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Android O Is Officially Launching August 21 (techcrunch.com) 86

Android O is set to arrive on August 21, with a livestreamed unveiling event timed for 2:40 PM ET in NYC -- which is roughly when the maximum solar eclipse is set to occur for New York. TechCrunch reports: Android O will get a full reveal at that time, which seems like kind of a weird time to do it since a lot of people will be watching the NASA eclipse livestream that Google is also promoting, or staring at the sky (with the caveat, hopefully, that they have procured proper glasses for safe viewing). Google says that Android O will have some "super (sweet) new powers," most of which we know all about thanks to pre-release builds and the Android O teaser Google provided at its annual I/O developer event this past May. WE know, for instance, that the notification panel has been changed significantly, and there's new optimization software to improve battery life on all devices. While Android O's name has yet to be confirmed, the official consumer name is speculated to be "Oreo." Prolific leaker Evan Blass posted a picture of an Oreo to Twitter on Friday following the announcement of the reveal date and event.
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Android O Is Officially Launching August 21

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  • New Android (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday August 18, 2017 @08:52PM (#55045523)

    Officially launching on less than 1% of all handsets.

    Nougat 7.0 is on less than 7% currently.

    Google still can't figure out how to make this work right after nearly a decade. Fully 93% of handsets aren't running the latest secure version and I don't see this changing with the next upcoming release.

    • by Mandrel ( 765308 )
      Even Samsung doesn't provide updates. Since I bought it in October last year, my A9 hasn't received any updates from Marshmallow 6.0.1. I'm not hopeful of any.
    • Lookup project Treble, it is about adding an abstraction layer so the is can be upgraded without requiring the drivers to also be updated by the vendor.

      • by Luthair ( 847766 )
        Which is a step in the right direction, unfortunately it doesn't help when the vulnerability is in the driver :)
    • Re:New Android (Score:5, Informative)

      by Lussarn ( 105276 ) on Saturday August 19, 2017 @04:55AM (#55046923)

      Fully 93% of handsets aren't running the latest secure version and I don't see this changing with the next upcoming release.

      Having the latest OS is not a requirement for having a secure OS. Several older OSes including Android releases are still receiving updates.

    • Actually, you can't figure out how all this works. Saying what you said is equivalent to saying everyone running Windows 7 and 8 are running the insecure versions of Windows, and all those running 10 are running "the secure version."
    • Maybe because the vast majority are low end android phones found in India, Africa, etc?
    • by Luthair ( 847766 )
      Google has figured it out fine, their devices are mostly upgraded. Unfortunately OEMs and carriers refuse to bother.
    • The fragmentation issue has been dead now for several years if that's what you're complaining about. Yes, few phones have the latest version, but:

      - Google has ensured all 4.x+ versions of Android have a common, full, API all programmers can code for.
      - Google pushes out security updates at every level for them.

      What are you missing by not having O on your cheap 2+ year old phone? The new features and UI of O, and nothing else. You still end up with the same apps, and the same level of security.

      • What are you missing by not having O on your cheap 2+ year old phone? The new features and UI of O, and nothing else. You still end up with the same apps, and the same level of security.

        No, that's really not true. It rapidly becomes practically impossible to get OS updates for many handsets, and those updates include security improvements. If you're lucky enough to have a device supported by Lineage OS then you have a reasonable alternative to carrier- or manufacturer-provided updates, but many people haven't got one of those.

      • I agree sortof, but the security issue is a real problem. Security fixes are almost never backported to old versions. I'm fairly fine with saying "you bought your phone with this featureset, that's all you get", and given that major OS updates often slow the device down in some cases I'd prefer that, but when a security problem arises then that needs to be patched and there's no way of doing that without the latest newest OS release. Same problem with iOS really, if you have an old device you have to upgrad

    • Fully 93% of handsets aren't running the latest secure version

      Actually you'll find most handsets are running the "latest secure version". Security fixes are backported and rolled out via OTA to many handsets that don't qualify for updates. Just because I have nothing like Android 7.0 doesn't mean I didn't get a security update rolled out OTA last week. Also many of the security problems in Android are patched through the Play Store as system components have become more and more separated from the core OS.

      I don't have access to 7.x but then I also don't run the latest

  • I have had enough of system partition Bloatware. There better be a Linux Kernel under this OS. Its bad enough there is increasing resistence to rooting devices. I don't mind if NetFlix won't run on my Phone because I have root, or because I have LineageOS. If I can't root it, I don't want it.

  • It sounds like there is a story to be told here. Could someone tell us the story of O?

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