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Microsoft Backtracks On 'Nasty Trick' Upgrade To Windows 10 (bbc.co.uk) 376

Reader Raging Bool writes: Days after angering many users with its so-called "nasty trick", Microsoft has reversed its crazy decision to infuriate users by upgrading them to Windows 10 automatically. Users were angry that clicking the cross to dismiss the box meant that they had agreed to the upgrade. Based on "customer feedback", Microsoft said it would add another notification that provided customers with "an additional opportunity for cancelling the upgrade". Microsoft told the BBC it had modified the pop-up as a result of criticism: "We've added another notification that confirms the time of the scheduled upgrade and provides the customer an additional opportunity for cancelling or rescheduling the upgrade. If the customer wishes to continue with their upgrade at the designated time, they can click 'OK' or close the notifications with no further action needed."
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Microsoft Backtracks On 'Nasty Trick' Upgrade To Windows 10

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  • Malware trick (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @01:32PM (#52180487)

    A typical malware trick, make the close button install the stuff.

    Criminals.

    • Re:Malware trick (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Infiniti2000 ( 1720222 ) on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @01:34PM (#52180503)
      Agreed. Fuck you, Microsoft. I had already trained my 9yo son to press the X to close the upgrade window whenever he might see it (he uses my computer more than I). Saturday morning, Windows 10 was installed. Goddamn it.
      • Re:Malware trick (Score:5, Insightful)

        by wkwilley2 ( 4278669 ) on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @01:37PM (#52180533)

        Almost seems like they were betting on the vetted response for popups, which is to hit the X immediately after it pops up.

        • You mean they had telemetry which told them people's behavior? On Windows 7? But I thought Windows 7 was safe!

          • Re:Malware trick (Score:5, Informative)

            by JohnFen ( 1641097 ) on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @02:00PM (#52180741)

            Microsoft retrofitted much of its Win 10 spyware into Windows 7 updates a while back.

            • Microsoft retrofitted much of its Win 10 spyware into Windows 7 updates a while back.

              How can I check to see if I was infected with this Windows Malware in my Win 7 system?

              And second, if it did do that, is there any way to throw the genie out of the bottle? (Get rid of the spyware?)

              • Re:Malware trick (Score:5, Informative)

                by JohnFen ( 1641097 ) on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @02:43PM (#52181181)

                Unlike with Windows 10, with Windows 7 you actually can remove the spyware. Check out this link: https://www.reddit.com/r/pcmas... [reddit.com]

              • Yep. Install from a pirated copy of Win7 and DO NOT install any updates from MS ever. That is how my system stays safe and secure.
              • Re:Malware trick (Score:5, Informative)

                by jez9999 ( 618189 ) on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @05:19PM (#52182849) Homepage Journal

                Here's my personal page I follow for avoiding Win10 & Telemetry:

                http://game-point.net/misc/dontEnableAutomaticUpdates/ [game-point.net]

      • Agreed. Fuck you, Microsoft. I had already trained my 9yo son to press the X to close the upgrade window whenever he might see it (he uses my computer more than I). Saturday morning, Windows 10 was installed. Goddamn it.

        Doesn't Windows auto-generate a System Restore Point when you do an "Upgrade"/"Update"?

        If so, I would imagine you can change your mind pretty easily.

        • Re: (Score:2, Troll)

          by ColdWetDog ( 752185 )

          With your nic you might be forgiven for thinking that a "System Restore Point" actually did something along those lines.

          The Rest of Us know better.

          • With your nic you might be forgiven for thinking that a "System Restore Point" actually did something along those lines.

            The Rest of Us know better.

            Thanks for the snarky, but uninformative, response.

            And I am (rather obviously) no friend of Microsoft; but isn't there an "uninstall upgrade" that is offered for some sort of limited time, like 30 days?

            Ah yes, here it is [cnet.com].

            Thanks for NOTHING, smartass. You were so proud of yourself riffing on my username that you completely ignored my question (Can you roll-back from Windows 10).

            Good Job!

            • You were being trolled. It's not hard to roll back the upgrade.

            • by PRMan ( 959735 )
              Actually, though, System Restore Points used to be great but now are completely useless as they hose your system beyond repair.
              • by bondsbw ( 888959 )

                I rolled back the latest Windows Insider build just a few days ago. It works just fine, even in the bleeding edge versions.

            • Re:Malware trick (Score:4, Informative)

              by oh_my_080980980 ( 773867 ) on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @02:42PM (#52181171)
              At your own risk: ""My attempt to roll it back to Windows 7 resulted in the blue screen of death and a dead PC. I now have to reinstall my home computer from scratch because of this so-called 'free' upgrade."

              RTFA.
        • Re:Malware trick (Score:4, Interesting)

          by dpidcoe ( 2606549 ) on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @06:22PM (#52183345)

          Doesn't Windows auto-generate a System Restore Point when you do an "Upgrade"/"Update"?

          Two problems with this:

          1) The installation and subsequent restore take a significant amount of time (we're talking 2-3 hours on a laptop hdd). My mom experienced the joys of this when her computer spontaneously decided to update in the middle of her typing a report for work. It took 2 hours to install windows 10 (no way to stop it once it starts), and then another 2 hours to restore back to windows 8.1 when I declined the windows 10 EULA.

          2) If the computer can't boot to windows 10 after the "upgrade", restoring it back to the previous OS as if nothing ever happened gets complicated (if not impossible). I haven't experienced it firsthand, but other slashdot users have reported windows 10 spontaneously installing on older computers that couldn't support it and basically requiring a clean reinstall in order to work.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by mlts ( 1038732 )

      This is common across the ad industry now. Either a fake "X", that takes you to some shitty app or website, or the "close" button brings up AdChoices's "is this ad bad?" menu. This started back in the days of Bonzi Buddy, and is a common trick. Ad blocking extensions have stopped that problem on the desktop, but it is a chronic thing on iOS.

      • This is common across the ad industry now. Either a fake "X", that takes you to some shitty app or website, or the "close" button brings up AdChoices's "is this ad bad?" menu. This started back in the days of Bonzi Buddy, and is a common trick. Ad blocking extensions have stopped that problem on the desktop, but it is a chronic thing on iOS.

        Might be one of the reasons why Apple is stopping iAd.

      • Re:Malware trick (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Darinbob ( 1142669 ) on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @04:50PM (#52182595)

        Actually that "X" is legitimate. It does exactly what any "X" does and closes the notification. The snag is that Windows 10 upgrade is already scheduled to happen even if you do nothing and click on nothing! The way to stop it is to click on the "here" in the sentence "Click here to change upgrade schedule or cancel scheduled upgrade." In other words you have to click on something that is not a button.

        The "X" button is probably the only innocent thing in that notification.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    For all the people that were already tricked or forced into the upgrade. I know of several people who said no each and every time they were prompted for the upgrade, and yet, when they came back to their PC after being away a few days to find that their PC was now on Windows 10 waiting to show them "all the nice new unwanted telemetry, spying and all-around ass-hattery" that M$ had forced on them.

  • by mrchaotica ( 681592 ) * on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @01:36PM (#52180521)

    Microsoft says they'll give "an additional opportunity for cancelling the upgrade" -- because respecting the user's choice the first (or second, or fifth, or 20th) time clearly isn't considered by those assholes to be an option!

    • "User's choice" (Score:5, Insightful)

      by The MAZZTer ( 911996 ) <megazzt.gmail@com> on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @02:11PM (#52180857) Homepage

      I think the problem is users are confusing the dialog for a typical multiple-choice decision dialog. It's common to click the close button when you're not sure since that typically selects the "safe" option. But the close button does not always do this, it depends on the type of window. If I close Outlook, I expect it to still have all my e-mails when I open it up again; if I find it cancelled my account I would be upset. In that case, clicking close is assumed to mean that the user does not want any changes to happen to their e-mail; they are done with it for now.

      Microsoft was a bit overzealous in scheduling upgrades for users. The dialog that shows up is NOT a decision dialog; the decision was already made by Microsoft! It was an informational dialog to notify you of the decision (and gives you an apparently difficult-to-find control to change this decision). Informational dialogs, by definition, do nothing when you close them; the upgrade would have been kept and that was perfectly in line with the standard for Windows UX. Unfortunately it also proved to be confusing, but I don't think it was malicious. Clearly Microsoft needed to change it since it was confusing users, and they are doing so.

      Windows Update works the same way. If you start an update and close the window, the update does not stop. Instead it continues running in the background, since it is an important (to Microsoft) process. So it's understandable a similar process, the upgrade, would be designed to work in a similar way. Like I said, actual user experience now shows it was confusing so it's good MS is changing it.

      • Re:"User's choice" (Score:4, Informative)

        by Darinbob ( 1142669 ) on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @04:57PM (#52182667)

        The close button does indeed close the notification. But the rest of the notification is designed to fool people. Most of the dialogue is in older Windows GUI style. The "Upgrade now" choice is a classic button. But the opt out method is not a button but is a metro style web like "link" to click on, with only a change in color and thus easily overlooked (especially by people on Windows 7 not used to the metro UI).

    • Microsoft says they'll give "an additional opportunity for cancelling the upgrade" -- because respecting the user's choice the first (or second, or fifth, or 20th) time clearly isn't considered by those assholes to be an option!

      You clearly could not be bothered to read the article. The pop up stated that Win 10 is now a recommended update, and that the user set their computer to install recommended updates automatically.

    • Why the sudden push before the free Windows 10 upgrade campaign expires on July 29, 2016?? If they're really afraid people aren't adopting the "upgrade" fast enough, I don't see why Microsoft can't just push the date back to the Fall or next year. In fact, they might even.

  • Bad to worse (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    One thing is certain, the people at Microsoft are extremely disrespectful to their users. They just don't care. I wonder how many users were tricked with this little stunt? I wonder how many of those people had their computer broken by it? How many of them just bought new computers? A new computer is a terrible way to get people to switch to Windows 10!

    • by cfalcon ( 779563 )

      > I wonder how many users were tricked with this little stunt?

      Given that they disabled it, the answer is "enough". They knew from the start that this wouldn't fly- the question was how many people they could trick. Clearly, since it happened to everyone all at once, they have achieved their desired percent penetration.

  • i will buy an android tablet or chromebook before i buy any more MS_Windows products
  • Why did Microsoft ignore the tsunami of complaints about the definitely tricky upgrade pop up box? Did the BBC embarrass them into submission? This is quite strange. And fuck you Microsoft. That is all.
    • by Darinbob ( 1142669 ) on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @05:01PM (#52182709)

      No, if you look closely there is no apology or backtracking. They are offering a second chance notification that will probably do exactly the same thing.

      "If the customer wishes to continue with their upgrade at the designated time, they can click 'OK' or close the notifications with no further action needed."

      In other words, if you close the notification then you'll be upgraded to Windows 10. No where have they said that they'll make it easier to opt out, and the statement above means that they will not go to an opt-in process and are still relying on the strategy of fooling the users.

  • Just start upgrading everyone's 2k3 & 2k8 to 2016 Server.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @01:55PM (#52180699)

    something tells me that this additional option will be on "display", like in the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy:

    “But Mr Dent, the plans have been available in the local planning office for the last nine months.”
    “Oh yes, well as soon as I heard I went straight round to see them, yesterday afternoon. You hadn’t exactly gone out of your way to call attention to them, had you? I mean, like actually telling anybody or anything.”
    “But the plans were on display ”
    “On display? I eventually had to go down to the cellar to find them.”
    “That’s the display department.”
    “With a flashlight.”
    “Ah, well the lights had probably gone.”
    “So had the stairs.”
    “But look, you found the notice didn’t you?”
    “Yes,” said Arthur, “yes I did. It was on display in the bottom of a locked filing cabinet stuck in a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying ‘Beware of the Leopard’.”

  • Dirtiest Jobs' newest episode: Microsoft support helpline *cringe*
    • Have you ever called it?
      All they do is transfer you to another department...
      Its the grandest circle jerk of all time!
  • Next Try (Score:5, Insightful)

    by PPH ( 736903 ) on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @01:59PM (#52180727)

    A popup with an "Upgrade to Windows 10 now? [ ]Yes [ ]No" message.
    Where the "[ ] No" checkbox is animated and keeps running away from the mouse.

  • Huh? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Andreas Mayer ( 1486091 ) on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @02:04PM (#52180783) Homepage

    If the customer wishes to continue with their upgrade at the designated time, they can click 'OK' or close the notifications with no further action needed.

    Isn't that exactly what they were doing already in the criticized "nasty trick" dialog?

    Let me quote from the slashdot submission on that thing:

    "This means dismissing the box does not dismiss the update."

    And now it reads:

    "If the customer wishes to continue with their upgrade [...] they can [...] close the notifications with no further action needed"

    So they are "listening to user feedback" by doing the exact same thing a second time?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      So true, its still going to force install eventually. Make sure to uninstall kb3035583, then check and hide it in the updates. Eventually though, I expect them to work around that and find some other way to force it on. With all my business customers having windows 7 specific Software(like Point of Sale or medical equipment), this is making a mess out of everything.

  • by Dunbal ( 464142 ) * on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @02:05PM (#52180797)
    Let's call it what it is: FRAUD. The "X" symbol in the top right corner of a window has been used to close a window since windows has existed. Therefore there's a pretty clear precedent established that when a user clicks there, he means to close the window. Changing the meaning of this symbol and causing it to do something completely opposite to what is intended without prior notice is a completely deceptive practice. Microsoft should be ashamed. Microsoft might also be liable. After all, any EULA for the current OS cannot cover or hide DECEPTIVE PRACTICES BY MICROSOFT. And of course you can't be held under any Windows 10 EULA since you quite obviously chose the "X" to not install it. So I hope these fraudulent installs trashed or tied up some important machines and lawyers are getting ready to take them to court. It's no less than they deserve for stooping to the level of scam internet pop-up ads.
    • Let's call it what it is: FRAUD. The "X" symbol in the top right corner of a window has been used to close a window since windows has existed. Therefore there's a pretty clear precedent established that when a user clicks there, he means to close the window. Changing the meaning of this symbol and causing it to do something completely opposite to what is intended without prior notice is a completely deceptive practice.

      Let's call it what it is: You only ever read the article summary and for some reason trust Slashdot summaries. Here's a link to the popup [bbci.co.uk]. Notice anything? Keep looking. Oh, that's right, it's a pop up letting you know that Windows 10 is now a recommended update and your computer is set to automatically install recommended updates so click here to change your settings if you do not want to do this.

      But, by all means, keep repeating your version.

  • And yet (Score:3, Insightful)

    by JohnFen ( 1641097 ) on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @02:06PM (#52180807)

    And yet, I still hear people saying things like "Microsoft has changed", "Microsoft isn't evil anymore", or even "Microsoft is a good guy now".

    How many times does Microsoft have to demonstrate that they're still the same old Microsoft before people stop believing this nonsense?

    • by Ecuador ( 740021 )

      Well, it is not that Microsoft isn't evil anymore. It is just that others are more evil and, more importantly, much more relevant than Microsoft.

  • by ThatsNotPudding ( 1045640 ) on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @02:07PM (#52180819)
    "Better to ask forgiveness than to ask for permission."



    Lesson Number One is "Steal, rob, and lie at will."

    There are no other lessons. Here's your MBA.
  • by sshir ( 623215 ) on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @02:12PM (#52180863)
    It seems that free upgrade will not go away by the end of July.
    The reasoning is simple: it's very likely that Microsoft has set a threshold number of upgrades to be pushed though by the deadline. The fact that they stooped so low this time around says that somebody is desperate (bye bye bonus). I.e. they realized that they will not hit the threshold in time...
    So, the chances are that the deadline for free upgrades will be pushed (they for sure will find some bogus excuse to save face)
  • Damage to Microsoft brand and reputation already done. Good luck getting it back.

  • Stop this shit with GWX Control Panel or Never10 [grc.com]. I started off using the former on my g/fs computer but once I saw they were stepping up their "optional upgrade" (It's neither), I looked again and found an even better alternative. This is just an executable - I ran it through totalvirus.com first I'm sure you will too.

    Personally I have Win 7 Ultimate on my primary machine (gamer here) and have never seen an nag window but other machines have other versions that have and I'm sick of it. I've even seen a few

  • I propose that when you clicked X on the dialog both times and then get a surprise "upgrade" we call it a double-cross. It seems to capture the attitude adequately.

  • The window in question informed users that Win10 would be downloaded as a Windows Update and then installed at a specific time set by the Windows Update, and then offered a chance to cancel or reschedule. Clicking the [X] dismisses the dialog box with no action taken... but that equated to "Ok" because you needed to take an action to stop the upgrade. It's a violation of standard Windows conventions due to confusion.

    Kinda like a "Would you like to repeal the new tax law? Yes/No" ballot question, where Yes l

  • by QuietLagoon ( 813062 ) on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @02:48PM (#52181233)

    from TFA: Based on "customer feedback", Microsoft said it would add another notification that provided customers with "an additional opportunity for cancelling the upgrade".

    How many friggin' times do I have to tell Microsoft that I DO NOT WANT WINDOWS 10 ON MY PCs?

    .
    If Microsoft is this tone deaf about my desires now, what would it be like when/if I ever decide to upgrade to Windows 10, what will I lose control of then?

  • This is standard Microsoft behavior after a sucky project. Expression Web and FrontPage were discontinued, so their final versions were released as free. Outlook had so many mistakes that Outlook 98 was released as a free standalone download.

    Now comes the headache-causing Windows 8, so 8.1 was quickly published as a fix, and Windows 10 was given to all 7/8 users for free... it's a rollback more than an upgrade, so that's why Microsoft is only charging for new computers, and there's no paid-for upgrade SKU.

  • by HalAtWork ( 926717 ) on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @02:58PM (#52181307)

    What about: () Yes, () No, () Ask me in 10 days, [] Remember my choice, followed by an OK button?

  • by Sax Russell 5449D29A ( 4449961 ) <sax.russell@protonmail.com> on Wednesday May 25, 2016 @03:50PM (#52181915)

    Sure thing, remove the feature after all the damage has been already done. This was a calculated move, and everybody knows that. There were voices inside the company who said this was a bad idea, but execs took the Pinto route and calculated the PR damage to be less than the market share gains. Shows us just how crooked they are under all the sweet talk.

    My wife was infuriated when her computer suddenly started installing Windows 10. That was the last straw for her, she decided to buy a Mac.

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