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VR Researchers Manipulate Human Visual System To Create An Infinite Corridor In a Fixed Space (roadtovr.com) 63

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Road to VR: This video showcases a new redirected walking implementation project that creates an "unlimited" virtual corridor in a space just 5 x 7 meters in size. Redirected walking (RDW) is a technique which aims to maximize the physical space of a virtual reality play space by tricking your senses. Or, "strongly modifying spatial perception" so that your mind believes, for example, that you're body is traveling in a straight line where in reality, it's traversing a carefully calculated curved course to keep that play space small. At SIGGRAPH last week, a project developed in part by Unity Product Evangelist and Education Lead Yohei Yanase at the University of Tokyo was present, featuring a new "Visuo-Haptic" VR experience which claims to create the illusion via an infinite virtual corridor within an actual physical play space of just 5 x 7 meters in size.

"It works by strongly modifying spatial perception, all while avoiding the typical "reorientation" manipulation methods that most often cause VR motion sickness," states a press release, "And it's designed to let multiple people experience it simultaneously, without risk of bumping into each other. Modern techniques like this could represent the next phase in VR navigation, merging virtual with physical environments to extend the comfort of VR sessions and extensibility of virtual environments."

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VR Researchers Manipulate Human Visual System To Create An Infinite Corridor In a Fixed Space

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  • by DontBeAMoran ( 4843879 ) on Wednesday March 28, 2018 @11:42PM (#56345049)

    All I can say is that the users are going around in circles.

  • One step closer to the world of THX-1138
  • old news? (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward
    dude this is from almost two years ago :/
  • by Anonymous Coward

    Hikers and other outdoorsy types know you always pick a fixed and distant point to walk towards because using closer landmarks (or none at all) always results in walking in a circle. This is primarily because our legs are different lengths, but also because humans are really bad at judging small subtle changes over time.

    It's kind of cool they found the minimum radius, but otherwise this is nothing new.

    • Hikers and other outdoorsy types know you always pick a fixed and distant point to walk towards because using closer landmarks (or none at all) always results in walking in a circle. This is primarily because our legs are different lengths

      That sounds like something off Brass Eye.

  • Back in the late 80's, when it was already a rather obsolete system, I ran 3-Demon on an IBM-PC Junior.

    3-Demon is a wireframe 3-D version of Pacman. It runs pretty good on a PC-XT, but one of the amusing things about playing it on a PC Junior (which among other things lacks a DMA controller) is that the game severely slows down if you turn to face a particularly long corridor.

    3-Demon creates an infinite corridor in a fixed space. With 128K of RAM and no DMA controller (among other limitations).

    • by Anonymous Coward

      3-Demon creates an infinite corridor in a fixed space.

      No, it doesn't. I played that game a lot. It gave a wireframe representation of a 17 x 19 map. The longest corridor was 17 long.
      Here is a video of 3-Demon. [youtube.com] Thanks for reminding me of this game, I loved it.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    This is literally a major editor fail. This article is from 2016.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Can you just make 2d cartoons hand drawn again? Cuphead was better than all of 3D until now.

  • Redirected walking (Score:5, Informative)

    by UglyMike ( 639031 ) on Thursday March 29, 2018 @03:38AM (#56345473)
    As has been noted, this video is TWO YEARS OLD, while there is a much more recent redirected walking" article [roadtovr.com] available using a much more advanced teechnique....
  • This looks great, but it still has limitiation, this time other kind of limitations to the other sort of motion. And I don't know about you, but I don't have a 5x7 space at home free for this type of solution. If I have that much space, I don't really have to use this kind of method..
    • Really? If a 5x7m space were enough to freely roam through a vast game world from end to end, I'd certainly prefer that to having to teleport between points that I could then explore within the limits of a 5x7m box.

      Of course, I wouldn't want to explore the world with my hand constantly on a wall, which seems to be an important part of this trick. Without that it sounds like the minimum radius is ~22m, or a 44x44m space, probably considerably larger since at any moment you might decide to turn away from th

  • The example is a bit odd and actually, trivial , but it does resemble the idea of VR in curved space (Riemann manifold), like what you have in General Relativity.

  • I swear I saw something about using a treadmill that can move in every direction as a solution to VR movement in a confined space...

    • Lots of options, but mostly very sub-optimal. I've seen
      - the giant "gerbil ball" models (a nuisance getting in and out of, and you pretty much require wireless VR, which isn't here yet.
      - the "running in a bowl wearing slippery shoes" model, which is considerably more affordable and doesn't mind wires, but requires an abdominal harness to keep you from falling on your ass, which also prevents a wide range of natural motion (no crouching or bending over too far)
      - and various actual powered treadmills, which

  • Due to limited physical (real) space, the goal is to give the illusion of walking in a straight line when you're really walking to a circle. This can be done (up to a point) by projecting the image of a straight corridor, and rotating the mapping of virtual world to real world as the user walks. The point of this article/video is that the illusion can be made more effective by adding haptic feedback allowing the user to feel the virtual "straight" wall with his hand. "More effective" means that the radiu
    • Considering that they say the minimum radius is 22m (i.e. a 44x44m space) without the haptic feedback, I'd say an almost 9x reduction in radius is a bit more than "somewhat" smaller. The extra 2m are, I assume, the width of the hallway, and not directly relevant to the minimum "straight" radius.

      Still, I'm having a hard time imagining a lot of compelling VR experiences that require you to keep one hand on the wall at all times.

  • "And it's designed to let multiple people experience it simultaneously, without risk of bumping into each other." What if I ran?
  • This sounds similar (but different) to when they did the walking while blindfolded tests. You would think you would notice that you are curving, but they showed that when blindfolded, you have no idea if you are walking in circles or maintaining a straight line, even when the person was trying to walk as straight as possible. Add to that VR that is actively trying to fool you, and I can see how this could be highly effective. When do I get this for my Oculus?
  • With the current gear, enjoying VR makes you look like a complete dork. I suspect that, like in Brainstorm, until the equipment can be reduced to something much more discreet, only dorks and those who need it for professional reasons, will use it in public.
    • Um, considering that it basically renders you completely blind to the real world, I'd venture a guess that nobody but a complete idiot would use it in public - with the exception of in an arcade where everybody around you is already a self-professed dork anyway. Or at work, where it's a valuable tool, and $#@! what you look like.

  • Scooby Doo has been doing this for decades, dude.
  • Ah, so *THIS* is how the Talosians kept Captain Pike from bouncing off the walls of his cage. I always wondered about that.

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