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Power Technology Science

Seafloor Carpet Mimics Muddy Seabed To Harness Wave Power 20

Posted by samzenpus
from the waves-keep-coming dept.
Zothecula writes "Many organizations around the world are looking at ways to harness the power of waves as a renewable energy source, but none are covering quite the same ground as a team of engineers from the University of California (UC), Berkeley. The seafloor carpet, a system inspired by the wave absorbing abilities of a muddy seabed, has taken exploring the potential of wave power to some intriguing new depths."
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Seafloor Carpet Mimics Muddy Seabed To Harness Wave Power

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  • by LaminatorX (410794) <sabotageNO@SPAMpraecantator.com> on Monday February 24, 2014 @01:18PM (#46324481) Homepage

    I wonder what they could do with their structures as far as encouraging coral growth or providing spawning shelters? Clean energy is obviously the primary goal of the project, but anything building on the seafloor should hopefully take a look at the whole picture.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by AvitarX (172628)

      I would think carpeting the bottom of the ocean would be a disaster for marine life.

      • I would think carpeting the bottom of the ocean would be a disaster for marine life.

        So... you think that hardwood flooring might be a better option? Or perhaps a nice ceramic tile, maybe in a nice faux-granite?

  • This carpet would could be set up in areas of coastal erosion. The energy taken from the wave is not available to destroy the coast so it could be a win win for certain area of the world.
  • Im tired of all these "Green" projects that turn a blind eye to environmental impacts. Just build some goddamn nuclear reactors. Do people really think carpeting the goddamn ocean floor, or building huge dams, wont affect the ecosystem?
    • by gregor-e (136142)
      TFA says: "The researchers are considering whether the ever-growing number of nearshore “dead zones” – low-oxygen regions in the ocean with little marine life – would be strong candidates for pilot testing their system."

Never make anything simple and efficient when a way can be found to make it complex and wonderful.

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