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Windows Bug Microsoft Networking

New Bug In Windows 10 Anniversary Update Brings Wi-Fi Disconnects (infoworld.com) 191

Some Windows 10 PCs are now experiencing sudden drops in their Wi-Fi connections, with the Network Diagnostics tool reporting "Wi-Fi doesn't have a valid IP configuration." An anonymous reader quotes InfoWorld's Woody Leonhard: I've heard from many people who blame the Wi-Fi disconnect on Friday's KB 3201845, the patch (which still isn't documented on the Win10 update history site) that brings version 1607 up to build 14393.479. It's unlikely that the new patch brought on the bug because the large influx of complaints started on December 7 -- two days before the patch...

Speculation at this point says the disconnect results when a machine performs a fast startup, setting the machine's IP address to 169.x.x.x. It's an old problem, but somehow it's come back in spades in the past two days. I have no idea what triggered the sudden outbreak, as there were no Win10 1607 patches issued on December 6, 7 or 8.

Microsoft acknowledged the problem Thursday, recommending customers try restarting their PCs (or performing a clean start). Woody writes that it looks like Microsoft's latest Windows 10 patch "didn't cause the bug. But the patch didn't fix it, either."
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New Bug In Windows 10 Anniversary Update Brings Wi-Fi Disconnects

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  • Deja Vu? (Score:4, Funny)

    by Carewolf ( 581105 ) on Saturday December 10, 2016 @11:38AM (#53459061) Homepage

    Wifi disconnects after OS updates. My god, they really are copying macOS updates, right down to WiFI bugs.

  • Fix Action (Score:4, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 10, 2016 @11:39AM (#53459063)

    I have this problem as well. Running DHCP on the router I use. When I do an IP config I see a MS assigned address. Doing an IPCONFIG /RENEW gets a new IP address without the reboot.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      I was gonna say. I have a Command Prompt window open that I've been doing "ipconfig /release" and then "ipconfig /renew" in. (Is the /release unnecessary? I recall trying just the /renew and it didn't work.)

      Didn't consider that it was a recent Windows update that broke it, I figured I borked something in my DHCP configuration, but it's nice to know that I'm not insane and it's a Windows issue. Very annoying.

      • I did the ipconfig/release .... stuff and it didn't work.
        Then logged into the router and turned off encryption (based on microsoft help page) and that _appeared_ to work
        Didn't actually work. After a reboot, still couldn't connect.

        Then it happened to my wife's PC but did not happen to my work one (windows 7) so, more searching.
        Turned off Windows Defender and it was able to get the new ip
        Windows Defender wanted itself turned on again so I did and now everything appears to be working.

        Looks like Windows
  • by Anonymous Coward

    Forced Windows updates must bring constant excitement to business people at travel. You never know, if the machine works after connecting it to network. And nobody in IT is there to help them.

    • by ledow ( 319597 )

      Why would a business person not be subject to domain control and WSUS even on a mobile PC?

    • They're just trying to keep up with Google. More than once, I've given a sales person a locally installed demonstrator for some web app that was working when they left the office, and then the demo was undermined when they connected their laptop to the Internet while out of the office and Chrome self-updated and broke something.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    setting the machine's IP address to 169.x.x.x

    No no and more no, don't ever do that!

    The local link IP range is 169.254.0.0/16, aka 169.254.x.x

    If anyone is using IPs outside of 169.254.0.0/16 but within 169.0.0.0/8 like is stated, you are trampling on other peoples IP addresses!
    You don't want to be Linksys do you? No, no one wants to be Linksys, so stop that.

    • Migrate to IPv6 already, instead of monkeying around w/ IPv4 addresses that may or may not be in a private range.
      • My ISP doesn't offer IPv6. If I use a tunnel brokering service like hurricane electric, google keeps asking me for a capatcha.

      • The issue is not ipv4. It's the corrupted windsock catalog. Ipv6 is impacted as well. The solution is to reset it with nutshell from an elevated command prompt or PowerShell:

        netsh winsock reset catalog
        netsh int ipv4 reset reset.log

        Or use an older more reliable OS until MS hires a QA team again and stop relying on Joe Six packs as their QA team

  • by Maddog Batty ( 112434 ) on Saturday December 10, 2016 @11:50AM (#53459107) Homepage

    I had the same problem on Wednesday with a wired connection. A reboot fixed it (after a lot of head scratching).

    • I had the same problem on Wednesday with a weird connection. A reboot fixed it (after a lot of head scratching).

      ftfy

    • I had the same problem on Wednesday with a wired connection. A reboot fixed it (after a lot of head scratching).

      I also had the same problem on Wednesday, the last time I used Windows. But it was in 1998.

  • by Shaman ( 1148 ) <`ten.sok' `ta' `namahs'> on Saturday December 10, 2016 @11:50AM (#53459109) Homepage

    Hold the shift key down when you reboot, and keep it down until the login screen.

    Source: I own an ISP.

  • by Aryeh Goretsky ( 129230 ) on Saturday December 10, 2016 @11:56AM (#53459127) Homepage

    Hello,

    This issue has been going on for more than two days. Reports of it date almost a month:

    https://www.reddit.com/r/sysad... [reddit.com]

    https://community.spiceworks.c... [spiceworks.com]

    Although reports of it in Microsoft's support forum are more recent:

    https://answers.microsoft.com/... [microsoft.com]

    https://answers.microsoft.com/... [microsoft.com]

    https://answers.microsoft.com/... [microsoft.com]

    The December 9th patch - https://support.microsoft.com/... [microsoft.com] - might contain some kind of fix or workaround, although I don't see anything mentioned on the page which maps to the issue.

    Microsoft is keeping customers up to date with a page on its support forum. Here's Microsoft's short link to the page: https://aka.ms/netcom [aka.ms]

    Regards,

    Aryeh Goretsky

  • by BenJeremy ( 181303 ) on Saturday December 10, 2016 @12:01PM (#53459143)

    ...my keyboard wasn't working. I had to unplug it and re-plug it back in. Annoying. I haven't tried out the WiFi issue yet, because I wire my network connections everywhere possible.

    The keyboard not working is a strange issue, though. I don't need a "fast reboot" option - with my system drive speed, I boot in 6 seconds from power button on to desktop on a cold boot. I don't need sleep mode, hibernation... I just need proper memory management for longer up times.

  • by ErichTheRed ( 39327 ) on Saturday December 10, 2016 @12:08PM (#53459165)

    I've been on the Windows 10 Insider program for quite a while, and keep one work machine on a stable build and the other in the Fast ring. For a lot of our production machines, we're going to go with the next spin of Long Term Servicing Branch for just this reason. I'm not happy that you have to give up all feature updates for years in order to get an OS they're not going to be changing behavior on every month.

    Having seen both the stable and super-new builds running similar application loads, it's obvious that Microsoft is skimping on code quality in both, sacrificing it for fast feature releases. However, very few "breaking" bugs make it into their stable (CBB) builds. I'm not happy that the home consumers have to deal with these though...they have no choice. And when it's something like breaking wireless, that's a big deal -- most users are at least on laptops now if not tablets.

    On balance I think they made the right decision for the overall market on patching. Unpatched Windows home machines are just asking for ransomware or a botnet takeover, and consumers have no clue how to manage their machines. For business, I think they made an OK compromise, but wish they would make the updates not be all-or-nothing. The user population I support runs hundreds of applications from sources we don't control, and right now on Windows 7 we get a few security updates a year that break them, some in ways we can't fix without getting the vendor to make a change. In the old pick-and-choose model, we would figure out which monthly updates didn't break the application set and apply them, then wait for a time we could apply the "bad" ones when an application drops off the radar or gets fixed.

    • I hate to tell you this but build 1607 anniversary update is already CBB grade with enterprises running it as you read this .... Complete with their IT techs getting calls this weekend on why the director's laptop stopped working after an update.

      I have a fresh rebuild right now in my living room. I am seriously contemplating not going thru on Windows 10 and using an older saved acronis 8.1 image for the same cpu/ motherboard? I cannot guarantee it will just work until redstone2 comes out next April when 160

    • I'm not happy that you have to give up all feature updates for years in order to get an OS they're not going to be changing behavior on every month.

      The good news is that I can fix your problem. The bad news is you won't be reveling as part of "The Glorious PC Gaming Master Race" with the latest titles anymore.

  • by Chas ( 5144 ) on Saturday December 10, 2016 @12:09PM (#53459169) Homepage Journal

    When your OS vendor tosses their Q&A and basically uses their user base for testing out their shitty product.

    Still very happy with Win7, and there's ZERO need to upgrade at this point.

    • This.

      I'm a retired IT guy, and at 71 years old, I started my geek career 52 years ago in this man's Navy repairing avionics.

      I have lived every stinking second of Microsoft starting with DOS back in 1978, Windows 1.0, Office products, and servers.

      I've associated with some piss-poor systems people before who would make a change, step out the door of the computer room, and if they heard a chorus of, "God Damn!!!!!" would revert and undo.

      That's my experience with Microsoft.

      They release prematurely and crowd-sou

    • by antdude ( 79039 )

      Yes, operating system vendors have too many question and answers!

  • I really feel for their users..... really I do. Poor poor them. *Continues using apt-apt update*
  • by Billly Gates ( 198444 ) on Saturday December 10, 2016 @12:36PM (#53459247) Journal

    The Register has the scoop on it [theregister.co.uk].

    Some users report typing:
    netsh winsock reset catalog
    netsh int ipv4 reset reset.log

    Has repaired their TCP/IP stack.

    Unrelated, I just woke up after I rebuilt a computer last night. I am greeted with a Windows 10 setup screen. I also have an older saved Windows 8.1 acronis image for same cpu and motherboard. I was just wondering if I should bite the bullet and go Windows 10 as I work in IT and need to know it ...

    However this story scared me and got me wondering if that is really a good idea? What do you all think? Hmm

    • by wjcofkc ( 964165 )
      It if you work in IT WIndows 10 is great as you get all things Windows as well as Bash on Windows. This is a Microsoft\Ubuntu collaboration that is merging Linux and Windows and it is proving to be very effective. This is not a VM or some compatibility layer, this is total Bash on Windows with all the *nix utilities you would expect. You can even interact, configure, and otherwise modify the Win 10 OS from a bash shell. As it is Ubuntu, you also have apt-get and can install pretty close to any Linux softwar
      • Translation: I'm an MS shill

      • No offense but you don't work in IT unless you're a developer. If you are then I forgive you.

        If you're an admin or end user support then 10 is a nightmare! Having something as fundamental as DHCP not working will wreak havoc in the office ... And your career if problems keep hitting every few months. They will blame YOU not 10 after 3 or 4 outages.

        Then you're fired or denied a promotion etc. We tend to hate change like Vista and 8 and now 10 as compliants are brought up each performance review

      • by dbIII ( 701233 )

        this is total Bash on Windows with all the *nix utilities you would expect.

        Cygwin has had more of them on MS Windows since Win2k was new.

      • by gtall ( 79522 )

        Shut up, Satya.

  • 20 years (Score:4, Insightful)

    by JustAnotherOldGuy ( 4145623 ) on Saturday December 10, 2016 @12:41PM (#53459265)

    "Microsoft acknowledged the problem Thursday, recommending customers try restarting their PCs"

    Almost 25 fuckin' years after releasing Win 3.1, and their trouble shooting advice is still "have you tried restarting it?"

    On the other hand, I have a Linux server that just passed 1015 days uptime with no restarts or reboots. It hosts about 50 websites and runs 24/7 with constant activity. Windows couldn't even dream of that kind of service.

    • Not to sound like an ass but I will quote/paraphrase something I read on similar topic on theregister.co.uk this morning.

      He said um what do you guys do all day on your computers that run Linux? Do you all just browse the web and do nothing else but pretend to be important with no other apps?

      Do you all run 90% of your work in virtual machines where you run Windows anyway?

      He went on saying he uses music production software and hardware and something called DAW. The free software is horrible and is no

      • He said um what do you guys do all day on your computers that run Linux?

        Like I said, I have a Linux server (3 actually) that host websites. Between the 3 of them they host about 150 sites, and they make money for me as well as providing various other services, some which I give away at no cost. So that's what I do with Linux.

        I also have Linux Mint on my laptop and for basic day-to-day stuff it does everything I need (email, browsing, video, audio, etc).

        I'll be the first to say that there's really no good equivalent for some applications like Photoshop, Illustrator, etc. For th

        • Again running servers does not count. THat is even more niche than uses with photoshop and illustrator as some people do photography as a hobby and any marketing department uses these tools for sales, commercials, promotional material creation, etc. However, if you hate Windows there is always the Mac for these users. I would argue MacOSX is superior to these folks due to things like color calibration and fonts, but Windows 7 and 10 have finally caught up to Mac of 1998 :-)

          So before blaming the user why sho

      • by dbIII ( 701233 )

        He said um what do you guys do all day on your computers that run Linux

        Typically when linux is used in an office it is to run scientific, engineering or other workstation software so they just sneer right back at you and your one page spreadsheets.

    • Also I will add Windows can serve 50 websites just fine with high uptime if you are a competent system administrator who knows PowerShell direct, dsc, IIS, and good Windows Server administration skills. Azure is a good example.

      Updates break Linux as well if not more because it lacks a stable ABI due to theological reasons of RMS like any other os. Xorg and video drivers are classic examples.

      • Also I will add Windows can serve 50 websites just fine with high uptime

        That's nice. I hope you enjoy paying for it year after year. :)

        As I mentioned in another post, I have 3 servers. One has about 50 sites, one has about 100 sites, and the newest one has only had about a dozen sites put on it so far. Quite a few of them are high traffic, probably more than a Windows box could sustain. And these servers are basic, medium grade units, nothing heavy duty...and yet they seem to do just fine. Millions of hits a day, day after day, week after week.

        Uptime? I have 1000+ days on one s

    • Almost 25 fuckin' years after releasing Win 3.1, and their trouble shooting advice is still "have you tried restarting it?"

      Their? Everyone's advise is that. It puts a device back to a somewhat known state. There are plenty of cases where Linux machines have been suggested to do the same. I've done it with Unix machines to fix faults to which we had limited insight. Vendors will ship devices with embedded controllers that have dedicated reset switches on them and when they don't they'll advise simply turning it off and on again.

      And on one of our $100,000 Nuclear E1 certified safety systems, when a discrepancy is noticed between

      • Re:20 years (Score:4, Funny)

        by JustAnotherOldGuy ( 4145623 ) on Saturday December 10, 2016 @05:45PM (#53460515)

        All of our Windows machines at my last work place had over 5 years on them

        Lol, sure they did. And I was a door gunner on the Space Shuttle.

        • Windows doesn't randomly crash, and hasn't had a specific periodic crash frequency since Windows 95. On boxes like servers specifically which spend a lot of time doing very repetitive and continuous tasks such as firing up a thread to serve a web page and killing it again, if it works the first time it's likely to keep working baring some programming error such as a memory leak or a hardware fault.

          If you can't keep such a machine up, you shouldn't be a system administrator.

          Actually I'd challenge the opposi

          • If you can't keep such a machine up, you shouldn't be a system administrator.

            I don't really need to be a system administrator; my servers all just run and run without having to dick around with them.

            On the rare occasion I install something or make a change, I don't even have to reboot them, unlike a Windows machine. On Windows, just updating your mouse driver requires a restart, lol.

            -

            These machines are more likely to stay up when they are completely untouched

            Ahhh, so a Windows box will run forever as long as it's not actually used for anything. Wonderful.

            • I don't really need to be a system administrator; my servers all just run and run without having to dick around with them.

              So what you're saying is you're just a janitor and someone else gave you a computer to sit next to and dust off every so often. Or do you think computers magic themselves into existence, or do you not understand the job description?

              On the rare occasion I install something or make a change, I don't even have to reboot them, unlike a Windows machine.

              If you're rebooting your windows machine for anything other than OS updates you're doing it wrong. If a reboot is a problem for you, you're doing it VERY wrong.

              Ahhh, so a Windows box will run forever as long as it's not actually used for anything. Wonderful.

              You said it yourself, dick around. Not touching a machine and it not doing anything useful are two different things. If

              • Or do you think computers magic themselves into existence

                Lol, yes, thegarbz, that is exactly what I think. I hope you don't claim some different reason for them appearing right in the exact rack where I need them to be.

          • Windows doesn't randomly crash,

            Sure about that? That's not my experience.

            • Yes. Since the days of Windows XP and later every crash can be traced back to an improper driver handling, a hardware failure or my personal favorite: software doing shit it was never supposed to (I'm looking at you specifically anti-virus software).

              • So you're saying that Windows is insufficiently robust? Hardware failures that can't be recovered from are pretty darn rare. We're talking CPU, memory, and mass storage devices. Crashes from anything less vital to the OS are Windows' fault. Application programs should never cause the OS to crash.

                • So you're saying that Windows is insufficiently robust?

                  No I'm saying that it is flying under the radar of obscurity. I'm sure HP programmers can bring down the Linux kernel with a driver 4x larger than the kernel itself just as easily as windows.

                  Speaking of, last time I had a problem with my RAID controller on my Linux server do you know how I found out? "Oops" Followed by gibberish.

                  Hardware failures that can't be recovered from are pretty darn rare

                  Which is why Windows has no problem with uptime on enterprise grade hardware. In the mean time I can crash both my Windows machine and my Linux machine right now by unplugging a fan

                  • I said I get random Windows crashes on a computer that's not low-end. The original claim was that that didn't happen.

              • Yes. Since the days of Windows XP and later every crash can be traced back to an improper driver handling, a hardware failure or my personal favorite: software doing shit it was never supposed to (I'm looking at you specifically anti-virus software).

                Ahhh, the "No True Scotsman" fallacy, or in this case, the "No True Windows Bug" fallacy.

                Glorious. It's always something else's fault, it couldn't POSSIBLY be a fault in Windows. lol

      • >that just passed 1015 days uptime with no restarts or reboots

        If that's really true, then you haven't been patching. I would not be bragging about a system that poorly managed and vulnerable.

        • I would not be bragging about a system that poorly managed and vulnerable.

          Are you replying to me or the parent? The parent's example is quite scary as it hosts a wide variety of customers and clearly has outside access.

          The even longer uptimes we have, you're 100% right. We haven't been patching. We didn't patch in the previous outage, we weren't planning a patch in a subsequent one, and we don't run virus protection or firewalls on the system either.

          Mind you it's a closed network inside a room with access control and restricted to only 5 people each of whom have a lot to lose whe

  • by Anonymous Coward

    My computer is used for retail. The last time there was an updat it too about 4 hours to get my system back. I've shut down and turned back on and nothing. I can't believe this is happening on a Saturday in December.

    • by ledow ( 319597 )

      Keep a spare computer, if it's that important.

      • Or just don't run Windows 10.

        Thankfully I have a copy of acronis with an older 8.1image with updates disabled to just download. I install them manually a month or so later.

        I really did want to keep 10 and if works fine for a few weeks and I always run into a problem every other month or so. So damn frustrating. I NEED to learn 10 for work as we will migrate soon but shit too many problems??

        • by ledow ( 319597 )

          To be honest, the price of a copy of VMWare Workstation or similar is well worth it.

          Run business stuff in a VM, then any computer you can put that VM onto and carry on. Meanwhile your choice of hypervisor OS (Linux or Windows), and your choice of personal platform (e.g. Windows for gaming) doesn't make any difference.

          Hell, Pro versions of Windows all come ready with the software to create and run HyperV images of Windows and Linux, even the client versions.

          If your business depends on it and you can't run t

          • I use both.

            Problem is I do EUS end user support as well. That means if I work into an executive conference room and some VP or VIP client has a MS Surface with 10 I need to have the mouse clicks and screen memorized. Everything from logging out to changing TCP/IP settings are obscured or changed.

            Worse if I want to work with a MS gold partner I need my MCSE Mouse Click System Engineer cert updated. HUGE mouse click and option memorization to pass these tests. Though I do give credit MS has made the tests ver

        • by rew ( 6140 )

          > but shit too many problems??

          You should see a doctor about that.

      • This.

        If one computer aggravates, scoot your chair over to the other one.

  • by JoeyRox ( 2711699 ) on Saturday December 10, 2016 @12:50PM (#53459299)
    You loved last year's gift of privacy invasion so much I didn't know how to top that. Then I thought of disconnecting your WiFi so you would lose access to the single most essential activity on your computer. I hope you enjoy it!
    • by SeaFox ( 739806 )

      You loved last year's gift of privacy invasion so much I didn't know how to top that.

      Well, people said they wanted their computers to stop communicating with Microsoft's servers...

    • I would laugh at Microsoft's incompetence but I'm too busy trying to get my Debian system to boot after its last update.

      • I would laugh at Microsoft's incompetence but I'm too busy trying to get my Debian system to boot after its last update.

        Isn't SystemD great?

  • I have experienced Wi-Fi connection drops as well using Windows 10 and was thinking that something wrong with the router but I guess it may not be the issue.
  • It has dropped WiFi since Windows 8
    • Discrimination in private business on any grounds should be as legal as it is in sex and friendship.

      As long as the sex and friendship are bought.

      • by temcat ( 873475 )

        There is no reason for this distinction. Selling and buying is just one possible type of exchange which is the general basis of human action.

        • Discrimination in private business ...

          Logic requires equivalence.

          • by temcat ( 873475 )

            Yep. There's nothing illogical. Private business, friendship, and sex are all types of voluntary exchange between humans (the voluntary part was something that I missed in the last comment). They should have an equal legal status, whatever that status may be.

  • by sciengin ( 4278027 ) on Saturday December 10, 2016 @03:13PM (#53460001)

    As a long time Linux user I am glad that the Windows peasants are finally getting this feature that we have been enjoying for years.

    (yeah I know, its the fault of the device manufacturers)

  • You know I can see the reasoning by hind Window's current choice to take the users control away in terms of updates and why the want to force you to do so... but I'm sorry, how many critical bugs like this must we suffer until we can have our control back? How many times are we going to suffer the corporate whims of the Microsoft corporation before enough is enough?
  • I noticed just recently that my Windows 10 machine wasn't connecting to either the wired or wireless networks when I moved between home and office. IP addresses were defaulting to Microsoft's 169.254.0.0/16 range, as happens on Windows when DHCP attempt fails. Doing ipconfig /release and then ipconfig /renew would restore operation.

    The problem seems to stem from "fast startup" being enabled under Control Panel -> Power Options -> Choose what the power buttons do. With this feature enabled, performing

  • This happened to me twice this week. I had to do a battery pull from my laptop to get it to work right. A shutdown still did a fast boot so it didn't work Also an electrical contractor on a job site came in earlier this week to say his wifi didn't work. I had to do a battery pull for him too after wasting 20 minutes resetting the wifi, etc.
  • ... vulnerabilities have been found during this period. Have fun! Of course it might be theoretically possible that none of the websites that you host allow any form of code execution and your entire user space is up to date but that's just crazy - boasting about your uptime while keeping your kernel unsecured.
  • I probably ran into this at a client site on Friday, but I blamed it on the ancient WiFi router that they'd reconfigured to use as a switch. Ancient as in "hardware predates WPA2 and the plastic has faded to grey," wasn't handing out DHCP, and had nothing connected on the WAN side.

    One cheap 5-port switch and a reboot after removing a couple of unrelated pieces of junkware that I noticed and the PC and printer were back up.
  • The update left my wife's laptop with limited netwrok access: she was connected to the network, but had no internet connectivity. The following lines, typed in an admin prompt, fixed it:

    netsh int tcp set heuristics disabled
    netsh int tcp set global autotuninglevel=disabled
    netsh int tcp set global rss=enabled

Real Users are afraid they'll break the machine -- but they're never afraid to break your face.

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