Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Android Chrome Google Operating Systems Software Technology

Chrome OS Is Almost Ready To Replace Android On Tablets (theverge.com) 61

Several news features rolling out to Chromebooks paint a picture of the future of Chrome OS as the rightful replacement for Android tablet software. Those include a new split-screen feature for multitasking while in tablet mode, and a screenshot feature borrowed from Android. The Verge reports: As it stands now, Chrome OS is very close to taking up the mantle there, and features like this push it ever closer to becoming the hybrid OS for all types of Google-powered screens. This has been in the works for quite a while as Google's Chrome and Android teams have coordinated closely to ensure the influx of low-cost, hybrid computing devices like 2-in-1 Chromebooks get the best of both worlds. There is, of course, Android app compatibility on Chrome OS, an initiative that first arrived somewhat half-baked last year and has taken months to fully jell as Google worked out the kinks. For instance, just last month Google added the ability for Android apps on Chromebooks run in the background. In July of last year, Google also began embarking on a touch-focused redesign of Chrome OS to make the software more functional in tablet mode. We're likely not getting the full-blown merging of the two divisions and their respective platforms anytime soon, or perhaps ever, as Google has played with the idea for years without ever seeming to decide that one platform should supersede the other. In essence, however, Android remains Google's dominant mobile OS, while Chrome OS has been taking on more responsibility as Chromebooks have steadily become more capable and tablet-like.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Chrome OS Is Almost Ready To Replace Android On Tablets

Comments Filter:
  • >Chrome OS Is Almost Ready To Replace Android On Tablets

    Linux is Almost Ready to Replace Linux On Tablets.

    There, fixed that for you.

    • Re: (Score:2, Redundant)

      Electric signals are almost ready to replace electric signals in tablets

      Stupid reductionism is stupid. I cannot just run any Linux software on a tablet (e.g. GIMP). Being based on linux is no more interesting than being based on electricity.

      See also, OSX != BSD

      • by Jane Q. Public ( 1010737 ) on Saturday February 03, 2018 @01:01AM (#56060677)

        I cannot just run any Linux software on a tablet (e.g. GIMP). Being based on linux is no more interesting than being based on electricity.

        Sure you can.

        There are various apps you can use (I use one called "Linux Deploy") that let you run a full Linux install in a "VM"-type arrangement on your Android tablet.

        I can install a full Linux setup with a KDE or Ubuntu desktop, and get near-native performance. And run it either full-screen, or in an Android-type window.

        You would need a big SD card if you're going to install a lot of apps, but big SD cards are available.

        • Wow, a virtual machine! Tell me more!

          Look, I'm not trying to dis Android. I'm just saying that it being based on Linux doesn't make it equivalent to Chrome OS, any more than OSX is equivalent to BSD or the ability to run Windows 95 in the browser of your Android device makes it a Windows machine.

          • One one hand I agree: it's Linux, but it's definitely not GNU/Linux. And in the cases of Android and ChromeOS, this distinction is quite meaningful. On the other hand, every time Android or ChromeOS gets official driver support for another mobile or tablet device, that means you've got full support for the Linux kernel, and can in principle run any other Linux-based OS on it as well. In that sense, it is actually relevant.
            • Oh, I'm totally willing to say that Android and ChromeOS are good for the Linux ecosystem. You're quite right that it drives drivers (probably the most important aspect.). But that's not the topic of this thread. I was originally responding to someone who said "Android and ChromeOS are both Linux, therefore interchangable"

              I'm imagining my next surfing/email/slashdot computer will be a Chromebook with a "real" distro on it. They seem to be driving the price down on those platforms pretty nicely.

              • Using chroot, you can essentially install a VM on your Android device.

                Yes, REAL, full-blown Linux. I keep having to repeat that when I tell them about this, because they tend to disbelieve.

                For one way to do it, check out this [eachus.net].
        • If you would like more information about how to do this, go here. [eachus.net]
      • >I cannot just run any Linux software on a tablet

        I got up a bash shell on an android tablet. I could ls and cd and pwd and cat and echo. That's enough userspace to be going on with.

    • by serviscope_minor ( 664417 ) on Saturday February 03, 2018 @04:21AM (#56061039) Journal

      Linux is Almost Ready to Replace Linux On Tablets.

      And this is why people really hate RMS: because the bastard is far too often right.

      He warned about this decades ago with the whole GNU/Linux thing and lots of people pokled fun and/or claimed he was trying to take credit. He always said it was to abvoid PRECISELY this kind of confusion.

  • I hope they proceed to using this on phones so I can install Crouton on my phone and have a regular Linux desktop user experience there if I want.
    • Try Linux Deploy [google.com] (or if you don't trust Google, go to the github [github.com].) You do have the problem of having to connect to it via VNC still AFAIK, since last I looked all the Android X servers were garbage. But if you know one that works, I'm interested.

    • They've had systems, albeit imperfect, to install Debian or Ubuntu on Android phones pretty much since the 2.x days (maybe earlier.) I believe almost all require root. Here's one of the most popular [google.com], although I believe it's not being updated any more.

      Ubuntu at one point had an official Android/Ubuntu hybrid project, which I think was used as the core of the Motorola Atrix, the one phone that you could dock and turn into a full desktop (or it might have been Ubuntu for Android was based on the Atrix syste

    • You must have had a better experience with Crouton than I did. I've been using it on a laptop that saw roughly 6 hours of use per week, but in the end, it required manual intervention a little bit too often to keep running correctly - largely due to ChromeOS updates breaking things, but Google arguably can't be faulted for breaking an unsupported 3rd party hack by trying to take their ChromeOS product in a given direction.

      Anyhow, I eventually got rid of the thing and bought a wintel laptop (on which I did a

  • there is nothing to split.

  • by thomst ( 1640045 ) on Friday February 02, 2018 @06:39PM (#56059199) Homepage

    The headline claims "Chrome OS Is Almost Ready To Replace Android On Tablets," while TFS (which is itself apparently a quote of The Verge's story) says, "In essence, however, Android remains Google's dominant mobile OS, while Chrome OS has been taking on more responsibility as Chromebooks have steadily become more capable and tablet-like."

    So the story contradicts the headline, which means the headline is pure ...

    ... clickbait.

  • by eclectro ( 227083 ) on Friday February 02, 2018 @07:06PM (#56059343)

    So they are using the Linux Kernel, but yet their license looks nothing like the GNU license? [google.com]

    If I wanted to be locked-in with an OS and other services, I'd buy Apple products. They do a much better job it seems and are not a search company trying to get all my data so they can mine personal information about me then sell it.

    • So they are using the Linux Kernel, but yet their license looks nothing like the GNU license?

      That comment makes me wonder if you understand how software licensing works at all. They are following all the rules that allow them to make use of the GPL. How is that "bastardizing" GNU? It's exactly the opposite of that actually.

      If I wanted to be locked-in with an OS and other services, I'd buy Apple products.

      What does that it even mean? Locked into an OS? You're locked in to ChromeOS just as much as you are if you start learning and accumulating software for any OS.

      I'd buy Apple products

      Based on your rantings (trolling) I'd have to assume you are pro-OSS. Most of ChromeOS is open source. Go download the M

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Go download the MacOS kernel.

        For your convenience, here's a link to browse the source online. [apple.com]

        (To be clear, I'm being facetious here; your point is that most of Apple's software isn't free-as-in-freedom, you just chose a bad example).

    • by short ( 66530 )
      So why is Apple blocking the Free WebM format? How to play Free videos on iPhone? That is probably the last reason why YouTube still have to provide also the mp4/H.264/5 crap variant for all their videos.
      • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

        So why is Apple blocking the Free WebM format? How to play Free videos on iPhone? That is probably the last reason why YouTube still have to provide also the mp4/H.264/5 crap variant for all their videos.

        WebM isn't free. Google has admitted to it and is paying the license fees for the patents it uses. That's why Google is preferring people use h.264 instead It's also why all the big players have stopped bothering with it - if they're going to pay h.264 license fees for something that is worse than h.264, t

  • Screenshot! (Score:5, Funny)

    by farble1670 ( 803356 ) on Friday February 02, 2018 @08:04PM (#56059667)

    and a screenshot feature borrowed from Android

    OMFG the screenshot feature is ready? Ship it!

  • .. Not thanks.. It's an internet meme how fast Google creates new products then abandons them, or creates several competing products in the same space and then abandons all but one of them. The last 2 years this has accelerated and it's hard to trust them for anything medium term and commit to them.
  • by jareth-0205 ( 525594 ) on Saturday February 03, 2018 @05:33AM (#56061153) Homepage

    Having got a Pixelbook to replace my Pixel C, I think this will probably happen. Android has never been ideal on a tablet mostly because the apps haven't taken full advantage of the space. Also the larger screen leads to more web-use, and Android Chrome is quite limiting compared to the desktop version.

    Android apps on ChromeOS fill in the most obvious deficiencies of ChromeOS, ie the lack of decent touch support (try using web Google Sheets with a touch screen, without scroll-flinging it is very odd), and offline support (apps are much more often built to handle intermittent network). It's a strange device, I'll say that, but much more capable than a pure Android tablet.

Honesty is for the most part less profitable than dishonesty. -- Plato

Working...