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'Quit Social Media. Your Career May Depend on It.' (nytimes.com) 186

The New York Times ran a strong opinion piece that talks about one critical reason why everyone should quit social media: your career is dependent on it. The other argues that by spending time on social media and sharing our thoughts, we are demeaning the value of our work, our ideas. (Editor's note: the link could be paywalled; alternate source.) Select excerpts from the story follows:In a capitalist economy, the market rewards things that are rare and valuable. Social media use is decidedly not rare or valuable. Any 16-year-old with a smartphone can invent a hashtag or repost a viral article. The idea that if you engage in enough of this low-value activity, it will somehow add up to something of high value in your career is the same dubious alchemy that forms the core of most snake oil and flimflam in business. Professional success is hard, but it's not complicated. The foundation to achievement and fulfillment, almost without exception, requires that you hone a useful craft and then apply it to things that people care about. [...] Interesting opportunities and useful connections are not as scarce as social media proponents claim. In my own professional life, for example, as I improved my standing as an academic and a writer, I began receiving more interesting opportunities than I could handle. As you become more valuable to the marketplace, good things will find you. To be clear, I'm not arguing that new opportunities and connections are unimportant. I'm instead arguing that you don't need social media's help to attract them. My second objection concerns the idea that social media is harmless. Consider that the ability to concentrate without distraction on hard tasks is becoming increasingly valuable in an increasingly complicated economy. Social media weakens this skill because it's engineered to be addictive. The more you use social media in the way it's designed to be used -- persistently throughout your waking hours -- the more your brain learns to crave a quick hit of stimulus at the slightest hint of boredom. Once this Pavlovian connection is solidified, it becomes hard to give difficult tasks the unbroken concentration they require, and your brain simply won't tolerate such a long period without a fix. Indeed, part of my own rejection of social media comes from this fear that these services will diminish my ability to concentrate -- the skill on which I make my living. A dedication to cultivating your social media brand is a fundamentally passive approach to professional advancement. It diverts your time and attention away from producing work that matters and toward convincing the world that you matter. The latter activity is seductive, especially for many members of my generation who were raised on this message, but it can be disastrously counterproductive.
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'Quit Social Media. Your Career May Depend on It.'

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  • fake opinion. at least, that's my fake opinion.
    • I will say this: I think many people myself included simply do not have time for things like social media except for a limited extent. If you're feeling isolated or down about things in the world it can be like a vitamin B12 shot to hang out in the echo chamber for a while. But most people are busy in life.

      There are people who seem to make their careers living in social media. I guess if they can do it so much the better. But such people, as widely known as they might be, are rare exceptions. Most peop

  • TLDR (Score:5, Funny)

    by fldsofglry ( 2754803 ) on Monday November 21, 2016 @01:25PM (#53332603)
    Too long, didn't read. However, I'll just go ahead and share this on facebook anyway..
    • Re:TLDR (Score:5, Insightful)

      by ShanghaiBill ( 739463 ) on Monday November 21, 2016 @02:08PM (#53332937)

      Too long, didn't read.

      You didn't miss much. TFA is silly. Ideas and thoughts are not "demeaned" by sharing them. Sharing an idea makes it valuable. You can get feedback, and refine the idea, and the chance of one of your lazy friends "stealing" your idea is wildly exaggerated.

      There are plenty of good reasons to minimize social media use, such as wasting time, but even there it is better than passive activities like watching TV. The first warning that you should skip this article is in the first paragraph, when the author brags that "I’ve never had a social media account". So if he has never tried it, how can he be such a big expert about it? Is anyone else sick of listening to non-users acting superior, and preaching on and on about how their choice is the only true path to a perfect life? These people are worse than vegans.

      • Re:TLDR (Score:4, Funny)

        by Narcocide ( 102829 ) on Monday November 21, 2016 @03:19PM (#53333603) Homepage

        Sharing an idea makes it valuable.

        Sharing a fire makes it costly.

      • by golodh ( 893453 )
        @ShanghaiBill

        Ideas and thought aren't demeaned by sharing them but they can stunted and distorted in retelling, grow far beyond their merits, and confuse people who are unable to think critically about what they read. All by sharing them in the wrong place.

        Think of the "echo chamber effect" of e.g. Facebook. The whole scare of inocculations supposedly leading to autism. Birtherism. The Flat Earth theory. The whole "Obama is coming to get your guns" rubbish. The Hollow Earth theory. Fortune telling throu

      • Too long, didn't read.

        You didn't miss much. TFA is silly. Ideas and thoughts are not "demeaned" by sharing them. Sharing an idea makes it valuable. You can get feedback, and refine the idea, and the chance of one of your lazy friends "stealing" your idea is wildly exaggerated.

        There are plenty of good reasons to minimize social media use, such as wasting time, but even there it is better than passive activities like watching TV. The first warning that you should skip this article is in the first paragraph, when the author brags that "I’ve never had a social media account". So if he has never tried it, how can he be such a big expert about it? Is anyone else sick of listening to non-users acting superior, and preaching on and on about how their choice is the only true path to a perfect life? These people are worse than vegans.

        Though he was addressing his message to career oriented people, I watch my granddaughter with facebook or instagram on her cell, eating and never ever leaving her eyes from the cellphone. She has become addicted to a completly wasting her time and is slinking downwards to a high-school grade 11 graduation and no further.

    • Re:TLDR (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Mashiki ( 184564 ) <mashiki@gIIImail.com minus threevowels> on Monday November 21, 2016 @02:08PM (#53332947) Homepage

      Spot on. Now I've got a question...does this mean the people who don't have social media accounts are no longer "dangerous loners, with strong anti-social tendencies" and this will no longer count against them? I seem to remember several stories here in /. pushing the whole "if you don't have a social media account, good luck getting hired." And several more pushing the you're a danger to the public good.

    • by Megane ( 129182 )
      Paragraph breaks would have helped somewhat. Fuck walls of text.
  • Dumb title (Score:5, Insightful)

    by DogDude ( 805747 ) on Monday November 21, 2016 @01:26PM (#53332609)
    That title suggests that the article is about the very real idea that what you post on social media can cost you your career. Instead, it's an article saying that posting on social media won't magically lead to a career. I'm confused as to why the author would ever think that posting on social media could lead to anything in the first place. Very strange premise.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      I'm confused as to why the author would ever think that posting on social media could lead to anything in the first place

      Because for 0.00001% of social media users, it actually does lead to something, much like the 0.00001% of kids destined to be a professional athelete who actually make it.

    • Re:Dumb title (Score:5, Insightful)

      by geekmux ( 1040042 ) on Monday November 21, 2016 @01:49PM (#53332777)

      ...I'm confused as to why the author would ever think that posting on social media could lead to anything in the first place. Very strange premise.

      In a world where YouTube "stars" earn six-figure salaries, and social media "celebrities" are earning far more than that, you're struggling as to how anyone would ever think that posting on social media could lead to anything in the first place??

      It may be narcissistic and nonsensical, but recognize what society AND business actually reward these days related to social media. Cold hard cash is the justification, and that's hardly a strange premise.

      Johnny Knoxville (of Jackass fame) has a net worth north of $50 million. Howard Stern (Shock Jock/Professional Asshole) has a net worth north of $500 million, and earns an eight-figure salary today. It's no surprise how idiocy in entertainment bled over to social media.

      • Hold on. Like it or not Howard Stern is an INCREDIBLY smart person. Shock is only half the reason he is where is is today. Read his book Private Parts. (the movie is good too, but the book goes much deeper into who Howard is)
        • Hold on. Like it or not Howard Stern is an INCREDIBLY smart person. Shock is only half the reason he is where is is today. Read his book Private Parts. (the movie is good too, but the book goes much deeper into who Howard is)

          I did read his book. And I saw the movie. Sorry, not seeing the Einstein between the ass cheeks.

          If a porn star devotes their time to earn a doctorate degree, and continues to be a porn star, they are not demonstrating how incredibly smart or skilled they are in relation to their degree. They are merely demonstrating they are smart enough to recognize which profession is worth their time, or are following the advice of others they've hired.

      • Re:Dumb title (Score:5, Insightful)

        by AthanasiusKircher ( 1333179 ) on Monday November 21, 2016 @02:04PM (#53332909)

        In a world where YouTube "stars" earn six-figure salaries, and social media "celebrities" are earning far more than that, you're struggling as to how anyone would ever think that posting on social media could lead to anything in the first place??

        It may be narcissistic and nonsensical, but recognize what society AND business actually reward these days related to social media. Cold hard cash is the justification, and that's hardly a strange premise.

        Yeah, except compare the number of "YouTube sensations" to the number of posted videos never viewed by more than a few dozen people or whatever.

        Becoming a "social media celebrity" is like becoming of pop music star. Yeah, it can happen, but for every person who "makes" it, there are 10,000 wannabes out there, doing karaoke at the local bar.

        Is there money to be made in social media? Sure, but unless you find a very particular niche or a truly innovative thing to do with it, your chances of making it big are perhaps just a little better than playing the lottery. Merely posting random junk every hour like everyone else does on social media won't make you stand out... hence, I'm pretty sure the message of TFA was you have much better luck getting a job if you instead devote that time to developing actual skills.

        • In a world where YouTube "stars" earn six-figure salaries, and social media "celebrities" are earning far more than that, you're struggling as to how anyone would ever think that posting on social media could lead to anything in the first place??

          It may be narcissistic and nonsensical, but recognize what society AND business actually reward these days related to social media. Cold hard cash is the justification, and that's hardly a strange premise.

          Yeah, except compare the number of "YouTube sensations" to the number of posted videos never viewed by more than a few dozen people or whatever.

          Becoming a "social media celebrity" is like becoming of pop music star. Yeah, it can happen, but for every person who "makes" it, there are 10,000 wannabes out there, doing karaoke at the local bar.

          Is there money to be made in social media? Sure, but unless you find a very particular niche or a truly innovative thing to do with it, your chances of making it big are perhaps just a little better than playing the lottery. Merely posting random junk every hour like everyone else does on social media won't make you stand out... hence, I'm pretty sure the message of TFA was you have much better luck getting a job if you instead devote that time to developing actual skills.

          A mother laughing at Halloween masks (Chewbacca Mom) has since earned thousands in gifts from stores, a paid Disney vacation, and full scholarships for her entire family, valued at over $400,000, all because of a single video that went viral. It hardly takes posting "random junk every hour" when a single video rewards people like that, and it's quite the slap in the face to all those who work insanely hard in order to attend college.

          Viral videos are further proof it doesn't even take tenacity on social med

    • by kuzb ( 724081 )
      I agree it's a bit misleading, but I can sort of see the logic. If it stops you from getting to a career that is in effect costing you a career. Every year you spend not working professionally is lost money.
    • Re:Dumb title (Score:4, Insightful)

      by AthanasiusKircher ( 1333179 ) on Monday November 21, 2016 @01:54PM (#53332817)

      I'm confused as to why the author would ever think that posting on social media could lead to anything in the first place. Very strange premise.

      I could be reading it wrong, but I think this is sort of a spin on the old "networking" and contacts to get jobs trope. "It's not what you know, but who you know" and all that.

      A social media presence keeps you in contact with lots of people, and I suppose the idea is that it's kind of like what people used to do in the old days -- going out and hanging out at the "right" parties, getting drinks with the "right" people, etc. Then when it comes time to get the job or the promotion or whatever, I guess everyone's supposed to say, "Gee, he posts great cat pictures! Let's give him the job!"

      I jest a bit, but not much. I suppose if you're looking for a job that will involve posting on social media, then obviously having a social media presence might be important for getting that job. Otherwise, my experience is that any social media connections are generally much more shallow than even the staged dinners people used to hold (do they still?) for "networking" purposes. I absolutely agree that "knowing the right people" is important for finding a job -- but I have doubts that your social media presence is the way to do that. At best, you maintain some tenuous connection to a "friend" you've barely met, who might chuckle at your cat photo. At worst, you post some political story to your feed without thinking and end up alienating 30% of potential employers you took such care to "friend."

      Doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me. I am officially "friends" through social media with many colleagues in my field (though I basically never post anything there), but the people who are actually going to help me if I want to get a different job or whatever are the people I talk to in person, the people I get coffee or lunch or drinks with, the people who actually KNOW me... not some online spectre of me.

      • All spare mod points should go to the parent post.
        This is how I see (and experience) things as well. Social media connections have become increasingly shallow, to the point of being nothing more than junk gathered in a big drawer.
        Professionally peaking, LinkedIn became nothing. Years ago it still had some value because the amount of connections was relatively low and driven by meaningful interactions. Nowadays, almost no day passes without some recruiter from god knows which generic company requesting a con

    • by Destoo ( 530123 )

      "Demographically speaking I should be a heavy social media user, but that is not the case. I've never had a social media account."
      I think the author is more confused than we are.

    • by jbengt ( 874751 )

      Instead, it's an article saying that posting on social media won't magically lead to a career. I'm confused as to why the author would ever think that posting on social media could lead to anything in the first place.

      Well, my nephew's wife got a job that's mostly posting on social media. So there's that, anyway.

    • Headline writers are often not the same people as the article authors.

  • Not at all true (Score:5, Insightful)

    by SuperKendall ( 25149 ) on Monday November 21, 2016 @01:27PM (#53332613)

    Yes if you are just retweeting a bunch of stuff your Twitter feed will do nothing for you.

    But if you have a professional Twitter feed that you contribute valuable material to, that would be looked on pretty favorably by someone hiring at a company. It's not that much different than having a good record of contribution on GitHub, which I know some employers also look at.

    Basically just be aware that anything you do on social media these days will be accessible to companies you may want to work for, use that to your advantage - post responsibly my friends.

    • Quality over quantity.
    • Re:Not at all true (Score:4, Interesting)

      by MightyMartian ( 840721 ) on Monday November 21, 2016 @01:44PM (#53332751) Journal

      But folks around here absolutely insist that no company should ever make employment decisions based on your personally stated views. If you want to be a Neo-nazi in your off hours, why, the company should have no right to say "We don't want a Neo-Nazi working for us..." Or, if you're the prospective CEO of a company with a diverse workforce including LGBT individuals, the Board should have no right to disqualify you if you go around declaring "Gays are evil..."

      • Indeed! And those people often defens such things on the grounds of free speech.

        In my opinion, some of the worst enemies of free speech are it's strongest advocates. They argue that it shouldn't matter what people say because words have no consequences. I say, if it has no consequences, why is it imporant that speech be free? Nothing consequence free is important.

        I think free speech is so very important precisely because words can have enormous consequences and effect.

        • Re:Not at all true (Score:4, Interesting)

          by lgw ( 121541 ) on Monday November 21, 2016 @02:11PM (#53332981) Journal

          Are you old enough to remember when the religious right was the self-appointed gatekeepers of American morality, and had the power to restrict speech they disagreed with?

          Your words and attitude remind me strongly of them. Free speech is important, but Howard Stern needs to lose his job, that sort of degeneracy will destroy America, and then no one will have free speech.

          Oh, your catalog of sins is different, of course, as if that mattered. 30 years ago it was "too racy, too sexy". These days it's "too racist, too sexist". Censorious moral busybodies, the lot of you.
           

          • Are you old enough to remember when the religious right was the self-appointed gatekeepers of American morality, and had the power to restrict speech they disagreed with?

            Old enough? I'm not American.

            Your words and attitude remind me strongly of them.

            Then you don't understand my words.

            Free speech is important,

            That is precisely what I said.

            , but Howard Stern needs to lose his job, that sort of degeneracy will destroy America, and then no one will have free speech.

            You siad that, not I.

            Oh, your catalog of sins

      • Because when you end up on the news or other media outlet because of your personally stated views it can reflect badly on the employer. We constantly see this happening where somebody will say something racist/offensive, and the first thing the reporter will do is mention who they work for. Who they work for might have nothing to do with the story, but if it's a big enough company with a recognizable name, you can bet that the employer is going to be mentioned.

      • Except that a lot of people really really want to make this legal so that companies can discriminate all they want. Both on the left and the right. While I don't agree with Libertarians, I do like their concept of "none of my damned business".

    • by NotAPK ( 4529127 )

      "contribute valuable material to"

      Care to provide a single example of valuable material contributed to the world via Twitter?

  • by redmid17 ( 1217076 ) on Monday November 21, 2016 @01:28PM (#53332617)
    I highly highly doubt it's a career. Or you could just be really, really shitty at your job. I made it about 2 paragraphs but had to stop when he was talking about some guy who felt the need to update his blog every 30 minutes. That's just an abnormal amount of anxiety and narcissism, not to mention an insane outlook on social media and modern life.
    • by shaitand ( 626655 ) on Monday November 21, 2016 @01:50PM (#53332781) Journal
      No, there is some legitimacy here. Not the authors actual argument which seems to depend on the premise that we are all worker droids and the only in an activity is how it will impact your ability to indenture yourself into the service of others or at least financially. But there is a degree of truth to the headline. Employers all search social media (or have background investigation firms do so, often illegally since they always access even restricted and private profiles). Using social media in and of itself has no impact on your career except in instances where you do not and employers distrust you because they CAN'T snoop on you.

      Having said the wrong thing on social media can impact your ability to obtain employment or even cause you to lose your job, setting the privacy settings on a post incorrect can reveal to a jealous and two-faced co-worker that your sick day was a personal day or reveal the truth behind the double face we all wear privately vs the official workplace place we present. There is very little chance you will benefit financially or in your career from social media so using only increases the chance of it hurting you in those ways at some point.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 21, 2016 @01:28PM (#53332619)

    I, Anonymous Coward, will stop giving you all my great comments and ideas. My valuable work will go elsewhere.

  • Roller Coaster (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 21, 2016 @01:29PM (#53332631)

    People go to amusement parks which doesn't contribute anything to their careers either. Author clearly doesn't understand the text based amusement park we call social media.

    • People go to amusement parks which doesn't contribute anything to their careers either. Author clearly doesn't understand the text based amusement park we call social media.

      People don't earn six and seven-figure salaries riding roller coasters.

      The same can hardly be said for social media, which is probably where the confusion lies. You can literally make a career armed with nothing more than YouTube and a camera.

      Didn't say it makes sense. Just stating fact.

      • Re:Roller Coaster (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Gilgaron ( 575091 ) on Monday November 21, 2016 @02:16PM (#53333021)
        I'd say most of us are as likely to make six figures riding roller coasters as posting to social media...
      • I'm willing to bet there are a couple YouTubers who make a living riding roller coasters. I know for a fact there are a couple professional reviewers for coasters outside of YouTube. I doubt any of them are quite a 6-figures yet, but I hope they do alright for themselves.
      • by ghoul ( 157158 )

        How about a gopro camera and videos of riding rollercoasters uploaded to youtube?

  • by El Cubano ( 631386 ) on Monday November 21, 2016 @01:35PM (#53332683)

    The other argues that by spending time on social media and sharing our thoughts, we are demeaning the value of our work, our ideas. (Editor's note: the link could be paywalled; alternate source.)

    What a shocker. An organization that exists solely because people pay them for their ideas advocates against other people giving away ideas for free. Next, you'll tell me that oil and coal companies argue that renewable energy has more negative environmental impact than fossil fuels and that the gun control crowd says that the more law abiding citizens have guns the more crime we will have.

  • In my profession, the (US) military, actual work and accomplishments are ignored in favor of social behaviors. Party planners get much more attention than operators.
  • Aristotle had it right -- moderation is critical. Personally, I participate very little in social media, and I have strong concerns (as do many people here) about stuff like Facebook's policies and agendas. That said, if you're willing to put up with that stuff, I don't see a problem with someone maintaining a social media account just to, for example, keep up with the activities of old friends and acquaintances. I know some people who don't even seem to know how to use email anymore, so this is the real

  • by HBI ( 604924 ) on Monday November 21, 2016 @01:42PM (#53332735) Journal

    Imagine the writer gurgling as he runs short of energy to continue treading water. There, now you have the idea.

  • Social media has replaced email for instant simulation at work. No wonder my coworkers are always looking at their cellphones.
  • by number6x ( 626555 ) on Monday November 21, 2016 @01:55PM (#53332829)

    Facebook is the opiate of the masses.

    • Facebook is the opiate of the masses.

      More like Krokodil [huffingtonpost.com].

    • Facebook is the new Television - opiate of the masses. The article is right that unthinking usage of either is a sign of stupidity. However HR may be looking to hire idiots, they are at least easy to control.

  • by Kjella ( 173770 ) on Monday November 21, 2016 @01:56PM (#53332835) Homepage

    Interesting opportunities and useful connections are not as scarce as social media proponents claim. In my own professional life, for example, as I improved my standing as an academic and a writer

    Academics is all about getting works published. Writing is all about getting works published. In 95% of all careers, only your boss, coworkers and maybe a few direct recipients know what you've done. From him it's probably not wise to put out to much drivel on social media because he'll become another blogger with mouth diarrhea, if you read anything with his name on it should be a high quality work that leaves you impressed. For most everybody else though networking is their little way of telling the world here am I and these are my skills, recognition by other professionals is key to making a career. Not that I really have the patience or desire to engage in much of that outside working hours, but there's no denying that a lot of people who are good at it and spend a lot of time doing it get good opportunities.

    • For most everybody else though networking is their little way of telling the world here am I and these are my skills, recognition by other professionals is key to making a career.

      The question is whether social media is actually effective "networking" for most people, and whether its networking benefits outweigh its dangers.

      Social media kind of reminds me of what people used to do a couple decades ago in attending job fairs and some sort of "mixer" or party to "network" among peers and potential employers. (I assume some people still do that, too.)

      Anyhow, while it is possible to make contacts at such things, the REAL networking takes place in private conversations. People you h

  • In ages past, people advocated taking up things like Golf (or Tennis or simply going to the Gym) to help develop contacts to improve your career options.

    Some people took this to extremes and started to waste copious time playing Golf and weakly justifying the time spent to themselves (or their spouses) as somehow related advancing their careers even though it was probably holding them back because it became a distraction to their jobs.

    I don't see social media as any different than a modern form of "golf"...

    • The difference is that Golf generally had a better chance to put you in touch with the class of people who would likely improve your monetary standing, as they generally could afford hobbies like golf.

  • ...does Slashdot count as "social media". If so, title seems correct to me...
  • She said, she said
    'You don't know shit,
    Because you've never been there'
    She turned upon him,

    Took him by the hair
    Spun him round about,
    Laughing as he fell about,
    Sat down for a drink

    In her father's favourite chair
    Kill your Television [youtube.com]

  • I've never heard of him. he has no reputation.

  • I have a deadline coming up for this NYT article, and I haven't done anything but Facebook and Twitter all week so I don't even have an idea for a topic yet.....WAIT! I'VE GOT IT!
  • Ideas, kept locked in your brain and taken to your grave are worthless.

    Ideas that are shared with others go through a Darwinian evolution where others can scrutinize the idea before committing any resources to that idea.

    Simply put - sharing your idea with others could save you from trying to develop a bad one - and encourage the development of good ones.

    Maybe the NYT should run its opinions by a few people on social media before deciding to post really stupid ones like the article above.

  • The guy that wrong this from NYTimes obviously did drugs before writing it. The company that I work for, having over 400K employees, actually condones employees to take breaks and share opinions on social media.
    • It is a handy way of finding troublemakers, especially if you have 400k potential ones to look after - the ones that do not post are obviously a risk so keep on posting those cat videos

  • 'Quit Social Media.

    To paraphrase a certain highly-acclaimed movie, I Wish I Knew How to Quit You [youtube.com], Slashdot...

  • by Qbertino ( 265505 ) <moiraNO@SPAMmodparlor.com> on Monday November 21, 2016 @03:47PM (#53333833)

    As a computer expert I avoid social media for anything mission critical, as I suppose many here do.
    I also use fake names, just as in the days of old on IRC and Usenet.

    Personally, I see 3-4 big dangers in social media:

    1) The first is the obvious one: Total surveillance. Brave New World meets 1984 meets Neuromancer meets Snow Crash. And all in bad ways. Not for me. And I tell everyone I meet what FarceBook and WhatsCrap mean for their privacy.

    2) Social Media is very short lived and eats up time at the same time.

    3) The negative impact social media has on the human psyche is, in my opinion, quite significant. FOMO, self-esteem issues and F4ceb00k depression are real things and they exist with a measurable amount of people who live through mass social media. Social media emulates belonging to a community whilst at the same time causing us to drift further and further apart.

    A point in case: My fiancé is an online PR / SMM worker and loves her job although she's being paid pretty crappy.
    Just watching her being sucked up into some online thing going on that she has to attend to for private or work reasons at just about any possible occasion makes me look like a super-relaxed shepherd in comparsion. ... It's a bit scary to be honest. I don't want to know what people will be like 30 years from now.

    4) Addiction and behavioral imacpt: I see this issue with younger generations who live through social media and I think it's turning a large portion of those using social media into an ADHD-driven OCD candidates.

    • I don't want to know what people will be like 30 years from now.

      What this means is that in the future people will completely hand over control of everything to AI, because their attention span and critical thinking skills will be in the toilet.

  • Slashdot has been making me less productive since before Twitter and Facebook were a gleam in the eye of Jack Dorsey and Mark Zuckerberg's eyes. And I've been using "well, it's technical, so maybe I'll meet someone or learn something" as an excuse to read slashdot the whole time. Doh! I'm doing it again, right now, as I type. Screw this trash. I'm done with it. I hereby give up caffeine too, since its clearly just a tool the Illuminati use to control us all.

  • You're looking for a job. Meanwhile, you receive a Facebook friend request from an old acqaintance that you haven't seen for years. You accept, and continue your job search.

    A potential employer gets your resume, and has a contractor check your facebook account. They check everything they can, including your friend list. They discover that one of your Facebook friends is an ex-con, who just got out of prison after doing 3 years for drug possession. Let's just say that won't help your chances of getting hired

  • The New York Times ran a strong opinion piece that talks about one critical reason why everyone should quit social media: your career is dependent on it. The other argues that by spending time on social media and sharing our thoughts, we are demeaning the value of our work, our ideas.

    Translation: if people post news and commentary to social media for free, the NYT is out of business.

    Journalists, get used to it: you are as obsolete as buggy whip makers.

    • The New York Times ran a strong opinion piece that talks about one critical reason why everyone should quit social media: your career is dependent on it. The other argues that by spending time on social media and sharing our thoughts, we are demeaning the value of our work, our ideas.

      Translation: if people post news and commentary to social media for free, the NYT is out of business.

      Journalists, get used to it: you are as obsolete as buggy whip makers.

      There were no buggy whip makers in Idiocracy either, as far as I remember.

      • There were no buggy whip makers in Idiocracy either, as far as I remember.

        You're right: my analogy was not particularly good. Buggy whip makers may be obsolete, but when their product was in demand, they were actually skilled craftsmen that provided a useful product. Such skill wouldn't exist in the world of Idiocracy. Journalists, on the other hand, neither need a lot of craftsmanship or skill, and they probably played a large role in the downfall of society in Idiocracy. And while 99.999% of all professio

  • My second objection concerns the idea that social media is harmless. Consider that the ability to concentrate without distraction on hard tasks is becoming increasingly valuable in an increasingly complicated economy. Social media weakens this skill because it’s engineered to be addictive. The more you use social media in the way it’s designed to be used — persistently throughout your waking hours — the more your brain learns to crave a quick hit of stimulus at the slightest hint of boredom. Once this Pavlovian connection is solidified, it becomes hard to give difficult tasks the unbroken concentration they require, and your brain simply won’t tolerate such a long period without a fix. Indeed, part of my own rejection of social media comes from this fear that these services will diminish my ability to concentrate — the skill on which I make my living.

    This is spot on.

    I see this behavior from almost all of my co-workers(millenials...) who are looking at their phones every free second they have. It is disturbing behavior to say the least. FB, Twitter, Snapchat, etc; People have a hard enough time staying focused on daily tasks, whether at home or at work, without the constant firehose of social media "focus" being placed front and center into everyones attention.

    All Social Media - All The Time

  • ...let's go through this article, point by point and weigh up the validity, reliability, and relevance of each one... ...ooh! Is that a photo of a squirrel doing cute human-like things with its tiny paws?!!

  • I have a sysadmin job by day for my main income. But I am also a craftsman and artist in my free time. I occupy a niche within a niche and I am pretty successful and recognized as a skilled person who makes nice things.

    None of that would be possible without social media to share pictures of my work, or having customers contact me. More than half my orders come from people contacting me via my fb page. The rest via a forum on which I am very active, and a handful through my website. So I'd say 90% at least v

    • Using facebook to help your business sell more stuff isn't really what people mean by"social media" it's just using a free alternative to e-Bay or an online store.
  • I don't use social media like FB, Twitter, Instagram, snapchat and so on as I get the feeling that I don't get anything done. When my friends ask me why, I tell them that I use computers all the time and prefer not to use them in my down time, then joke that I'd get sucked in and find myself reading about someone's cats at 2:30am. I laugh however it's only half a joke.

    Back in the day rec.humor.funny was my favorite but I found that "the net" could really suck you in. Back then I was lucky enough to recogn

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