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Opera Open Sources Dragonfly 78

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the microsoft-soon-to-launch-flyswatter dept.
netux writes to mention that Opera has released Dragonfly, their answer to Firebug, as an open source project under the BSD license. The release features a complete architectural overhaul using a modern version of the Scope Protocol (STP-1), a Mercurial repository on BitBucket, and a Wiki to get the ball rolling. "This is Opera’s first full open source project, so there will be a learning curve. We ask you to bear with us while we get everything up and running and policies in place. Coming from a closed source background there are some hurdles to overcome, such as the current bug tracking system being on a closed server. We hope to migrate to an open bug tracking system as the project gets on its feet."
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Opera Open Sources Dragonfly

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  • by eldavojohn (898314) * <eldavojohn AT gmail DOT com> on Friday February 19, 2010 @10:37AM (#31199740) Journal
    Dragonfly? Well, guess the FreeBSD fork by Matt Dillon (not the actor) that was named Dragonfly will now have to be referred to as Dragonfly BSD [wikipedia.org] to avoid confusion. That was one of the first live Linux distributions I played around with and what comes to mind when I hear the name "Dragonfly" in software.

    It boggles my mind why people pick project names that are not more original. You're basically shooting yourself in the foot as far as domain registration, marketability and search rankings are concerned.

    Opera was originally a Norwegian company, right? They should have went with the Norwegian word for Dragonfly: "Øyenstikker." Which literally means "Eye Poker." Well, okay, maybe not ...
    • by bcmm (768152) on Friday February 19, 2010 @10:41AM (#31199774)

      That was one of the first live Linux distributions I played around with and what comes to mind when I hear the name "Dragonfly" in software.

      A Linux distribution typically involves Linux.


      As for the rest, I agree that it's a bit confusing, especially given the choice of license.

      • by eldavojohn (898314) * <eldavojohn AT gmail DOT com> on Friday February 19, 2010 @10:44AM (#31199822) Journal

        A Linux distribution typically involves Linux.

        Yep, I'm an idiot. I mean FreeBSD. It was the first "live disc" that I ever experimented with.

        Shall I assume the fetal position now or should my strategy be to hope that one of the first blows is directly to my skull resulting in my immediate unconsciousness?

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          We would add you technological and biological distinctiveness into our own, but your uncaring reference to Dragonfly BSD as a Linux distro has caused us to feel that such distinctiveness would result in a lesser ability to assimilate others. We will still make life hell for you, though.Oh, and resistance is futile.
        • by ArsonSmith (13997) on Friday February 19, 2010 @11:20AM (#31200308) Journal

          That's OK the so called FreeBSD and other "UNIX" operating systems are Linux Like operating system

          • by eldavojohn (898314) * <eldavojohn AT gmail DOT com> on Friday February 19, 2010 @11:25AM (#31200396) Journal

            That's OK ...

            *pauses from apologetically grovelling*

            Is this some sort of trap? Are ... are you sure you're a Slashdot user? I would rather confuse Mohammad with Jesus in an internationally distributed newspaper attributed to my real name than confuse Linux with FreeBSD on Slashdot under a pseudonym.

          • Great! Now I can read usenet and email. Too bad Verizon has stopped carrying Usenet groups and providing POP email. They also refuse to give me the password on my modem so I can open the incoming ports. My Internet Service Provider has slowly-but-surely turned a WWW-only Provider. :-(

            Anyway...... this is great news. I love Opera and Opera Dragonfly sounds like a great product. I wish them much success with their new open source plan. I hope the users are patient enough to withstand the transition from close

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by mewsenews (251487)

          Shall I assume the fetal position now or should my strategy be to hope that one of the first blows is directly to my skull resulting in my immediate unconsciousness?

          *sigh* Another one seeking death in the BSD vs Linux affair, is it?

          My son, the great Stallman taught us to be wary of those seeking martyrdom. Do you truly believe your actions worthy of those men that gave their lives in glory for Emacs vs Vi, or even more recently, Gnome vs KDE?

          No. To your feet, knave. Your sentence is a short duration of trol

        • by natehoy (1608657)

          No worries, just put your geek card in the shredder and we'll call it even. When you leave the geekosphere and emerge into the social world again, the first girlfriend who dumps you is punishment enough.

        • FreeBSD supporters are dying - blows to their skulls confirm it.

      • I wonder what Debian GNU/kFreeBSD [debian.org] would be considered.

    • Re: (Score:1, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      This just goes to show you how out of touch those in the web community are with the greater open source community. I mean, the Firefox developers fucked up twice, with the second time being when they outright stole the name of the Firebird [firebirdsql.org] RDBMS.

      • It's kind of too bad, though. You have Thunderbird, Sunbird, and Fire... fox. Nobody even knows what I firefox is. For years, I kept hearing people refer to the browser as "Fox Fire".

      • by Duradin (1261418)
        And the Firebird RDBMS stole its name from Pontiac.
    • by maxume (22995)

      Live Linux BSD?

      Confusion indeed.

    • by Rhaban (987410) on Friday February 19, 2010 @10:43AM (#31199818)

      The name is not new, dragonfly has been in opera for something like 2 years.

      Since it can not possibly be mistaken for dragonfly bsd, I think it's not a real problem. If you want your product name not to be used for something else, start by not using an existing word.

      • by idontgno (624372)

        Since it can not possibly be mistaken for dragonfly bsd, I think it's not a real problem.

        Sup dawg, I heard you like Open Source so I put a Dragonfly in your Dragonfly so you can Open Source while you Open Source.

    • Using similar names makes sense in marketing. "I'm looking for a civic." "Oh no, you meant Cirrus. We have one of those right over here," says the marketing drone. Confusion == opportunity to mislead customer.

      Sometimes I think spending ten years in retail made me cynical. l-)

    • Dragonfly? Well, guess the FreeBSD fork by Matt Dillon (not the actor) that was named Dragonfly will now have to be referred to as Dragonfly BSD [wikipedia.org] to avoid confusion. That was one of the first live Linux distributions I played around with and what comes to mind when I hear the name "Dragonfly" in software.

      It boggles my mind why people pick project names that are not more original. You're basically shooting yourself in the foot as far as domain registration, marketability and search rankings are concerned.

      First thing I thought of was the CMS [dragonflycms.org]... Obviously this is a crowded namespace. Seems to me that they could have picked something a little more original.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      Dragonfly? Well, guess the FreeBSD fork by Matt Dillon (not the actor) that was named Dragonfly will now have to be referred to as Dragonfly BSD to avoid confusion.

      It already was for as long as I can remember.

      It boggles my mind why people pick project names that are not more original. You're basically shooting yourself in the foot as far as domain registration, marketability and search rankings are concerned.

      When introduced, Opera Dragonfly was not a separate product - more like a feature in Opera. It's something that comes out of the box, so it doesn't need any particular marketability apart from Opera itself.

    • by mikkelm (1000451) on Friday February 19, 2010 @12:00PM (#31200882)

      I agree completely with your argument against adopting names used elsewhere. I was googling for local lacrosse teams, and next thing you know I'm at a dealership buying a Buick. It's so confusing.

      • If a motorcycle company decided to release a motorcycle called Buick, it might be more comparable. In this case it is two pieces of open-source software meant to run on general computing hardware.

        • by mikkelm (1000451)

          I think what you're meant to do is demonstrate how one is considerably more confusing than the other.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by amicusNYCL (1538833)

          In this case it is two pieces of open-source software meant to run on general computing hardware.

          If you're going to describe it in the broadest possible terms, then yeah you can introduce confusion. If you realize that one of them is an operating system, and one of them is essentially a browser plugin, then you can use the context of the discussion to remove ambiguity.

          "I used Dragonfly to inspect the DOM and modify some styles."

          What do you think that means, do you think that means someone booted into BSD and somehow loaded up a document object and stylesheets into the OS?

          "I booted into Dragonfly and u

          • Yeah, until you try to search on the less popular of the two, and only get search results for the more popular. I had a lot of trouble with this when Firebird was a browser from mozilla and an open-source SQL engine.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      Chrome was a bit of a crap name too. Any time I'm searching for something chrome related, I wind up with Firefox pages since they cover the same topics along with the word "chrome". It's bleedin' annoying, that's what it is!!! :D
    • by jgrahn (181062)

      Opera was originally a Norwegian company, right? They should have went with the Norwegian word for Dragonfly: "Øyenstikker." Which literally means "Eye Poker." Well, okay, maybe not ...

      Yeah, dragonfiles were not well-liked in N Europe in the past [wikipedia.org]. I particularly like "troll's spindle" and "Satan's little horse".

  • by metamechanical (545566) on Friday February 19, 2010 @10:42AM (#31199806)

    Would someone be so kind as to provide a mirror?

    I tried to RTFA, but my office has my.opera.com blocked under the Forbidden Category "Intimate Apparel/Swimsuit". Who knew?

    • by zxSpectrum (129457) on Friday February 19, 2010 @10:45AM (#31199846) Homepage Journal

      Here:

      Since the inception of Opera Dragonfly, we planned for it to become an open source project. It has always been released under an open source BSD licence, but the source repositories were on Opera servers. Starting today, Opera Dragonfly is a fully open source project, hosted on BitBucket. Since the previous version of Opera Dragonfly, a lot of work has gone on behind the scenes replacing the existing architecture with a modern version of the Scope Protocol STP-1. Opera Dragonfly has been rewritten to use this faster and more efficient version of Scope. Now that we believe that the underlying protocol is stable and performant, and a public desktop build has been released with this included, it is time to put Opera Dragonfly on a public Mercurial repository.

      If you have a Mercurial client you can visit the Opera Dragonfly STP-1 repository and check out the source code. We have provided initial documentation in the Wiki to get you started. This is Operas first full open source project, so there will be a learning curve. We ask you to bear with us while we get everything up and running and policies in place. Coming from a closed source background there are some hurdles to overcome, such as the current bug tracking system being on a closed server. We hope to migrate to an open bug tracking system as the project gets on its feet.

      As well as the current and previous versions of the Opera Dragonfly source code, we have released a couple of tools to help with Opera Dragonfly development. The first is Dragonkeeper. This is a standalone proxy, which translates STP (Scope Transport Protocol) to HTTP. This can also be useful for remote debugging. The second tool is Hob. Hob is a utility to create code from Protocol Buffer descriptions. Protocol Buffers are one of the formats Scope STP-1 supports along with JSON and XML.

      The focus of the current release of Opera Dragonfly was stability and performance. As such you will not see a great deal of new features. We believe it was invaluable to build a strong foundation, so we can advance faster, with less issues in the future. Two new features you may notice since the previous desktop release are a new element highlight (first introduced in Opera Mobile), and a colour picker utility. The highlight has been optimised since the mobile release, and supports visualising the metrics of an element on the page, and multiple element selection. The colour picker is still in early development. It allows for the magnification and selection of colours from the Web page. The value of the colour is displayed in both HSL, RGB and hexadecimal formats. Work has also began behind the scenes to take advantage of HTML5 Web Storage to store users settings and preferences. This will eventually allow the application to be greatly customisable, and to remember layout and settings from a previous session. One of the biggest usability issues has also been solved, with inspect element being available from the Web page context menu. This reduces the steps needed to start debugging a Web page.

      The current focus for the Scope protocol is improving the JavaScript debugger. This work is nearing completion on the Scope side, and will provide functionality such as the Firebug Console API.

      We hope you enjoy this version of Opera Dragonfly, and that some of you will be inspired enough to help with the Opera Dragonfly project. If you like a challenge, this is a great place to start. Visit the Opera Dragonfly repository to find out more information.

    • Ahh, I've had this problem before. Autodial ended up being the culprit.

  • by Kjella (173770) on Friday February 19, 2010 @11:06AM (#31200118) Homepage

    netux writes to mention that Opera has released Dragonfly, their answer to Firebug, as an open source project under the BSD license. The release features a complete architectural overhaul using a modern version of the Scope Protocol (STP-1), a Mercurial repository on BitBucket, and a Wiki to get the ball rolling.

    But would it be too much to ask that the summary contains at least once sentence about WTF the Scope Protocol is and what it can be used for?

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Kjella (173770)

      Comment above was written in C++ instead of C and thus contains a C too many. Please do a C-- before mentally compiling.

    • Re: (Score:1, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      After googling it (as TFA is slashdotted for me), the relevant information that is missing from the headline//blurb is:
       

      Opera Dragonfly is a cross device, cross platform debugging environment for the Opera browser

    • by StikyPad (445176)

      Is it too much to ask that people type some words into a box at the top of the browser [lmgtfy.com], and then actually contribute to the discussion? FFS, it's the first result:

      Today we are happy to release the specification [opera.com] for the Scope protocol. This is the protocol used for communication between the Opera browser and Opera Dragonfly.

    • Based on my experience, I'd say they're just waiting for somebody to ask so they can promote Google and call you stupid.
  • Grumble (Score:5, Funny)

    by m.dillon (147925) on Friday February 19, 2010 @11:22AM (#31200346) Homepage

    Sigh.

    --- Matt starts working on Opera Viruses.

    -Matt

    • by davonshire (94424)

      Go Matt Go! Opera is for the rich and snooty! And you can only enjoy it if the acoustics are just right and you have a decent.. ooh wait....the browser currently known as Opera.

      I'll have to sing a different tune now.

      Davonshire

    • Just wait, next week they'll announce Dragon Fly comes with HammerFS A cloud based FS for storing your Dragon Fly Related data.
  • by Ltap (1572175)
    ... for finally being a man (figuratively) and actually open-sourcing something, rather than trying to squeeze blood from a stone (or money from a browser). Admittedly, this is only a peripheral part, but hopefully this will start a gradual transition.
    • Yeah silly them (Score:5, Interesting)

      by SmallFurryCreature (593017) on Friday February 19, 2010 @01:18PM (#31201900) Journal

      It is not like they make any money by selling it to Nintendo and others, they should opensource their code just because.

      Opera is the perfect example of how closed source and opensource can exist next to each other AND show you the advantages and disadvantages of both models.

      Firefox vs Opera has some interesting differences. Firefox is more adjustable especially with its extensions, Opera feels more solid like someone actually was in charge of all its different features and insisted they work together. Take mouse-gestures and tabbed browsing. Firefox gives more choice but it feels very clear that these things are bolted on, while in Opera they come as they are but are how the browser has been designed to work from the start.

      No, keep Opera closed source, competition from different suppliers is a good thing.

      • by Ltap (1572175)
        I love how I got modded down for this. Opera fanboys, I suppose.

        I don't see your point. Open-source projects can compete, too, you know.
  • The EU fines Firebug 3.5 billion euro and demands a web development tool ballot screen in 3...2...1...

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