
    As a self employed contractor software subscriptions are killing my business. Adobe has forced me into a subscription model where I'm paying 50$ a month to use their software, Microsoft is pretty much forcing the subscription model of Office 365 on me. Will Microsoft have Windows on a subscription model soon? My monthly fees are going to pile up it's going to make the decision to seek open source alternatives and simple choice.
    • by BenFranske ( 646563 ) on Thursday February 01, 2018 @03:58PM (#56049505) Homepage

      Will Microsoft have Windows on a subscription model soon?

      They already do for bigger businesses, it's called "software assurance". Believe you me, if/when they could figure out how to force smaller business users into subscription Windows they will. There's a reason that the commercial software publishers (Adobe, Autodesk, etc.) are all going subscription based, hint, it's not because it's better for consumers. It's because it's much more lucrative for them. These people are in business to make money, which means taking yours. They've just gotten better at it.

      • There's a reason that the commercial software publishers (Adobe, Autodesk, etc.) are all going subscription based, hint, it's not because it's better for consumers. It's because it's much more lucrative for them

        It may or may not be more lucrative. What driving the subscription model is predictability. It's the accounting department which is pushing these companies to adopt the subscription model. Their job is a lot easier if they know they have x subscribers paying $y per year, and they can model how muc

        • by Bert64 ( 520050 )

          The model of selling software has a limited shelf life and the publishers all know this... There are very few compelling new features, previous versions do the job perfectly well and a lot of users want to stay with older versions. Newer versions introduce features users don't want, while also being more bloated and slower.

          If users are subscribing to a service, then the vendors can stop new development almost entirely, and just perform occasional bugfixes. They would save a lot of money if they fired 90% of

    • Not trolling, but if $60/month ($50 for Adobe and $10 for Office365)* is "killing" your business, perhaps you need to rethink your business? You should recover that cost in less than an hour of billable work. Sure, it's important to keep all overhead costs down, but for most businesses these would be small time costs.

      *Cost is based on 1 user, which is a reasonable assumption given that you are a "a self employed contractor".

      • Adobe, MS... they have nothing on AutoDesk at $300/month.

        It adds up quickly when you can’t stretch software lives. Thankfully I have a $15k package that is perpetual... and 10 years old.

        We pay about $1,000/year per person for software; it starts to get tough.

        • by Zak3056 ( 69287 )

          Adobe is actually not too bad, at least for Acrobat--We don't buy Acrobat anymore, preferring to do subscriptions as the break even is three years and we try to keep Acrobat within one version of current. For us, this was a wash either way, and the subs are more flexible than the fixed licenses were.

          Microsoft is middle of the road. O365 is always going to cost more, software-wise, than perpetual office, and given that we're on a 6-7 year upgrade cycle for Office, this is a pretty serious increase in cost.

      • A contractor doesn't get paid on a nice timely basis. They may get paid Quarterly or after the project is completed. While they are working on the project they will need to function off of what they have saved up. Then they get a big payday, and save a big portion so they can survive their next project.
        A monthly fee is a slow leak during the pay times, If one could outright purchase the full product, then they can buy it right after the big pay day, and be able to have a slower leak in their finances, or

    • Adobe has forced me into a subscription model where I'm paying 50$ a month to use their software

      Sounds like you already had a perpetual copy of something from Adobe - Photoshop I guess. So what was wrong with just continuing with it? Have they invented some new colours or something?

      Will Microsoft have Windows on a subscription model soon?

      Yes.

    • My monthly fees are going to pile up it's going to make the decision to seek open source alternatives and simple choice.

      The longer you wait, the more painful the transition. Get off the fence and start now, while you still have a business.

    • Monthly fees really do add up and hurt a business. Even if you are Paying more for one time cost version you have the option of using a bit longer then expected, budget an upgrade, reinvest the money you are paying for subscriptions.

      As a contractor you may not get paid every month, why are you forcing all your expenses to be monthly.

    • by jwhyche ( 6192 )

      As a self employed contractor software subscriptions are killing my business

      I don't know about the subscription model adobe is forcing you into. I have found there are plenty of cheaper alternatives to their expensive software.

      As for the Microsoft subscription module I've seen that is actually cheaper to pony up for a year in advance than to go month to month. $69 for a personal office license for 1 cpu, phone, and tablet. An $99 for 5 cpu, phones and tablets. The subscription module is still cheaper than just buying the office package off the shelf.

      You are writing all the

      • As for the Microsoft subscription module I've seen that is actually cheaper to pony up for a year in advance than to go month to month. $69 for a personal office license for 1 cpu, phone, and tablet. An $99 for 5 cpu, phones and tablets. The subscription module is still cheaper than just buying the office package off the shelf.

        $69 for a terabyte of cloud storage AND $30/month Skype credits is actually pretty good...

        • by jwhyche ( 6192 )

          It really isn't a bad deal. A terabyte of dropbox runs me $99 bucks a year. Dropbox is more compatible across devices but if I'm just using onedrive for backups of my personal desktop its hard to beat. The thing I really don't use is the skype credits but its nice to know they are there if I need them.

          I really never understood the raw hatred people have here for the office subscription package. It's reasonably priced, and cheaper than buying the full package in the store. Plus subscription plans hav

          • I really never understood the raw hatred people have here for the office subscription package.

            I do. Software is a tool. It's also information. I can buy information and I can buy tools.

            Let's consider software as information. If I buy information in the form of a book, newspaper, magazine, or etchings in a stone tablet, then I own that information. Copyright law might at least stipulate I own that copy of the information. This same information might need updating periodically but if I'm satisfied with the old information then I can keep it on a shelf or in a drawer and refer to it as I wish. I

      • I don't know about the subscription model adobe is forcing you into. I have found there are plenty of cheaper alternatives to their expensive software.

        There is no great alternative to Photoshop or InDesign. There are some buggy, crashy OSS alternatives with inferior UI, but that's it.

    • by Jahoda ( 2715225 )
      As a self employed contractor software subscriptions are killing my business.

      The Cost of Office 365 small business is $12.50/month. That includes Exchange, Office, Skype, OneDrive. The cost for Office 365 on its own is ~$8.75/month.

      No one is preventing you from purchasing Office outright, but the simple fact is that if you cannot afford $12.50 per employee/month for them to have email connectivity and an office suite, then you need to rethink your business planning. May I ask what you do a
    • It's about break-even when you consider a full lump-n-dump of the full suite every so many years vs monthly where you always get the latest edition.

      It's a win-win for both businesses that rely on the software and Microsoft as there's a fixed cost that can be budgeted each year. It's consistency vs unknown expenditures. Businesses prefer the former.

    • I hate to argue with somebody who is actually doing something when I'm not (I work for a company that provides all of the tools we need). But the cost of office subscriptions is *much* cheaper than the purchase prices in the past. Office used to run around $100 for the purchase. And then upgrades every other year were in the $60 range for an average of $80/year. Now a subscription is $60/year! So unless you were going to stay on old versions, the subscription model is price competitive.
    • As a self employed contractor software subscriptions are killing my business. Adobe has forced me into a subscription model where I'm paying 50$ a month to use their software, Microsoft is pretty much forcing the subscription model of Office 365 on me. Will Microsoft have Windows on a subscription model soon? My monthly fees are going to pile up it's going to make the decision to seek open source alternatives and simple choice.

      Not sure what all you're using from Adobe. I myself have resisted the move to th

  • Total BS (Score:5, Insightful)

    by omfglearntoplay ( 1163771 ) on Thursday February 01, 2018 @03:47PM (#56049383)

    I can't imagine business standing for this. I'm sure many would run Office 2016 for 10 years if they had to.

    • It's not like Office 2019 is going to have any useful new features. It'll probably be slower than Office 2016 also.

  • Windows 7 reaches of end of life in 2020.
    • To that end, my main windows machine is 8.1; good until 2023... even more time to wrangle some good alternatives.
    • by Merk42 ( 1906718 )
      As that time approaches I await another wave of "No one (else) will upgrade to Windows ${latest}, they'll switch to Linux, you'll see!", just like in 2014 when XP went EOL, and there was no huge uptick in desktop Linux.
      • ...just like in 2014 when XP went EOL, and there was no huge uptick in desktop Linux.

        I agree. That just proved the Einstein quote to be correct.

  • Part what's been killing Windows for decades is the bloat after bloat of compatibility layers that make it work with software all the way back to Windows 3.1 in some cases.

    • Except that Office 2019 will work with earlier Windows versions, IF users are railroaded into the subscription model. It's not a technical limitation but an artificial one.
  • FU (again) Microsoft (Score:5, Interesting)

    by krray ( 605395 ) on Thursday February 01, 2018 @03:49PM (#56049415)

    I have to run Windows. It was my choice -- accounting software. It is really the ONLY reason Windows is in the office anymore...

    Sadly Word / Excel work better on Windows IMHO; too many keyboard shortcuts missing in Office for Mac...

    I hate ribbons too. Won't use them.

    So I prefer Office XP which runs just fine on Windows 7 which run just fine virtualized running as a process on a Mac server.

    Windows has no business talking to the Internet (so it can't) which removes a whole bunch of security issues. I can run like this indefinitely. So ... fuck you Microsoft.

    • by DogDude ( 805747 )
      You're saying "fuck you" to a company that made the software that you've been happily running for almost 20 years now? That's a really strange attitude to have. I'm pretty happy that Office runs so well that you can use the same code for decades. I don't have much other software from other manufacturers that works as well and as long as some Microsoft stuff does.
  • plus or minus a year... or two...
  • by Major_Disorder ( 5019363 ) on Thursday February 01, 2018 @03:51PM (#56049443)
    If you ever wanted a road map to alienate all your customers Microsoft has provided it.
    Personally, I gave up on them years ago, but if they keep going the way they have been, they will start driving mainstream users away. Is it any wonder the home PC market is nearly dead already.
  • Why is the conclusion: "It's a move that's clearly designed to push businesses that are holding off on Office 365 into subscriptions"? They can upgrade to Windows 10 and get Office 2019. (Or do nothing, or migrate to some other platform/software, etc.) Microsoft has clearly done everything they can to push users to Windows 10 (automatic updates, anyone?), so why is that not considered? They seem hellbent on making Windows 10 "the most popular Windows ever".

  • I use Office only only rarely, but would like to ask to heavier users... I remember 2K as being a clear improvement over 97. Then you got 2003 that was similar to 2000 so no reason to upgrade. Then 2007 that had the dreaded ribbon and was file-incompatible so you more or less had to upgrade to open the incompatible files every moron that just couldn't be in a release that wasn't the last one sent you. Then 2010?, perhaps, 2013, I'm pretty sure that exists, probably others, then 365, one release to end all r

    • by vux984 ( 928602 )

      Yeah; outlook 2016 is a big improvement over older versions... even 2013. And its an order of magnitude better than 2000. Its a lot more reliable. Its solid. And honestly it doesn't have much competition. Thunderbird is good... but IMAP is really limited compared to exchange/office365.

      So for a lot of people the business case for office is simply exchange support. And for them Word and excel and powerpoint are really just along for the ride.

      Beyond outlook/exchange, 64-bit support lets you deal with much bigg

    • There are a few features I love as a business user:

      1. 1) Multi-user editing. When stored on certain kinds of storage (notably, sharepoint), it is possible for two different people to open one document simultaneously for editing and to see the changes the other person is making.
      2. 2) Change Tracking, When turned on, anything I type is hilighted with "my" color and is tagged with my name. The original author can then review everyone's changes and either "approve" or "reject" them.
      3. 3) Hidden text lets me get rid o
    • by jwhyche ( 6192 )

      So the question to power users is: Has been any reason, i mean feature-wise, to upgrade Office since Office 2000 ?

      If you are going to upgrade look at going to office 365, or 2016 if you don't want to go subscriptions. If you have office 2010, moving to 2013/2016 will get you some new feature but nothing really worth upgrading to in my option. The only reason I moved from 2013 to 2016 is because i subscribed to office 365, which is office 2016. But I used office 2013 at work and on my surface and I really don't notice much difference between it and 2016. If you have 2013 you are perfectly fine to stay there.

  • I'm still using Office 2013 and my wife is using 2010 and they both work just fine. In fact the newer versions (such as 2016 we use at work) have more bloated crap glued to the already cluttered interface. Is there anything in these newer versions that makes for a compelling reason to update?
    • by Kenja ( 541830 )
      Because at some point, you will be given an Office 2019 file, and you're version will barf all over it. Or you can switch to Open Office or something...
      • by jwhyche ( 6192 )

        Because at some point, you will be given an Office 2019 file,

        Which probably won't happen. I routinely work with 3 office versions, 2010, 2013, and 2016 and I have yet to see any compatibility versions between the 3 of them as for opening files. Granted, I don't use any really 2016 specific options.

        As for the OP bitch, this will happen with any software. Even libreoffice eventually. At some point a new feature will be added to the suite that isn't compatible with older versions. So the OP point is pretty much a moot point.

        An a interesting note I found a dir

      • by DogDude ( 805747 )
        Because at some point, you will be given an Office 2019 file, and you're version will barf all over it.

        Not likely. Microsoft provides all kinds of free converters. We can open modern documents in Office 2003, in fact.
  • ...Just kidding. You know they're only doing that to keep gov offices from switching to Linux and make those idiotic enough to switch back to Windows to have to upgrade. LibreOffice is your friend.
  • Will it work on Windows 11? I hear it's 1 louder.
  • Fine by me (Score:4, Interesting)

    by DogDude ( 805747 ) on Thursday February 01, 2018 @04:10PM (#56049615)
    That's fine by me. We're still using Office 2003. Works fine.
  • I use rather advanced features in Microsoft Word (and sometimes Excel), and Word 2007 is still perfectly suitable for all the publications I produce.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    If only people contributed to LibreOffice and Linux instead of giving billions to Microsoft you wouldn't be In the Windows 10 Monoculture. You have two years before Windows 7 expires, use that to plan your escape route.

  • so 2019 365 will work in windows or will be some like 2016 SP X fully works with 2019 (that is 365 only)

  • LibreOffice runs on all the operating systems I use. Even the OS's I choose to use because Windows 10's aggressive data harvesting is chasing me away from Windows.
  • by jediborg ( 4808835 ) on Thursday February 01, 2018 @05:13PM (#56050177)
    From my cold dead hands
  • by kenh ( 9056 )

    Windows 10 was released mid-2015, office 2019 will ship almost 4 years later, and of course Office 2016 and Office 2013 as well as Office 2010 will all work on several well-deprecated OSes when Office 2019 is released.

    I am certain that Apple's latest version of Pages, iMovie, etc. all run perfectly fine and are supported on 4 year-old OS X releases... right?

    Will the latest OS X even install on a 4 year-old Mac?

  • ... using the same old install CD on 9 computers.

    All of the shit, Excel, Access, Word, Power Point, and Outlook work just great on XP, 7, 8.1 and 10.

  • Scumbags.

    Of course there's open-source alternatives like Libre Office and Open Office, aren't there?

    Also, I'll bet cash money that someone comes up with a hack or some sort of 'shim' or 'wrapper' that will allow it to install under Windows 7/8/8.1.
  • I need my data, my spreadsheets and documents. I don't want them held ransom or have access cut off to them because ever-reliable Microsoft botches something.

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